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okanagan lake directory, waterfront vacation rentals, local businesses, shopping, vernon, kelowna, westbank, westside, winfield, kaleden, oyama, peachland, penticton, summerland, naramata

COMMUNITY WATER SYSTEM FOR MUIR SUBDIVISION, SHALAL ROAD, AND VALLEY OF THE SUN SUBDIVISIONS

Click refresh to be sure you see updates.

LAST UPDATE January 25, 2015

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These improvements are for the new IHA standards and will probably not be calculated into the original quote for the cost to build the Upper Fintry/Valley of the Sun/ Shalal Road water system.

North Westside receives funding
By Staff Writer - Vernon Morning Star - February 01, 2012

Funding is going towards water improvement projects in the North Westside Road area.

The Regional District of Central Okanagan board has approved the use of Community Works Fund gas tax revenue for upgrades to the Killiney, Westshore, Upper Fintry, Shalal Road and Valley of the Sun water systems

The amount of money that will be spent is $439,000.

The goal of the projects is to improve water quality, system operations and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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Effect of aging water mains on water quality in distribution systems - Projects - NRC-CNRC

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Need Site to process gravels for the new watermains going in at Fintry


click for larger copy

 

BC Underground - Pat Adkin - Project Manager - Kelowna BC
click for larger business card

posted on the bulletin board April 26, 2011

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Water quality study targets creek
Vernon Morning Star - By Jennifer Smith - October 23, 2010

The water quality of Kalamalka Lake is the topic of a recent report, which reveals that the main pollutants come from Coldstream Creek.

Despite some accusations that boaters are to blame for deteriorating water quality in Kalamalka Lake, reports show boaters are not the main culprit.

“Do the boats have an impact on the lake? I think some. Are they the biggest impact? Probably not,” said Michael Stamhuis, Coldstream’s chief administrative officer.

In fact the biggest impact on the lake’s water quality comes upstream, from Coldstream Creek, according to a recent report by Larratt Aquatic Consulting titled Source Assessment of the Regional District of North Okanagan – Greater Vernon Water North Kalamalka Lake Intake.

But that’s not to say boats don’t impact the water quality.

Each summer the estimated 3,500 boats launched at Kalavista boat launch alone contribute to pollution with motor oil, gasoline and lubricants via exhaust emissions. And the boat traffic near the lake’s drinking water intake can be intense during July and August. There are also serious issues caused by irresponsible power boating.

According to Environment Canada, one litre of gasoline can contaminate up to one million litres of water. As careful as boaters are, accidental spills during refueling do occur.

But the report states: “Because Kalamalka Lake has no large marinas, the risk presented by PAHs (hydrocarbon compounds typically from boats) to the (north Kal) intake is currently minimal.”

Rather, the creek is a bigger culprit. The creek carries 80 per cent of Kalamalka’s Lake annual inflow, therefore the report recommends that considerable work needs to be done to improve the creek, in order to improve the lake water quality.

“We are gradually looking at improvements one step at a time,” said Stamhuis. “But it will take a thousand steps to fully restore the creek.”

There are a number of factors along the creek that flow downstream to affect water quality in the lake.

“The creek is being hit with a thousand different impacts,” said Stamhuis.

Feces from birds and cattle are major contributors, but even potentially more so are those who live along the creek and the lake.

“Shoreline properties have the highest potential to impact the lake,” states the report, authored by Heather Larratt.

Lakebed substrate modification, riparian vegetation removal, construction of retaining walls, docks and other man-made features all impact the lake.

Coldstream is currently working on a bylaw to establish no-build/no-disturb setbacks from the high water mark. Although there is already similar provincial legislation, many waterfront owners don’t realize that from the high water mark to the water is Crown land, not theirs.

There is also a recommendation to create a protection zone on the north end of Kalamalka Lake, which would, for example, restrict marinas and development.

Septic systems are also a big factor. Although septic fields have been eliminated on lakefront properties, there are still a number of fields on properties bordering the creek.

The District of Coldstream has continually struggled to get more homeowners hooked onto the sewer systems, but many are reluctant, particularly if their septic fields are in good working order.

“They’re not going to be excited about shelling out large dollars to hook up,” said Stamhuis.

Properties bordering the creek and lake also leach fertilizers and other chemicals and substances into the water.

“It’s where the lawn goes right to the edge of the water is usually where there’s a pretty big impact,” said Stamhuis, encouraging property owners not to use fertilizers and to plant buffers such as trees and shrubs to protect the water.

The report also recommends extending the existing drinking water intake at the north arm of Kalamalka Lake

While Coldstream is gradually working to improve water quality via the creek and lake, the district cannot control everything.

Coldstream would like to work with Greater Vernon Water towards improvements, and also needs the assistance of others.

For example, when it comes to cattle impacts on the creek and manure, many farmers are working to minimize impacts on the creek, but Coldstream has no authority to control those who aren’t.

“We can’t legislate what comes off the farm properties, but we may be able to convince the province to implement enforcement of best practices.”

Since most of the watershed lies outside of Coldstream and NORD’s jurisdiction, they are also restricted in their ability to protect their water source.

Therefore they require the co-operation of all residents, recreation enthusiasts and developers.

As the report states: “Water quality relies on every resident and user of the resource.”

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Water quality audit begins in Oyama
Vernon Morning Star - October 14, 2010

The Forest Practices Board will audit how well forest and range practices in the Vernon Creek and Oyama Creek community watersheds are protecting water quality, beginning Monday.

The forest practices of Tolko Industries, B.C. Timber Sales and the Ministry of Forests’ small scale salvage program, as well as range practices of three range tenure holders, will be examined.

The watersheds are located next to each other on the east side of Okanagan Lake, south of Vernon, and supply drinking water to the communities of Oyama and Winfield.

The two main objectives of this audit are to assess the compliance of forest and range practices with FRPA’s practice requirements for water, and to assess how well practices are achieving government’s objectives for protecting drinking water.

Once the audit work is completed, a report will be prepared, and any party that may be adversely affected by the audit findings will have a chance to respond.

The board’s final report and recommendations will then be released to the public and government.

The Forest Practices Board is B.C.’s independent watchdog for forest and range practices, reporting its findings and recommendations directly to the public and government.

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Building Canada Fund - Communities Component

UPDATE
The program has approved 126 community projects totalling over $561 million, which represents over $175 million from the Government of Canada, over $175 million from the Province of British Columbia, and the remainder from local governments.

Applications for funding under the Building Canada Fund - Communities Component are no longer being accepted. The program received over 600 funding applications.

Twenty-five million dollars in BCF-CC funding remains to be allocated for Flood Mitigation projects. Future intake information will be posted on the website as soon as it is available.

As of April 12, 2010 when we posted this info.

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Towns for Tomorrow

From improving local water systems and rehabilitating sewers to upgrading area recreation centres and developing neighbourhood parks, British Columbia’s smaller communities are benefitting from the Towns for Tomorrow program. For a complete list of projects, visit the Funded Projects page.

Since 2007, a total of 154 Towns for Tomorrow projects have been funded across the province, helping B.C. communities act on their infrastructure needs, while creating jobs and supporting the economy.

The five-year, $71-million Towns for Tomorrow program is unique, providing up to 80 per cent of project funding for municipalities and regional districts with less than 5,000 residents, to a maximum contribution of $400,000. For communities of 5,000 to 15,000 residents, the program covers up to 75 per cent of eligible project costs, with a maximum contribution of $375,000.

Projects eligible for Towns for Tomorrow funding include, but are not limited to:

•water projects;
•wastewater projects;
•public transit projects;
•environmental energy improvement projects;
•local road projects;
•recreation and cultural projects;
•tourism projects;
•protective and emergency services infrastructure projects; and
•community development projects.

The application submission period for the 2009 round of funding is now closed and ALL SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS HAVE BEEN ANNOUNCED. Details for the next round are still being confirmed. Please check back for future information on the new deadline and application package.

For more information about the grants that are no longer available, please see the
 

Government Grants section at the
 Ministry of Community and Rural Development
Local Government Dept.

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We found this letter published in the Vernon Morning Star May 5, 2010 to be intelligent.

Restrictions (water) raise questions - Vernon Morning Star May 5, 2010

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Land Title Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 250
This Act is current to April 1, 2010

Division 4 — Approval of Subdivision Plans

Time limit for approval and consideration of public interest
85 (1) A subdivision plan must be approved or rejected by the approving officer within 2 months after the date it is tendered for examination and approval or within another period that may be set by the Lieutenant Governor in Council.

(2) If, under subsection (1), the approving officer rejects the subdivision plan, the approving officer must forthwith notify in writing the applicant, or the solicitor or agent of the applicant, of the rejection, stating briefly the reason and the approving officer's requirements, if any.

(3) In considering an application for subdivision approval in respect of land, the approving officer may refuse to approve the subdivision plan if the approving officer considers that the deposit of the plan is against the public interest.

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Local Government Grants Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 275

Contents
Section
1 Grants to local governments and related organizations
2 Repealed
3 Unconditional grants
4 Conditional grants
5 Grants to other bodies
6 Consultation with local governments
7 Power to make regulations
8 Transitional — authority to continue payments under former Acts

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Local Government Grants Act
Local Government Grants Regulations
[includes amendments up to B.C. Reg. 111/2009, March 13, 2009]

*This is only a snippet, please click link for entire Regulation*

Part 4 — Conditional Implementation Grants

Division 1 — Water and Sewage Infrastructure Grants

Eligibility
13 Any municipality, regional district or greater board may apply for a grant under this Division if it

(a) constructs water facilities
or sewage collection and disposal facilities, or

(b) contributes to the cost of constructing facilities that are operated on its behalf or for its benefit by another municipality, regional district or greater board.

Amount of grants
14 (1) The payment of any grant under this Division is subject to an appropriation.

(2) For a grant under this Division,

(a) the minimum amount of the grant is 25% of the capital cost of the facilities, and

(b) the maximum amount of the grant is 50% of the capital cost of the facilities.


(3) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 135/99, s. 6 (a).]

(4) As an exception to subsection (2), if the minister considers that there are insufficient funds appropriated to make a grant in accordance with those subsections, the minister may consider only part of the cost of the facilities as eligible for a grant.

[am. B.C. Reg. 135/99, s. 6.]

Conditions of grants
15 In addition to any terms and conditions established by the minister, a grant under this Part may be made on one or more of the following conditions:

(a) that, unless the facilities to which the grant relates are completed within the period or by the deadline specified by the minister at the time the grant is approved, or extended by the minister or an authorized official from time to time, the grant will not be paid or will be paid in a lesser amount;

(b) that the local government provides to the minister information and reports respecting the project to which the grant relates as requested by the minister.

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Division 5 — Special Grants

Classes of grants
25 The classes of conditional grants which may be made under this Division are as follows:

(a) special assistance grants, being grants to assist in the resolution of municipal or regional district problems that, in the opinion of the minister, are unusual or unique and for which the minister considers no other means of providing the assistance is available;

(b) regional district supplemental grants, being grants to assist in the provision of services in regional districts that are, in the opinion of the minister, sparsely populated and financially disadvantaged.

Eligibility
26 (1) Any municipality or regional district may apply for a special grant under section 25 (a) of this regulation.

(2) Any regional district may apply for a regional district supplemental grant under section 25 (b) of this regulation.

Amount of grants
27 (1) The payment of any grant under this Division is subject to an appropriation.

(2) The amount of a special grant under section 25 (a) of this regulation is in the discretion of the minister and may be made on one or more of the following bases:

(a) a fixed amount;

(b) a fixed amount per resident multiplied by the population of the jurisdiction;

(c) a percentage of the costs towards which the grant is being paid;

(d) an amount established in relation to assessment in the jurisdiction.

(3) The amount of a regional district supplemental grant under section 25 (b) of this regulation is in the discretion of the minister and may be made on the basis of either or both of the following, subject to the limit that the maximum amount of such a grant that may be paid to a regional district in any one fiscal year is 90% of the amount referred to in section 8 (a) of this regulation:

(a) a fixed amount;

(b) a percentage of the amount referred to in section 8 (a) of this regulation.

Conditions of grants
28 In addition to any terms and conditions established by the minister, a grant under this Division may be made on one or more of the following conditions:

(a) that all or some part of the grant is used for a purpose specified by the minister;

(b) that the local government provides to the minister information and reports respecting the use of the grant as requested by the minister.

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Local Services Act
Subdivision Regulations
[includes amendments up to B.C. Reg. 4/2010, January 14, 2010]

* This is only a snippett, please click link for entire Act *

Application
Where these regulations apply
1.01 These regulations apply to the subdivision of all land in the Province except land

(a) within a municipality,

(b) regulated by a bylaw under section 938 of the Municipal Act, and

Purpose
Purpose
2.01 The purpose of these regulations is to assist in assuring the safe, healthful, equitable, efficient, economical and attractive subdivision of land for the benefit of the community as a whole.

Regulations apply where there is no bylaw
1.03 Notwithstanding section 1.01 (b), where a bylaw does not regulate a matter covered by these regulations, these regulations apply to that matter.

[en. B.C. Reg. 424/87.]
 
Purpose
2.01 The purpose of these regulations is to assist in assuring the safe, healthful, equitable, efficient, economical and attractive subdivision of land for the benefit of the community as a whole.

Definitions
3.01 In these regulations, unless the context otherwise requires:

"approval" means approval in writing from the authority having jurisdiction; 

"building regulations" means regulation of construction of buildings by a building code adopted pursuant to the Local Services Act or to the Building Regulations Division of the Municipal Act; 1. R.S.B.C. 1960-255

"community water system" means a system of waterworks which serves 2 or more parcels and which is owned, operated and maintained by an improvement district under the Water Act or the Municipal Act, or a regional district, or which is regulated under the Water Utility Act;

"potable water" means water which is approved for drinking purposes by the medical health officer in accordance with the Health Act;

Other regulations
4.02 Nothing contained in these regulations shall relieve the owner of a subdivision from the responsibility to seek out and comply with the legislation applicable to his undertaking.

Community water systems
4.09 (1) The design of any community water system to serve the subdivision shall be in accordance with the requirements of any authority having jurisdiction over the system pursuant to

(a) the Health Act and the Water Utility Act,

(b) the Health Act and the Water Act, when an improvement district has an applicable subdivision bylaw pursuant to the Water Act, or

(c) the Health Act and the Municipal Act, when a regional district has an applicable bylaw setting out the terms and conditions of any extension to its community water system,

as the case may be.

(2) The community water system approved pursuant to section 4.09 (1) shall be installed as approved before the subdivision is approved.

(3) Notwithstanding the requirements of section 4.09 (2), a subdivision may be approved prior to the construction of the community water system, provided that an arrangement securing performance of such construction satisfactory to the approving officer has been made with

(a) the Comptroller of Water Rights (under the Water Utility Act),

(b) an improvement district having an applicable subdivision bylaw adopted pursuant to the Water Act, or

(c) a regional district having an applicable bylaw setting out the terms and conditions of any extension to its community water system,

as the case may be, but in no case shall the subdivision be approved before the plans for the community water system have been approved.

Water supply
4.11 Where a community water system is to be installed in a subdivision, a supply of potable water adequate to serve the subdivision shall be proven before the subdivision is approved.

"potable water" means water which is approved for drinking purposes by the medical health officer in accordance with the Health Act;

Access to navigable waters
5.06 When a subdivision borders on the shore of navigable waters, access shall be given in accordance with the requirements of the Land Title Act.

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Here is an article from the Vernon Morning Star letters section of March 21, 2010 that we thought was a good article.

Water woes has serious consequences for agriculture and mid to lower income families.

Water Woes - Increase in water cost has serious consequences.

Gyula Kiss excellent blog

http://coldstreamernews.blogspot.com/

concerning this rate increase, water issues generally, and what other communities are paying.

Check out this article on sustainability that is posted at coldstreamernews.blogspot.com.  There is some red printing added to the side of the article by coldstreamer, that we thought was well written.

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Water concerns directed to city
Vernon Morning Star - By Brent Mutis - March 25, 2010

In the ongoing controversy over increased water fees, Coldstream council is encouraging anyone concerned about increased water rates to take their case to the City of Vernon.

Ted Osborn, who represents the agricultural community on water issues, addressed council and said farmers in the area face uncertain times given the nine per cent rate increase approved recently by the North Okanagan Regional District board.

“If anyone wants to invest in agriculture in this community, they have very little reliance on water rates in the future,” said Osborn.

But the district’s representative at the last NORD meeting, Gyula Kiss, voted in favour of the increase, saying the budget would have passed without his vote anyway.

“Water is only part of the budget. If I am the only one voting (against), it’s like I’m grandstanding,” he said.

“You don’t want to do that.”

He believes the decreased amount of water currently available will produce too little revenue.

“In order to meet the required money, we need to sell domestic water to the tune of 8.2 million cubic metres,” said Kiss. “This is going to be a drought year. I am questioning if we’d be able to get enough (water to sell).”

The unpredictable nature of the water resource makes it harder to address in a budget, says Kiss.

He added that dry conditions leading to water restrictions mean the tax increase is the best option at a time when more water revenue is needed.

“It’s not easy to cover all the water expenses when you want to reduce water consumption but at same time cover budget shortfalls,” he said.

Coun. Richard Enns still assured Osborn Coldstream is behind him.

“You have the support of the council of Coldstream,” said Enns, adding more heat needs to be put on Vernon.

“You need to raise your concerns with them. This is a serious problem.”

There are three Vernon councillors that have votes at NORD.

“It’s really the council of the City of Vernon that we need to convince,” said Coun. Doug Dirk. “That’s where some of the pressure should go.”

Osborn had last week expressed frustration with the representatives of Areas B and C and Coldstream, districts with significant agriculture, because the water rate increase passed at at the regional district unanimously.

The rate hike is needed to pay for the operation of the Duteau Creek treatment plant. But Osborn noted agricultural users don’t need treated water.

“Quality is not an issue with lake water,” he said.

The increase means $19 more per hectare for farmers, up from the $212 already being paid.

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Farmers furious over higher water rates
Vernon Morning Star - By Richard Rolke - March 11, 2010

Farmers say they are being unfairly tapped by higher water costs.

The Greater Vernon Advisory Committee was told Thursday that an across-the-board nine per cent hike in water rates goes against an agreement that agricultural customers would only be billed for improvements to water quantity and pressure, not quality.

“We take exception to costs being loaded on to agriculture that aren’t necessary,” said Ted Osborn, the agricultural director on the GVAC board.

GVAC, through the North Okanagan Regional District, recently announced that all water customers will pay nine per cent more in 2010.

One of the primary reasons for the increase is to pay for the new Duteau Creek treatment plant debt and operation of the facility.

However, Osborn says the Duteau Creek plant is for improving water quality, something that’s not required for irrigating crops or looking after livestock.

“We take great exception that agricultural rates will be increased by nine per cent,” he said.

“Agricultural only agreed to the cost of living.”

The average flate rate for an agricultural customer is $212 per hectare a year. A nine per cent increase in rates would generate an additional $19 per hectare a year.

David Sewell, finance general manager, believes some of the nine per cent increase in revenue will benefit farmers.

“Some are for quantity and pressure and maintenance of the system now and in the future,” he said.

Osborn’s concerns have also created challenges because the water utility’s budget is expected to be adopted by the NORD board Wednesday.

“Any decision to deviate from the nine per cent will have financial implications (for the budget),” said Sewell.

In the end, GVAC directors passed a motion asking the regional district board to ensure the increase in water rates reflects improvements to water quantity and pressure.

“We want to ensure we’re following the principles of the master water plan,” said director Buffy Baumbrough.

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Is that fair to NOT allow residential property owners hardship exemptions from a subdivision servicing requirement, and only permit hardship exemptions for agricultural or industrial use.

Local Government Act
This Act is Current to March 10, 2010
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 323
Part 26 — Planning and Land Use Management
Division 6 — Board of Variance

Variance or exemption to relieve hardship

901 (1) A person may apply to a board of variance for an order under subsection (2) if the person alleges that compliance with any of the following would cause the person hardship:

(d) a subdivision servicing requirement under section 938 (1) (c) in an area zoned for agricultural or industrial use.

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Local Government Act
This Act is Current to March 10, 2010
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 323
Part 26 — Planning and Land Use Management
Division 6 — Board of Variance

938 (1) A local government may, by bylaw, regulate and require the provision of works and services in respect of the subdivision of land, and for that purpose may, by bylaw, do one or more of the following:

(a) regulate and prescribe minimum standards for the dimensions, locations, alignment and gradient of highways in connection with subdivisions of land;

(b) require that, within a subdivision, highways, sidewalks, boulevards, boulevard crossings, transit bays, street lighting or underground wiring be provided, and be located and constructed in accordance with the standards established by the bylaw;

(c) require that, within a subdivision, a water distribution system, a fire hydrant system, a sewage collection system, a sewage disposal system, a drainage collection system or a drainage disposal system be provided, located and constructed in accordance with the standards established in the bylaw.

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Westside Road Residents Information Meetings

The Regional District of Central Okanagan is holding two information meetings that will be of interest to residents living along Westside Road in areas from Trader’s Cove to Westshore Estates.

Staff from the Environmental Services section will be on hand to provide information and updates regarding rates and several projects including water systems and solid waste management.

The first meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, April 14th from 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Killiney Beach Community Hall (514 Udell Road). Information will be provided on the following topics:

Upper Fintry/Valley of the Sun/Shalal Road water system
A petition process regarding the Fintry Utility water system;
Planned improvements and upgrades to the Killiney Beach and Westshore water systems;
Utility billing rate increases for Solid Waste Management and Recycling programs at the Sugar Loaf Transfer Station;
Westside Landfill Closure and temporary residential convenience solid waste transfer and recycling facility.

The second meeting is scheduled for Thursday, April 22nd from 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Wilson Landing Fire Hall (2396 Westside Road). At this meeting residents will learn more from the Regional Waste Reduction Office about:

Utility billing rates for Solid Waste management and Recycling programs at the Trader’s Cove Transfer Station;
Westside Landfill Closure and temporary residential convenience solid waste transfer and recycling facility.
Information from each meeting will be made available after each meeting on the Regional District website.

(February 12, 2010)

Source http://www.regionaldistrict.com/whatsnew.aspx

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February 22, 2010 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Agenda

.pdf icon Item 7.1 Feasibility Study - Fintry Utilities Water System.pdf

.pdf icon Item 7.2 Utility Acquisition Policy.pdf

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December 14, 2009 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Agenda's

.pdf icon Item 6.11 RDCO Water Systems Water Fees and Regulation Bylaw.pdf

.pdf icon Item 6.12 RDCO Water Systems-Community Works Funding.pdf

.pdf icon Item 3.1 Okanagan Basin Water Board Recommended Drought Proofing Actions.pdf

.pdf icon Item 4.1 Okanagan Basin Water Board Governance Manual.pdf

.pdf icon Item 9.1 Okanagan Basin Water Board Information Item.pdf

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The Ministry expects that water rates should be in the range of $35 to $55 per month for each domestic service equivalent. However, rates in BC are often below this range, and there is growing evidence that even $55 is too low, given requirements for asset replacement!

http://lacasaowners.com/files/5/1/3/0/5/159868-150315/Water_BC_News.pdf

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Managing underground water often lacks long-range view
Kelowna Capital News - By Judie Steeves - March 18, 2010

Although it’s mostly surface water we see and hear about, there’s a lot of use of underground sources of water in the Okanagan Valley.

But there needs to be proper management of the resource, commented Remi Allard, president of the B.C. Groundwater Association, a hydrogeologist and groundwater engineer who also owns Sustainable Subsurface Solutions of Kelowna.

The association is holding its 40th annual general meeting in Kelowna this week, discussing both technical and trade issues, from safe well drilling to aquifer testing.

People in B.C. feel water is a right and it’s often taken for granted, Allard said.

But, he says in parts of the Okanagan Valley the water balance hasn’t been well-monitored and development has occurred without a long-range view.

One of the initiatives the association is involved in is the Groundwater Advisory Board to the provincial government, and there have been meetings with provincial officials on the Water Act modernization process that’s currently underway as well.

One of the goals of that process is regulation of groundwater extraction, its use in priority areas of the province and for large withdrawals.

But licensing of groundwater is not an issue everyone in the association agrees on.

“There’ll always be a reluctance to move toward licensing,” said Allard, although he admits that personally, as a hydrogeologist, he recognizes the importance of measuring in order to manage the resource.

“Having more information is important,” he said. “But there are concerns about too much regulation and about government becoming too involved. For one thing, it’s expensive.”

Allard says there have been a lot of changes in the association in its four decades.

It began as an association of drillers, a practical organization, but has evolved to include both practical and more technical discussions, and everyone involved in the groundwater industry. Its 200 members hail from all around the province.

The association represents well drillers, pump installers, hydrogeologists and other technical people as well as manufacturers and suppliers, and government regulators.

And, Allard feels water purveyors should also be involved.

Although they have their own association, the B.C. Water and Waste Association, he said groundwater is not well understood.

Yet, most local irrigation districts rely on wells for at least a portion of their water supply, and one, the Rutland Irrigation District, relies entirely on a system of wells.

As well, one system in Peachland is based on wells, as are utilities in Winfield, Lumby, Silver Star and Armstrong.

jsteeves "at" kelownacapnews.com

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Information lacking on valley’s water flow
Vernon Morning Star - March 16, 2010

You can’t manage what you can’t measure.

But, the Okanagan’s network of hydrometric stations measuring the amount of water flowing in streams throughout the Okanagan Basin’s watersheds, was dismantled in the 1980s and 1990s as a budget-cutting measure by the federal government. A total of 156 such stations were discontinued.

That lack of current information can lead to problems managing water in the valley.

Hydrologist Don Dobson has been assessing and reporting on water in the Okanagan Basin for all levels of government, water utilities and industry for a number of decades and he made a plea to members of the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council.

He warned that without re-instating an adequate hydrometric network, we could be making decisions based on erroneous data.

“If precipitation patterns are changing and we use old data, we’re basing our decisions on mistaken assumptions,” explained Dobson.

In fact, with significant watershed changes due to wildfire, pine beetle-ravaged timber and other climate change-related effects, he warned we are probably already doing some of that.

What’s needed is the re-activitation of 65 of those stations and creation of 28 new ones, to add to the 25 active Water Survey of Canada stations and the 32 operated by others, such as by water utilities, he told the council. That would bring the network up to 150 stations.

He’d like to convince the Okanagan Basin Water Board, to which the stewardship council reports, to take the lead in establishing a new regional system of hydrology stations to be operated in the basin.

Without federal or provincial funds, it’s likely going to be up to local government to take care of it, he commented.

He estimated that for $515,000 it would be possible to build enough stations, and for a further $750,000 annually, to operate them.

“It looks daunting,” he admitted, but he said already most water utilities in the valley maintain several upland stations, so if the data from those was gathered by staff but made available in a central archive, that cost could drop substantially.

“We should begin by identifying existing stations,” he said.

, and encourage water suppliers to establish or re-establish stations.

The OWSC, a technical advisory body to the OBWB, which is made up of regional district directors from throughout the basin, agreed to appoint a sub-committee to hammer out a proposal for the OBWB.

Chairman Bernie Bauer agreed it’s important the basin be self-sufficient in measuring water throughout the watershed so that water management decisions are based on current information.

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Director fears utility shortfall
Vernon Morning Star - By Richard Rolke - March 13, 2010

One politician is concerned water utility revenue could evaporate under strict restrictions.

The North Okanagan Regional District is already forecasting tight conservation rules this summer because of a dry winter, but director Gyula Kiss insists that could undermine money generated by user fees.

“The consequences of this will significantly impact our budget,” he said.

“We’re going to conserve water but there are fiscal consequences.”

Kiss believes stage two restrictions — irrigating twice a week — could lead to a $2 million deficit.

“How will we recover that?” he said.

Beyond stage three restrictions (once a week) and stage four (no watering) possibly worsening the situation, Kiss says higher utility fees could lead to less consumption, forcing revenue down even further.

Staff aren’t convinced there will be a problem.

“It’s not our expectation that we will see a significant revenue decline because of increased rates,” said David Sewell, finance general manager.

If a deficit were to occur, Sewell says a plan would be created to cover that situation and one possible option would be reserves.

Kiss believes user fees create competing objectives between income and conservation, so taxation should be used for capital improvements.

“We would have a fixed part of the budget covered by taxation,” he said.

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Water supply data is lacking
Kelowna Capital News - By Judie Steeves - March 12, 2010

Hydrologist Don Dobson said a lack of accurate information could lead to improper managing our water resource in the Okanagan Valley.  Capital News File

You can’t manage what you can’t measure.

But, the Okanagan’s network of hydrometric stations measuring the amount of water flowing in streams throughout the Okanagan Basin’s watersheds, was dismantled in the 1980s and ‘90s as a budget-cutting measure by the federal government. A total of 156 such stations were discontinued.

That lack of current information can lead to problems managing water in the valley.

Hydrologist Don Dobson has been assessing and reporting on water in the Okanagan basin for all levels of government, water utilities and industry for a number of decades and he made a plea to members of the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council Thursday.

He warned that without re-instating an adequate hydrometric network, we could be making decisions based on erroneous data. “If precipitation patterns are changing and we use old data, we’re basing our decisions on mistaken assumptions.”

In fact, with significant watershed changes due to wildfire, pine beetle-ravaged timber and other climate change-related effects, he warned we are probably already doing some of that.

What’s needed is the re-activation of 65 of those stations and creation of 28 new ones, to add to the 25 active Water Survey of Canada stations and the 32 operated by others, such as by water utilities, he told the council. That would bring the network up to 150 stations.

He’d like to convince the Okanagan Basin Water Board, to which the stewardship council reports, to take the lead in establishing a new regional system of hydrology stations to be operated in the basin.

Without federal or provincial funds, it’s likely going to be up to local government to take care of it, he commented.

He estimated that for $515,000 it would be possible to build enough stations, and for a further $750,000 annually, to operate them.

“It looks daunting,” he admitted, but he said already most water utilities in the valley maintain several upland stations, so if the data from those was gathered by staff but made available in a central archive, that cost could drop substantially.

“We should begin by identifying existing stations,” he said, and encourage water suppliers to establish or re-establish stations. The OWSC, a technical advisory body to the OBWB, which is made up of regional district directors from throughout the basin, agreed to appoint a sub-committee to hammer out a proposal. Chairman Bernie Bauer agreed it’s important the basin be self-sufficient in measuring water throughout the watershed so that water management decisions are based on current information.

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CORD looks at water utility
Vernon Morning Star  - By Richard Rolke - February 25, 2010

Rising costs could force the Central Okanagan Regional District to take over a water utility.

Several property owners have asked CORD to absorb the private utility at Fintry on the west side of Okanagan Lake.

“In 2012, there will be some government standards coming down for water systems and my understanding is it’s become too expensive for them to carry on,” said Jim Edgson, North Okanagan director.

The utility was formed when the Fintry subdivision was developed in 1965. Presently, it provides domestic water to 81 properties, including the gate house for Fintry Provincial Park.

CORD staff have already identified some inadequacies with the utility.

“The water system is supplied with six fire hydrants, although at a mere 12,000 gallons, the reservoir is undersized and unable to provide the minimum storage (24,000 gallons) and flow requirements as mandated by the fire underwriter,” said Delphine Maja, senior engineering technologist, in a written report.

“The water system has received minimal capital upgrades in its 45 years of operation and at the very least, in 2012 when the new requirements for small water systems come into effect, the users will be plagued with the high costs associated with the necessary improvements to the lake intake and reservoir as well as the addition of a secondary form of water treatment.”

As a result of the request, the regional district will spend up to $40,000 in feasibility funds to conduct an assessment of the utility, possible upgrades that may be required and the financial impact on the property owners.

Edgson believes the timing for such a study may be ideal because the district is presently looking at how to meet the domestic water needs of the Upper Fintry, Valley of the Sun and Shalal Road subdivisions along the northern portion of Westside Road.

“We could have one big system and create some savings. There could be huge efficiencies,” he said.

However, he added that any plan for CORD to take over the private utility at Fintry will ultimately depend on the impacted residents giving their approval.

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Water board receives funding
Vernon Morning Star - February 06, 2010

New funding will allow the Okanagan Basin Water Board to develop policy that will help address water needs in the region.

The OBWB will receive $298,000 from Natural Resources Canada over three years, matched by $331,850 in cash and in-kind contributions through the OBWB and various B.C. agencies.

“The Okanagan valley has among the highest drought risk in Canada, with some of the fastest population growth, and an economy that is heavily dependent on water for agriculture, tourism and retirement industries,” said Anna Warwick Sears, executive director.

“Despite the known risks, very little work has been done to ensure the reliability of supplies for the future – until now.”

Between 2007 and 2009, the federal government invested heavily in phase two of the Okanagan water supply and demand project, with more than $1.1 million in cash contributions towards the $2.5 million budget total.

The goal of phase two was to provide an up-to-date scientific assessment of current water availability in the Okanagan basin, and how it will be impacted by population growth and climate change in the near future. Phase 2 will be completed and launched in March 2010.

“After three years of intense study of water issues in the Okanagan, we are getting a handle on what climate change and population growth will bring,” said Warwick Sears.

“We’re thrilled with this funding. It will take us to the next step – finding solutions to address these issues.”

Phase three will use the phase two science to modernize water policy in the Okanagan, and communicate facts about water to the public and elected leaders. Phase three will also make the data and models available for valley-wide regional and local government planning.

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Director fears utility shortfall
Vernon Morning Star - By Richard Rolke - March 13, 2010

One politician is concerned water utility revenue could evaporate under strict restrictions.

The North Okanagan Regional District is already forecasting tight conservation rules this summer because of a dry winter, but director Gyula Kiss insists that could undermine money generated by user fees.

“The consequences of this will significantly impact our budget,” he said.

“We’re going to conserve water but there are fiscal consequences.”

Kiss believes stage two restrictions — irrigating twice a week — could lead to a $2 million deficit.

“How will we recover that?” he said.

Beyond stage three restrictions (once a week) and stage four (no watering) possibly worsening the situation, Kiss says higher utility fees could lead to less consumption, forcing revenue down even further.

Staff aren’t convinced there will be a problem.

“It’s not our expectation that we will see a significant revenue decline because of increased rates,” said David Sewell, finance general manager.

If a deficit were to occur, Sewell says a plan would be created to cover that situation and one possible option would be reserves.

Kiss believes user fees create competing objectives between income and conservation, so taxation should be used for capital improvements.

“We would have a fixed part of the budget covered by taxation,” he said.

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Homeowners see water rates escalate
Kelowna Capital News - By Judie Steeves - January 19, 2010

Homeowners within most of the South East Kelowna Irrigation District will be paying $114 more per year for water this year, about a third more than they did last year.

Other than in the Hall Road area of SEKID, where they will pay $519 a year, residents will pay $399 annually, in order that funds can be set aside for future water quality improvements estimated at $18 million. Wells are the main source of water in the Hall Road area.

Manager Toby Pike admitted it’s a big cost increase for residential customers, but he said, “We’ve been warning people to get ready for this. We’re working toward compliance with Interior Health requirements for improved water quality.”

A dedicated portion of this year’s payments for water will go into a fund for capital projects such as those required to bring water quality up to the standard required by IH, he said.

“We need to improve our water quality. The only point on which I disagree with IH is on the degree of urgency for those improvements,” commented Pike.

As well, the district plans to offer land for sale, including a 10-acre parcel of property it owns from a tax sale in the 1930s, which is expected to add $2 million or so to the improvement fund.

He admitted he has heard from some customers about the rate increase, but he defended it, saying it’s only a dollar a day.

“What would you do without it? Water was too cheap to begin with. This is not an exorbitant cost.”

“There are lots of other things people pay more for that are not as vital as water,” he commented.

Normally, the rates are set by the board to cover operating costs and leave enough to put towards keeping the infrastructure in shape, but there is a huge cost to bringing the system into line with health regulations, he said.

Although some water purveyors haven’t yet approved rates for the coming year, some are based on a metered rate while others are flat rate.

A survey of local water systems showed the SEKID rates for this year would not be the highest in the Central Okanagan for 2010.

District of Lake Country homeowners pay about $455 a year if they are not metered, or $395, plus a metered rate. In the Glenmore Ellison Improvement District, they pay about $400 for both taxes and tolls, an increase of two to three per cent over last year.

In the Westbank Irrigation District, homeowners will go to a metered rate this year. Right now the toll and tax combined work out to charges of $430 a year for a single family home.

In the Black Mountain Irrigation District, the charge is $372 annually, while in Peachland, residents pay either $283.24 and $319.75, depending on which of the two water systems they’re in, Trepanier or Peachland (Deep) Creek. In the Lakeview Irrigation District, homeowners pay a total of $277 a year.

Rutland Waterworks, which relies on a system of wells rather than on surface water, charges $267 a year.

Kelowna residents, who pay based on metered rates that are on a sliding scale to encourage water conservation, pay a low of $202 annually—up to $240.96 with use of 50 cubic metres a month and $622.68 with use of more than 125 cubic metres a month.

In West Kelowna, the new municipality has just taken over operation of three water systems from the regional district, but will take over the Lakeview and Westbank Irrigation Districts in the coming year.

Of the three it currently manages, residents in the West Kelowna Estates area pay $298.04; Pritchard residents pay $220.76 and Sunnyside residents pay a combination of metered and flat rates that works out to about $280 a year.

jsteeves "at" kelownacapnews.com

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Reviewing water regulations
Kelowna Capital News - By Judie Steeves - January 15, 2010

Limits have been placed on growth in some areas of Alberta under a new water act completed in 1999.

There are no new water licences being issued for at least one water basin, the south Saskatchewan, because its water has already been over-allocated, according to John Thompson.

Because B.C. has just embarked on a review of its century-old water act legislation, the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council invited him to speak at Thursday’s meeting as one of the people who helped draft Alberta’s new act.

Thompson told council members that under the new water act, government can decide not to accept new applications for water licences in a basin where all the water is already fully allocated, including conservation flows to protect the environment.

The South Saskatchewan River basin, which includes the Oldman, Red Deer and Bow River Basins, is in a crisis, similar to the Okanagan Valley, Thompson told council members.

It includes the cities of Calgary, Airdrie, Medicine Hat, Red Deer and Lethbridge.

Thompson said it took seven years to draft new legislation, including a public consultation period that was quite an eye-opener, he said.

They found that many people needed to be educated first on the existing legislation governing water before they could make intelligent comments on the proposed new legislation.

One of the major changes that was included in the new legislation was allowing water licenses to be transferred, as long as both parties could come to an agreement and it wouldn’t result in any adverse impact on other users or the environment.

Fundamentally, the old legislation was very similar to that in B.C., with the concept of Crown-owned water; and that licensees’ rights are based on a seniority system, where those holding the oldest licences, have the first priority when there’s not enough water to go around.

It’s called ‘first in time; first in right’ and is often referred to as FITFIR. Thompson said it also functions as a drought management tool.

He conceded that water sharing may be a better way to manage low water supplies overall, but he said the big flaw is it only takes one uncooperative user for that system to not work.

An issue that he warned will come up here in B.C. as the demand for water increases, is that senior licence holders will use more of their allocation and junior licence holders (those who were issued licences more recently ) “will get hammered.”

Despite all the water management plans and the discussions and new legislation, he said Alberta is still not meeting the water requirements for the environment.

A big difference between water law in B.C. and Alberta is that in B.C., groundwater is not yet licensed.

There, he said, there’s been a move toward those underground sources of water, and now government is not only looking at governing it with licenses, but also real-time monitoring of compliance with those licences.

“We need aquifer plans. You can only put so many straws in a milkshake,” he added.

He also said they have enforcement staff to ensure the new legislation is being followed, and he admitted they sometimes have to wear bulletproof vests. “Water is a very emotional issue,” he explained.

Attending the council meeting, in addition to representatives from provincial and federal environment ministries, was MLA John Slater, who is the parliamentary secretary for Water Supply and Allocation to the Minister of Environment.

He said B.C. has four main goals in a new water act: protecting stream health and aquatic environments; improving water governance; getting more flexibility and efficiency into the system; and regulating groundwater use.

For more information about the process, and to participate, go to: http://blog.gov.bc.ca/livingwatersmart/

jsteeves "at" kelownacapnews.com

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Prorogation seeps into Day’s address to Rotary
Kelowna Capital News - By Jason Luciw - January 12, 2010

Okanagan Coquihalla MP Stockwell Day couldn’t escape the prorogation of Parliament and Afghan detainee issues during a Westbank Rotary Club dinner meeting on Monday night.

While Day’s speech focused primarily on the economy and Canada’s efforts to expand free trade agreements, the Conservative government’s decision to suspend Parliament until after the 2010 Vancouver/Whistler 2010 Winter Olympics was brought up during a question and answer session following the MP’s address.

West Kelowna resident Barb Harris raised the issue.

“It smacks of thumbing your nose at Parliament when committees that are meeting are in the middle of something and then all of a sudden it’s all wiped out,” Harris told Day.

“It also seems to me the Prime Minister’s Office is thumbing its nose at the electorate.”

Afterwards, Harris told the media that she believed Prime Minister Stephen Harper prorogued Parliament because he didn’t like the way a committee was proceeding on the Afghan detainee controversy, which alleges Canadian soldiers handed prisoners over to authorities, knowing they could be tortured.

Day continued to deny the allegations made against his government.

“Canadian soldiers do not hand over child killers or even alleged child killers, which is what the Taliban are, to torture,” Day later told media.

As for his response to Harris, the MP told the woman that the prorogation amounted to a two to three week delay in Parliamentary procedures, given that the House would have taken a break for the Olympics to begin with.

Day also noted that he went door to door on the Westside earlier in the day Monday and only one person raised the issue out of about 60 homes he visited.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper stated that he would prorogue Parliament until March 3 to accommodate budget preparations, instead of returning as planned on Jan. 25.

As for the budget, Day repeated Prime Minster Stephen Harper’s Jan. 11 stated position that the 2010 budget would contain no new stimulus spending.

Day added his belief that Canada must be cognizant of its debt to the Gross Domestic Product ratio.

“We cannot indefinitely continue deficit spending. There is a limit to which we can bring the country into debt. We have to be very careful about that and that’s what the Prime Minister is saying.”


During his speech to Rotary, Day said the United States’ propensity for deficit spending is very troubling.

“If a country is really going into debt in an aggressive way, that usually means at the very least you’re going to have to pay the piper at some point. That means interest rates will go up or—worse than that—inflation will go up. The U.S. is our friend and we get along great but I am very concerned with their percentage of debt to GDP.”

Day, who serves as minister of international trade, said Canada must continue to expand free trade opportunities with other countries to ensure this nation continues on the road to economic recovery.

“We will be effected if there is inflationary spiral in the U.S. That’s why we’re trying to be very aggressive (clearing) up these international trade wars so that your products and services…can get to other countries with as little possible added government tax and regulation on top of it.”

As part of those ongoing efforts, Day noted he would be in Cuba for “aggressive trade negotiations later this month”

jluciw "at" kelownacapnews.com

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Water an issue in Westside
by Castanet Staff - Story: 40727 - Jul 28, 2008

At least one Westside resident has taken issue with comments made by Mayor Rosalind Neis concerning the availability of water in the municipality.

Neis, responding to a story about the lack of water in Joe Rich, indicated there was no cause for concern in Westside.

"We have the benefit of the reserve lakes. I think we are in a little different situation than in Joe Rich," says Neis.

"If I am correct, they rely a lot on groundwater."

Glenrosa resident, Ken Hansen, says nothing could be further from the truth in the upper Glenrosa area.

Hansen has four acres of property on McKellar Road on the south side of Glenrosa Road.

He says he was surprised Neis wasn't aware of the situation facing some residents in the Glenrosa area.

"There's been many discussions over the years with local politicians, some of them that are on the council now, and I would have thought she would have known about it," says Hansen.

"There was a letter sent to her, but I have no way of knowing if it ever got to her."

Hansen says some residents don't have any water at all. He says they have to truck it in every day.

"I'm not as bad as most, I have enough water to live on. I can't water my lawn or wash my car. If I put my sprinklers on for half an hour, then nobody can have a shower the next day."

Nearly 100 homes are on well water in the area and Hansen says, as is the case in Joe Rich, new wells tend to have a trickle down effect.

"When you drill a well and create a new cavity for that water to run into, it's not that uncommon for the neighbour next door to all of a sudden have theirs go empty. There has not been a lot of consideration given to that."

Hansen says he had to double the size of his well when he first moved into his house more than 10 years ago.

He says his well is 500 feet deep.

"I think there's one or two that might be down to 700 feet. You just never know with ground water, where it's coming from and where it's going."

Hansen says he doesn't have all the answers or solutions, but says a plan by Westside Irrigation to run water lines along Glenrosa Road about five years ago was apparently scrapped.

"They were going to upgrade their system and run new pipeline to Glenrosa. The plan was to run it down Glenrosa Road. They didn't necessarily promise to give water to the residents in this area, but at least the line would have been a couple of blocks away."

That plan was scrapped because of cost.

Westside Councillor, Carol Zanon, also a member of the WBID Board, says the issue is something the municipality will eventually have to deal with.

"It's an issue council will have to focus on, but just when it's going to reach the agenda, I don't know," says Zanon.

She says shutting down development in the municipality until more studies are done, is being suggested in Joe Rich as one possibility, but is unlikely.

"This is a municipal issue and it will come up. Remember, the water boards will be taken in by the municipality by December 31, 2010."

Zanon adds financing a pipeline will be costly.

"Maybe it could be done in conjunction with other projects that may materialize between now and then, and then there would be different proposals put forward and I think we could put a lot of thought into analyzing those."

She says her best guess is that the issue will be part of the mandate of the next municipal council.

Hansen hopes something can be done soon, if not for himself, then for those who are struggling to get water to their property.

"I feel bad for the people that moved up here, bought a house, have a well or had a well that was producing sufficient water, then all of a sudden, they don't. They can't even sell their house now."

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Floodgates open on grants to conserve or improve water
Kelowna Capital News- December 17, 2009

The Okanagan Basin Water Board is looking for applicants as it rolls out this year’s Water Conservation and Quality Improvement Grant Program.

Eligible recipients include local governments (regional districts or municipalities), non-profit community groups, and irrigation or improvement districts.

As part of the process, all grant applicants must submit a council or board resolution from local government, endorsing their application.

Successful applicants can receive up to $30,000 for their project, with a total of $300,000 available, noted Genevieve Dunbar, grants administrator for the OBWB.

“We want projects that are tangible, on-the-ground works, that address conserving water or improving its quality,” Dunbar said.

“Applicants should show how their project will help the valley adapt to climate change and fluctuations in annual water supply.

“We are especially looking for applications that complement our latest projects, like Drought Response Planning, Education and Outreach, and the Sustainable Water Strategy,” continued Dunbar.

“In the past, we’ve provided grants to some fantastic initiatives, like a water audit of small businesses, a xeriscape education and outreach program, and a project to map the shoreline of local lakes.

“Every year we look forward to seeing what new and innovative ideas come in to our office.”

The Water Conservation and Quality Improvement Grant Program is in its fifth year and has granted over $1.4 million to 78 projects.

This year’s application deadline is Friday, Feb. 19, 2010. Information on the application process, including the need for a board or council resolution of support, as well as the application, can be found at www.obwb.ca/application/.

For more information contact Genevieve Dunbar at 250-469-6270 or email genevieve.dunbar "at" obwb.ca. For more information on the Okanagan Basin Water Board and its programs, check out the website www.obwb.ca

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Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Agenda December 14, 2009

Agenda No: 6.12

DEVELOPMENT & ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT REPORT

TO: Chair & Members of the Regional Board
FROM: Chris Radford, Infrastructure Services Coordinator
DATE: December 14, 2009
SUBJECT: Regional District Water Systems - Community Works Funding
LOCATION: Central Okanagan Electoral East and Central Okanagan Electoral Area West

RECOMMENDATION:

1. THAT the Board authorizes staff to proceed with the required proposal requests for water system engineering review and reports on the regional water systems as identified in the attached proposal.

2. AND THAT the Board authorizes staff to include the proposed funding for inclusion in the 2010 budget
review process.

3. AND FURTHER THAT the Board endorses Regional Water System upgrade applications to Gas Tax Funding - Strategic Priorities Fund and Innovations Fund when the next uptake for application process is advertised.

PURPOSE:

To utilize a portion Gas Tax Funds received in the electoral areas to improve water quality, implement water demand management, improve overall efficiency and form frameworks/plans required for subsequent funding applications on Regional water systems.

BACKGROUND:

The water systems do not hold adequate reserve funds at the present time to meet proposed improvements identified. The water system reviews will establish upgrade requirements, construction costs estimates and form a comprehensive development plan to set a framework for user fees and fee structures for required capital replacement and asset management. Currently the Gas Tax -Community Works fund comprises of- COE $261,282 and COW $488,381.

DEVELOPMENT & ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES STAFF COMMENTS:

The implementation of monitoring and control devices and installation of residential water meters on the Regional water systems will reinforce RDCO's commitment to foster water quality stewardship in the Okanagan.

Comprehensive plans will form framework for capital improvements and establish a funding strategy to be incorporated into the 5 year Financial Plan.

Respectfully submitted,

Chris Radford, AScT
Infrastructure Services Coordinator

Dan Plamondon, Manager Development & Environmental Services

Proposal for Water System Improvements utilizing Community Works Fund - Gas Tax Funding

continued ... click on the link above

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Project Name:  Upper Fintry, Shalal Road, Valley of the Sun Water System

File Number: 5600-20-15

Start Date: Under Design

Substantial Completion Date: October 2011

Number of Units: 341 residential parcels

Project Cost: (estimated): $5,936,000

Unit Cost: Not to exceed $17,500 per residential unit

Taxation/Unit/Year: Depends on interest rate at time of borrowing. Based on 30 year amortization:
  • $1,200 per unit per year (estimated)

Costs to Connect: (based on today's rates and subject to change)

  • Application Fee: $200.00

  • Building Permit Fee: $150.00 ($50.00 is refunded once connection is approved) (Why would they charge $50 if they give it back... what is the point?  This $100 fee is another government grab and more unnecessary paperwork)

  • Water Meter: $440.00

  • Plus, all on-site costs to connect the existing residence to the service connection at the property line are the responsibility of the owner.

Source: .pdf icon Regional District of Central Okanagan

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.pdf icon March 23, 2009 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes (Pg. 9-10)

6.4 b) Report regarding Killiney Beach Water System

Staff report dated March 12, 2009 outlined the need for upgrades to the Killiney Beach Water System to ensure adequate storage, efficiency and capacity to meet demands. Previous analysis have identified upgrades to the system and as a result of the system review, a phasing strategy will be implemented based on priority and cost of projects.

BAKER/FIELDING
THAT the Regional Board endorse an application to Building Canada Fund Communities Component for required upgrades to the Killiney Beach Water System.

CARRIED

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The quashing period is over

It looks as though the bylaws have come back with statutory approval and have been adopted in a special Regional Board meeting on May 14, 2009.  The quashing period started after the bylaws are adopted and lasts for one month.  If these bylaws were adopted on May 14, 2009, then the quashing period ends June 14, 2009.

.pdf icon Regional Board of Regional District of Central Okanagan agenda May 14, 2009 SpecMtg.pdf
This first link shows you the May 14, 2009 meeting was to adopt the bylaws.

.pdf icon Item 1.1 RDCO Bylaw No. 1254.pdf

.pdf icon Item 1.2 RDCO Bylaw No. 1255.pdf

.pdf icon Item 1.3 RDCO Bylaw No. 1257.pdf

.pdf icon Item 1.4 RDCO Bylaw No. 1258.pdf

If this special Regional Board meeting held May 14, 2009 shown at the links above, was to pass third readings on the water system bylaws, then what was the other Regional Board meeting held on March 23, 2009 for then, shown at the link below.

March 23, 2009 Regional Board Meeting

.pdf icon Agenda - March 23, 2009.pdf

.pdf icon Item 6.4 a) Proposed Domestic Water System.pdf

Delphine Maja the Engineering Tech from RDCO wrote down on a piece of paper that the March 23, 2009 Regional Board meeting at the link above was to pass first - third readings on the bylaws.  RDCO Engineering Tech also wrote that after 3rd reading, the bylaws are sent to Victoria for statutory approval which may take 4-8 weeks and that the bylaws probably won't be adopted until June 22, 2009 Regular Board meeting after the bylaws return from Victoria with statutory approval.  It looks like the quashing period may have started already.

More on this story

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About proposed water system petition

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Have your toe nails or hair examined to see if your well or drinking water contains arsenic?

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About Water System Wells and Water Witchers
(contact info for water witcher here)

Regional District of Central Okanagan Water Systems User Fee and Maintenance Fee Rate Table 1994 - present

OkanaganLakeBC's Shortened Version of the Water System Bylaws (User Fees and Maintenance Fees
(red underlining, and less clicking and waiting for those of us on dialup)

Water System Bylaws on RDCO's website

RDCO Water Systems Budget 2008-2012

RDCO Water Systems Budget 2009-2013

Agendas and Minutes of the Meetings for Water Systems

Two Shorts Creek Water Licenses

Petition proposal for a water system for Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun

Water System Grants (coming soon)

Newspaper articles (coming soon)

Links (coming soon)

We are going to try to organize the information on this webpage a bit better so stay tuned.  We have collected lots of information and this webpage is getting way too long!

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Engineering Fees & Charges Survey - BC individual localities, water and sewer connection, garbage, and permit fees. This link is excel .xml format

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Delphine Maja RDCO Engineering Tech told two Valley of the Sun residents that Valley of the Sun was required to have water back when it was developed, but that somehow it quote, "slipped through the cracks".  Her words.

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.pdf icon Consolidated North Westside Official Community Plan Revised Sept 2007 page 52

2. Review and require existing and future water systems to be capable of fire suppression;

5. Review and locate additional fire halls to provide or improve fre protection.

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.pdf icon British Columbia’s Water Systems

There are more than 3,300 water systems in BC. The 96 systems operating in large municipalities serve close to 90% of the population. The remaining 10% of the population is served by a variety of public and private systems:

• Small municipalities (57 systems);
• Regional district service areas (97 systems);
• Improvement districts (211 systems);
• Private water utilities (185 systems);
• Water users communities (118 systems);
• First Nation reserves (468 systems);
• Individual private wells and domestic licensees (est. 63,000);
• Others including Crown Corporations, industrial operations; BC Parks and private campgrounds, mobile home parks, restaurants and service stations (estimated 2,100 systems).

Approximately 2,000 systems have fewer than 15 connections.

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WATER WITCHER

It may only cost you $100.00 to find out if you have water, call 250-306-1661.  This water witcher can witch for water through snow and can sometimes tell approx. how deep you may have to drill if you have a clay type soil.  He also has an almost perfect success rate.  He has been witching for water for approx. 20 years and has a very good reputation.

With the new water system regulations set by Interior Health Jan 2009, Valley of the Sun and Upper Fintry may have a larger price tag for a water system than was originally anticipated by property owners.

New regulations in Kelowna are requiring changes to the water metering systems which is now going to be converted from a metered flat rate system to being charged for how much water you actually use.

If you have a vegetable garden, will you be paying residential or agricultural rate??  Gardens take approx. 5-6 times (give or take) much more water than a home would.

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WE ARE DOING SOME RESEARCH AND FINDING INFO REGARDING WATER SYSTEMS

There are photos of the ponds/lakes at Valley of the Sun, the vegetation and some reptiles that live in Valley of the Sun.

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Hot Water Odour
On occasion, and depending on your location, hot water may develop a strong odour.  This can be especially problematic in regions where the water contains some sulphur, which results in hot water having a "rotten egg" smell.  If this occurs, drain the system completely, flush thoroughly and refill.  If the problem persists, the anode rod may need to be changed from magnesium to one made of aluminum.  In certain cases chlorinating and flushing of the water heater may be required.  Contact your hot water tank dealer or water supplier.

Source: GSW Water Heating electric hot water tank owners manual

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Feb 24, 2009 we received this letter from the Regional District of Central Okanagan regarding too many information requests by email, so RDCO has now asked that information requests be sent by of snail mail or by way of the Freedom of Information Act.
Feb 24, 2009 we received this letter from the Regional District of Central Okanagan regarding too many information requests by email
click letter to read larger print.
RDCO basically says in this letter that it cannot answer so many questions by email as RDCO does not have the resources and that RDCO can't post the information asked for to their website which prompted the resident to ask so many questions in the first place, which prompted RDCO to send this letter above to the local resident.  Now there is no time to ask questions about the proposed water system petition which needs to be voted on by March 9, 2009.   Plus it will cost money for ink and envelopes and paper and stamps to send snail mail regarding the transfer station.  That's one way for RDCO to stifle the information getting out.

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Politicians target IHA demand
By Richard Rolke - Vernon Morning Star - Published: May 16, 2009

Demands for costly upgrades to Greater Vernon’s water system continue to flush out protests.

The Greater Vernon Advisory Committee has been ordered by the Interior Health Authority to have a filtration system on Duteau Creek by 2015.

We’d love to have the level of treatment they require but we don’t have the money,” said director Gyula Kiss.

IHA’s order comes ahead of GVAC’s original schedule of 2017 or 2018 for filtration. The price tag would be about $20 million.

For director Mike Macnabb, he would like to see a cost-benefit analysis done.

“Where’s the science to support that we should do all of this?” he said, adding that filtration may not actually get rid of water-borne illnesses.

“The level of treatment they are expecting us to provide and pay for may not prevent what you think is the problem.”


Roger Parsonage, assistant director of health protection, defends IHA’s actions.

“The issue of cost isn’t lost on us. We know they are big ticket items. But in terms of the science, the evidence is there,” he said.

Some GVAC directors question the presence of cryptosporidium locally, but Parsonage says there are indications that it is present.

“I hope you aren’t making decisions about what hasn’t happened instead of waiting for an outbreak to occur and then making a decision,” he said.

Despite Parsonage’s comments, Kiss says IHA does little to assist utilities with upgrades.

“The government gives out orders with no funding and we have no powers to protect our watersheds,” he said.

Parsonage says IHA does support jurisdictions when they seek senior government funding for improvements, but ultimately, the responsibility belongs to utilities.

“Source protection by itself will never be enough. Water suppliers have an obligation over the quality of water they provide,” he said.

The committee is currently constructing a new $29 million water treatment plant on Duteau Creek.

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Regional District of Central Okanagan
2008-2012 Five Year Program Budget Projections
Okanagan Basin Water Board
Okanagan Water Basin Budget Projection 2008 - 2012
click Budget Projection above to read all budget projections (123 pages) on RDCO's website
Tax Requisition from Central Okanagan West $53,170 for 2008
Tax Requisition from Central Okanagan West $54,498 for 2009
Tax Requisition from Central Okanagan West $55,580 for 2010
Tax Requisition from Central Okanagan West $56,684 for 2011
Tax Requisition from Central Okanagan West $57,809 for 2012
TOTAL OVER THE 5 YEARS = $277,741

 

On page 4
Water Board shall not exceed $0.036 per $1,000

http://www.obwb.ca/fileadmin/docs/supplementary_letters_patent.pdf

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting – March 23, 2009

Proposed Killiney Beach Water Upgrade
The Regional Board has approved submission of an application for funding from the Building Canada Fund – Communities Component for upgrades to the Killiney Beach water system. It’s anticipated the first phase of the upgrade would see capacity of the midlevel reservoir increase from 75,000-litres to 615,000- litres, flow metering and chlorine residual analyzers in
each of the systems four zones. It is anticipated that funding for the project would come from a combination of reserves and senior government grant programs.

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Westside water projects proceed
Vernon Morning Star - By Richard Rolke - Published: March 27, 2009

Initiatives are underway to enhance the availability of water in the North Westside Road area.

The Central Okanagan Regional District is proceeding with a bylaw that would create a new water distribution system in Upper Fintry, Shalal Road and Valley of the Sun, while government funds are being sought for upgrades to the Killiney Beach water utility.

“I’ve been out here for 38 years and water is the riding issue,” said Jim Edgson, director.

Three readings have been given to a bylaw that would create a service area for the water service at Upper Fintry, Shalal Road and Valley of the Sun.

Engineering staff will now apply to the provincial government for a grant to offset the estimated $400,000 cost of designing the system. And well site exploration and development will occur once a consulting engineer is hired.

Costs for the $6 million project will be covered through a parcel tax while individual property owners will be responsible for connecting their homes to the line.

Edgson, though, hopes to reduce the burden on taxpayers for the work, which will start in spring 2010.

“We can apply for every government grant we can get,” he said.

A majority of Valley of the Sun/Upper Fintry property owners have agreed to the project, and an information campaign was led by a committee of six people.

“They did the lion’s share of the work to make sure this goes ahead,” said Edgson.

In terms of the Killiney Beach water upgrade, CORD is applying to the federal and provincial governments for upgrades to the utility.

It’s anticipated that the first phase of the project will see capacity of the mid-level reservoir increase from 75,000 litres to 615,000 litres, flow metering and chlorine residual analyzers in each of the system’s four zones.

“Upper parts of the water system are 36 years old and the lower parts are older than that,” said Edgson.

The anticipated price tag for phase one is $450,000 and it will be covered by reserves and senior government grants.

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Water management poses challenges for municipalities
By Jennifer Smith - Kelowna Capital News - Published: March 12, 2009

Figuring out how to govern our water is going to be a major challenge for local governments, Mayor Sharon Shepherd says.

Monday morning her council took a two-hour workshop on water and the challenges facing the five water purveyors in this city.

About 55,000 people fall under City of Kelowna’s water system and the rest are divided among the other water districts.

The water districts all have varying levels of the infrastructure needed to meet increasingly stringent drinking water standards and, as a water purveyor cannot apply directly to the government for grant funding, those separate water districts need the city to upgrade their infrastructure by getting on the city’s infrastructure project list.

That isn’t as easy as it sounds, according to the mayor.

“It’s where do we put it in our list and might that then eliminate some other projects that we’re applying for,” said Shepherd, when asked about the problem Monday.

There is also the issue of governance and whether it really is wise to have five water purveyors looking after one city’s drinking water.

As it stands, the 55,000 residences in the city’s water system are at an advantage because they’re tied directly to a municipal government that can apply for grants on their behalf, whereas residents in the other areas—Glenmore, East Kelowna, Black Mountain and parts of Rutland—can’t claim that direct tie.

Council did not take any action during Monday’s meeting nor have they done so on a move from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities suggesting municipalities look to ban bottled drinking water.

When asked about the bottled water ban, Shepherd indicated it is actually counter-intuitive for any city which has concerns about water quality.

Several water districts are experiencing multiple boil water advisories per year and places like schools in those areas are already coping with how to provide clean, safe water during the day. “We’re also trying to encourage good nutrition and having bottled water for a student using recreation, to me, is a higher priority,” said Shepherd.

Shepherd said the bottom line at this point is that cities need to find ways to provide pure water for all of their residents and that open dialogue, like Monday’s, will help them sort out some of the governance issues involved.

In 2008 a report was commissioned to determine how best to meet the Interior Health Authorities requirements assessing whether the water districts are on the track and some of the technologies involved.

The consultants report will determine the backbone for the infrastructure projects needed when the city and water purveyors get to that stage.

jsmith [at] kelownacapnews.com

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IHA demands draw fire from regional board
By Richard Rolke - Vernon Morning Star - Published: March 06, 2009

The Interior Health Authority is accused of being heavy-handed over water quality regulations.

The North Okanagan Regional District has been ordered by IHA to have a filtration system on the Duteau Creek source by 2015, well ahead of schedule.

“The standards being set here aren’t the same as the standards across the province. We should have a standard for the entire province,” said Eric Foster, NORD chairman.

The original goal for Duteau Creek filtration was 2017 or 2018, and the price tag is about $20 million.

“Of course we all want safe drinking water, but we have to be able to pay for it. They’d break us,” said Foster, adding that IHA is quick to demand improvements but it doesn’t assist with the cost.

“Show us where it’s necessary and come to the table with a cheque.”

But while Duteau Creek is on the table now, IHA could demand filtration of other water utilities within the region, including Mabel Lake and Silver Star.

“The costs involved are beyond the reach of a lot of people,” said Rick Fairbairn, rural Lumby director.

Director John Trainor claims Armstrong has already experienced problems over rebuilding parts of its water system.

“It’s like talking to a brick wall,” he said of IHA.

“We will have to spend hundreds of millions of dollars in the province to filter everything.”

NORD staff have talked to IHA bureaucrats about the matter, but the plan is for directors to get a hold of their MLAs and IHA board members.

“We should bring this to their attention,” said Herman Halvorson, rural Enderby director, who is meeting with Health Minister George Abbott March 20.

Wayne Lippert, Vernon director, is calling on all jurisdictions to speak out.

“Either bring everyone in the province to compliance or we will comply and give us the money,” he said.

However, IHA officials defend their actions, saying there are provincial and national expectations for water quality.

“We want water provided from that (Duteau) source to meet treatment objectives,” said Roger Parsonage, assistant director of health protection.

In terms of NORD accusations that it’s being asked to follow rules other B.C. jurisdictions aren’t, Parsonage would not enter into the debate.

“I can’t comment on what other health authorities are or are not doing,” he said.

In terms of the finances needed to upgrade utilities and install filtration, Parsonage insists IHA provides letters of support when municipalities and regional districts apply to senior government for grants.

“The fact that there is a significant cost is not lost on us,” he said.

However, Parsonage contends that any improvements are necessary to ensure public health and that, not money, is the priority.

“We want suppliers to make plans to achieve the objectives whether they get grants or not,” he said

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OBWB deems watershed protection a priority
Vernon Morning Star - News - Published: February 05, 2009

A basin-wide, source water protection strategy should be a priority of the new Okanagan Basin Water Board, members have resolved.

Board members are concerned about protection of the watershed for domestic users when few of the activities in them can be controlled by water utilities.

Chairman Brian Given commented, “We want good, clear drinking water for all residents.”

Board member Toby Pike noted that Interior Health policy is that water utilities should filter domestic water which comes from surface sources unless a source water protection plan is in place.

That level of water treatment is very expensive.

Board member Tom Siddon said the Integrated Land Management Bureau is a big problem for the OBWB because of its mandate to sell the currently leased Crown-owned recreational lots on reservoirs in the Okanagan’s watershed; because of its interest in permitting ‘huge marinas’ on small lakes; and floating breakwaters; floating communities of houseboats; and condos on the lakeshore.

Because a new minister of lands was appointed to replace Stan Hagen, who died suddenly Jan. 20, the board voted to send a letter to new minister Ron Cantelon expressing its concerns about the proposal to sell the recreation lots.

Although Hagen had written to the board prior to his death, promising a two-year moratorium on the sales until hydrology studies could be completed, board members expressed concerns that the matter has not yet been resolved.

Lake Country’s James Baker commented, “It’s not just the question of whether we can raise the level of our dams, it’s development on those reservoirs. If sold, they could go from rustic cabins to big developments with septic systems along the shoreline.”

Siddon agreed that the new minister should be reminded of the board’s concerns and that, “We’re adamantly opposed to the sale of those lots.”

He questioned why 300,000 people’s right to clean water should be compromised by the desires of a few dozen cabin owners.

The board voted to send a letter to the minister, along with a package of background information; and to send a letter to the Southern Interior Local Government Association asking for support against the sale of the provincial leases lots located on upper elevation Okanagan drinking water reservoirs.

The upper level reservoirs are required to capture melting snow for use later in the summer when the valley dries up. Instead, the board would like to see the province retain ownership and control of the lands around reservoirs, a moratorium on further leases and gradual retirement of existing leases.

Then, a land act reserve should be placed on those lands, restricting their use to protect water supplies, read a letter for SILGA members.

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Do you see the problem here in these two documents below?
(*hint - read the green parts)

Regional District of Central Okanagan
2008-2012 Five Year Program Budget Projections
Westshore Estates Water System
2010 20 year loan
Regional District of Central Okanagan budget projection Westshore Estates Water System 2008 - 2012
click Budget Projection above to read all budget projections (123 pages) on RDCO's website

2008-2012 Five Year Program Budget Projections
Westshore Estates Water System says this project would need to be financed for more than 5 years, and would therefore require public approval.  It is shown here as a parcel tax option over 20 years.  Engineering staff are looking at other rate alternatives, etc.
2010 Parcel Tax $19,605
Capital Financing $209,500

To meet the recommended improvements, your water utility maintenance fee of $27.50/quarter will be increased to $32.50/quarter, effective January 1, 2003.  Currently utility user fee of $50/quarter remains the same for 2003.
Since 2003 residents of Westshore Estates have been paying for water system upgrades.  To meet the recommended improvements, your water utility maintenance fee of $27.50/quarter will be increased to $32.50/quarter, effective January 1, 2003.
click image to read larger print

Since 2003 residents of Westshore Estates have had an increase in the water utility rate to pay for water system upgrades and now are they going to pay again for these upgrades?
Maybe RDCO forgot?

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Lane means narrow highway in regards to utility corridors
Lane means a narrow highway in regards to RDCO utility corridors.

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Regional District of Central Okanagan
2008-2012 Five Year Program Budget Projections
Killiney Beach Water System
20 year financing for this water system

Regional District of Central Okanagan - 2008-2012 Five Year Program Budget Projections - Killiney Beach Water System
a. Would need to get electoral approval for 20 year financing.  Rates would need to increase to cover financing costs.

b. Costs may be higher pending cost review.

c. Pump replacement in 2011 will require short term financing (5 years 6%) and rate increase.

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Fire consumes Spall home

Firefighters tackle a raging house fire in the 5100 block of Salmon River Road Saturday.

Vernon Morning Star - By Richard Rolke - Published: March 31, 2009

Fire has razed a Spallumcheen home.

The occupant of a residence in the 5100 block of Salmon River Road was forced to flee at about 1 p.m. Saturday after he noticed flames and smoke.

“He got out with a little bit of singeing,” said Alistair Crick, Armstrong-Spallumcheen deputy fire chief.

By the time crews arrived, the fire was established fully in the roof, making suppression challenging.

Also creating some difficulties was the lack of hydrants in the area so the fire departments from Ranchero and Enderby helped truck water to the scene.

“We had dead spots for about 10 minutes with no water so consequently we lost the building,” said Crick.

In the spring and summer, irrigation lines from adjacent farms can provide access to water but they are shut down in the winter.

Firefighters also had some problems getting on to the property.

“It’s up on a hillside so there was road access with a slippery driveway,” said Crick.

At this point, a cause for the fire is still being determined.

“It’s looking like it could be electrical but we will have to do more investigation,” said Crick.

The property owner did not have insurance.

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Many unresolved issues surround water rights

Okanagan Lake is the largest water body in the Okanagan Basin, which straddles the Canada/U.S. border, creating the need for international agreements on water.

Kelowna Capital News - By Judie Steeves - Published: March 28, 2009

The Okanagan basin doesn’t end at the 49th parallel, but only the Okanagan Nation Alliance treats it all as one basin.

Gwen Bridge, natural resource manager for the ONA, speaking as part of a panel arranged by the Okanagan Basin Water Board and UBCO as part of World Water Week activities, said Thursday the seven member bands include the Colville Confederated Tribes, which are in the U.S., but she said, “Our map doesn’t stop at the border.”

She noted there are many unresolved issues with First Nations water rights in Canada, but she said they believe in “first in time, first in right,” which means First Nations have the top priority for water.

In the U.S., she said reserves have the first rights to all water which flows through the reserve.

However, they also take responsibility for ensuring there is water for fish and that the watershed’s integrity is not compromised.

“The fish have the water rights and we protect them,” she explained.

Here in Canada, she said there’s no understanding of what First Nations’ water rights might be. From upland reserves right to Okanagan Lake, is all Okanagan Nation water, she said.

From time immemorial First Nations have managed it and yet now they are not even being consulted about it.

“We need to go to the elders and reconcile our decisions with traditional knowledge,” she said.

“It’s all about collaboration,” she added later.

UBCO anthropologist John Wagner, who has been researching water in the Okanagan for the past several years, said in the U.S., they just assume they will get our water when they run out.

At first during his research, he said he was concerned that there are more than 300 agencies which have something to do with managing water in the Okanagan.

He felt there should be watershed-wide governance. However, he said he’s changed his mind, after watching the work of the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council, which is made up of representatives from the many sectors with an interest in water issues.

The council completed a comprehensive Okanagan Sustainable Water Strategy action plan for the basin last fall, and Wagner says that made him realize if that many interest groups can work together to produce such a document, it’s not quite as fragmented as he thought initially.

“In many way, we’re learning to speak with one voice,” he commented, using as an example the unanimous opinion of the valley’s local government bodies and water purveyors opposing the sale of leased recreational lots on reservoirs in the hills around the valley.

The problem, he said, is there isn’t the same unanimity at the provincial level, where water is part of the legislation of a number of ministries.

Wagner said the province should also not be making unilateral decisions about erasing irrigation districts, which existing provincial policies suggest should happen.

“The council shows that a lot of institutions can work together well. They have to have a culture of understanding,” he said.

Glen Davidson, of the environment ministry, who is also deputy comptroller of water rights and sits on the International Joint Commission board of control for the Okanagan basin, agreed. As a water engineer who used to work for Land and Water B.C., Davidson said that it made no sense to develop around reservoirs. He said this year is the 100th anniversary of the B.C. Water Act, which governs licenses and orders, some of which are very old.

He noted that society’s interests have changed, and there’s been an increase in demand for licenses, but there’s also been an increase in concerns about flows for fish.

“We will need to find those flows, and we will also need to find water for First Nations,” he said.

jsteeves [at] kelownacapnews.com

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OBWB deems watershed protection a priority
Vernon Morning Star - Published: February 05, 2009

A basin-wide, source water protection strategy should be a priority of the new Okanagan Basin Water Board, members have resolved.

Board members are concerned about protection of the watershed for domestic users when few of the activities in them can be controlled by water utilities.

Chairman Brian Given commented, “We want good, clear drinking water for all residents.”

Board member Toby Pike noted that Interior Health policy is that water utilities should filter domestic water which comes from surface sources unless a source water protection plan is in place.

That level of water treatment is very expensive.

Board member Tom Siddon said the Integrated Land Management Bureau is a big problem for the OBWB because of its mandate to sell the currently leased Crown-owned recreational lots on reservoirs in the Okanagan’s watershed; because of its interest in permitting ‘huge marinas’ on small lakes; and floating breakwaters; floating communities of houseboats; and condos on the lakeshore.

Because a new minister of lands was appointed to replace Stan Hagen, who died suddenly Jan. 20, the board voted to send a letter to new minister Ron Cantelon expressing its concerns about the proposal to sell the recreation lots.

Although Hagen had written to the board prior to his death, promising a two-year moratorium on the sales until hydrology studies could be completed, board members expressed concerns that the matter has not yet been resolved.

Lake Country’s James Baker commented, “It’s not just the question of whether we can raise the level of our dams, it’s development on those reservoirs. If sold, they could go from rustic cabins to big developments with septic systems along the shoreline.”

Siddon agreed that the new minister should be reminded of the board’s concerns and that, “We’re adamantly opposed to the sale of those lots.”

He questioned why 300,000 people’s right to clean water should be compromised by the desires of a few dozen cabin owners.

The board voted to send a letter to the minister, along with a package of background information; and to send a letter to the Southern Interior Local Government Association asking for support against the sale of the provincial leases lots located on upper elevation Okanagan drinking water reservoirs.

The upper level reservoirs are required to capture melting snow for use later in the summer when the valley dries up. Instead, the board would like to see the province retain ownership and control of the lands around reservoirs, a moratorium on further leases and gradual retirement of existing leases.

Then, a land act reserve should be placed on those lands, restricting their use to protect water supplies, read a letter for SILGA members.

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City feared being sued after 2003 fire, new report says
By Cheryl Wierda - Kelowna Capital News - Published: February 03, 2009

The threat of legal action against the city “ate” into the two-year window of opportunity to undertake actions to mitigate the impact of future wildfires following the Okanagan Mountain Park Fire in 2003, a new report indicates.

However, the report’s author also found that the city did still manage to work towards mitigating post-wildfire risks, noting for example, that city council support for dealing with the post-fire flood risk was actually very high.

In a new study called The Resilience of the City of Kelowna: Exploring mitigation before, during and after the Okanagan Mountain Park Fire, author Dan Sandink evaluated the measures taken by the City of Kelowna to mitigate the impacts of the 2003 fire and to prevent a repeat of such an event in the future.

In the report, he looks at, among other things, the impact of the fire on various city departments, the lessons learned from interface fires in other communities, the evacuation, government relief, the post-disaster window of opportunity and barriers and obstacles to the implementation of mitigation strategies.

In interviews with city staff, they indicated that the post-disaster window of opportunity, where the public and political interest in implementing wildfire mitigation measures is high, is two years.

However, a barrier to implementing new mitigative programs at the local level was the threat of litigation against the city by some insurance companies.

The threat created a culture of “conservative communications” within the city, staff told the report’s author.

“The threat of litigation and the resulting conservative attitude toward analysis and communication of the events of the OMPF existed for approximately two years after the OMPF,” wrote Sandink, manager of resilient cities and research at the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction.

“Interviewees indicated that this threat effectively ‘ate up’ the two year window of opportunity for the implementation of various mitigation strategies following the fire.”

However, Sandink added, municipal staff said the threat of litigation did not hinder the city’s efforts for mitigating post-wildfire risks.

Not long after the fire happened, the city spent approximately $2 million to deal with flood threats created by the fire—without the help of other levels of government, which was indicated as another challenge following the fire.

In the report, interview subjects suggested that the provincial and federal government should move toward more proactive disaster management assistance, rather than strictly focusing on preparedness, response and recovery.

For example, the author noted that a consultant determined that the use of building codes and standards was found to be an important factor in reducing fire risk in Kelowna.

Municipal staff, Sandink wrote, felt the province should work closer with the city to ensure that fire resistant building practices—which fall under the purview of the province—are enforced in wildland-urban interface areas.

Also highlighted in the report were Kelowna’s education efforts surrounding reducing fuel loads on properties in wildland areas that began as early as the 1990s.

Public interest increased significantly in the time following when the fire occurred, but has since dropped, the report indicates.

“Staff feared that over the long term, public and political interest in fuel management practices generally…and private property owner fuel management and FireSmart behaviour would wane, thus leading to an increased risk of fire,” wrote Sandink.

However, municipal staff generally believed that if Kelowna experienced a similar wildfire event in the next decade, the impact of the fire would be somewhat less severe.

“Respondents believed that their experience with the OMPF has increased their ability to quickly and effectively recover from all types of future hazards. Many of the processes that were established during the OMPF emergency situation…would lead to expedited recovery from future natural and non-natural hazard events.”

Sandink concluded the city was able to adapt to the barriers and obstacles it faced in their attempts to control wildland-urban interface fire hazards and said the city has employed many actions to manage wildfire risk—both before and after the 2003 fire.

cwierda "at" kelownacapnews.com

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Good, clear drinking water prioritized by board
By Judie Steeves - Kelowna Capital News - News - Published: February 03, 2009

A basin-wide, source water protection strategy should be a priority of the new Okanagan Basin Water Board, members resolved Tuesday, at the first meeting since last fall’s civic election.

Board members expressed concerns about protection of the watershed for domestic users when few of the activities in them can be controlled by water utilities.

Chairman Brian Given commented, “We want good, clear drinking water for all residents.”

Board member Toby Pike noted that Interior Health policy is that water utilities should filter domestic water which comes from surface sources unless a source water protection plan is in place.

That level of water treatment is very expensive.

Board member Tom Siddon said the Integrated Land Management Bureau is a big problem for the OBWB because of its mandate to sell the currently-leased Crown-owned recreational lots on reservoirs in the Okanagan’s watershed; because of its interest in permitting ‘huge marinas’ on small lakes; and floating breakwaters; floating communities of houseboats; and condos on the lakeshore.

Because a new minister of lands was appointed last week to replace Stan Hagen, who died suddenly Jan. 20, the board voted to send a letter to new minister Ron Cantelon expressing its concerns about the proposal to sell the recreation lots.

Although Hagen had written to the board prior to his death, promising a two-year moratorium on the sales until hydrology studies could be completed, board members expressed concerns that the matter has not yet been resolved.

Lake Country James Baker commented, “It’s not just the question of whether we can raise the level of our dams, it’s development on those reservoirs. If sold, they could go from rustic cabins to big developments with septic systems along the shoreline.”

Board member Tom Siddon agreed that the new minister should be reminded of the board’s concerns and that, “We’re adamantly opposed to the sale of those lots.”

He questioned why 300,000 people’s right to clean water should be compromised by the desires of a few dozen cabin owners.

The board voted to send a letter to the minister, along with a package of background information; and to send a letter to the Southern Interior Local Government Association asking for support against the sale of the provincial leases lots located on upper elevation Okanagan drinking water reservoirs.

The upper level reservoirs are required to capture melting snow for use later in the summer when the valley dries up. Instead, the board would like to see the province retain ownership and control of the lands around reservoirs, a moratorium on further leases and gradual retirement of existing leases.

Then, a land act reserve should be placed on those lands, restricting their use to protect water supplies, read a letter for SILGA members.

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Water use goes under the microscope
By Jason Luciw - Kelowna Capital News - Published: January 10, 2009

New bills going out mid-month will tell all about Westbank’s water use.

Westbank Irrigation District manager Brian Jamieson said the revamped statements, which normally would have gone out in November, were held back so residents got a glimpse of their consumption in the last quarter of 2008.

And on every quarterly bill from here on out, Westbank residents will be shown how much water they used, with the hope they cut down on consumption before the next bill goes out.

Those that don’t use water wisely will find themselves paying extra for it, starting in April of next year, said Jamieson. The utility will take consumption levels and work with a consultant this year to establish a new metered rate.

“We’ve been reading metres monthly for the last year, so we have a year’s record of the customers’ monthly readings already,” said Jamieson.

“Before the end of 2009 we certainly will have a rate and we’ll communicate that rate and we will implement that rate for the first quarter of 2010.”

Readings will be used to establish an average. Customers who use more than the average will pay more. Those who consume less will pay less.

“We’re going to be providing them tips on how to conserve water indoors during the winter and outdoors during the summer so they have a chance to adjust.”

Currently , Westbank customers pay a flat rate of $93.75 per quarter per single family home, plus a $55 annual tax to cover capital and operating costs over and above water processing expenses.

The Westbank Irrigation District asked its customers to install meters more than a year ago for three reasons.

One was so the usage-based rate could eventually be established.

“A lot of people have reduced their water consumption just because they know there’s a meter in the house even though we’re not actually charging them on a consumption base right now.”

The next was to further promote water conservation.

“And actually for the past three or four years our demand has either remained static, even though the community has grown, or actually gone down in the summer (through) sprinkling regulations and putting in the meters,” Jamieson said.

And the final reason was to give the utility more lead time to save for future infrastructure costs, said Jamieson. Future capital projects include increasing the treatment capacity of the Powers Creek water plant and a $6.5 million expansion of the Lambly (Bear) Lake reservoir.

The Westbank Irrigation District has 5,000 customers serving more than 11,000 residents.

Lakeview Irrigation District did not install water meters at the same time, but has announced it will start installations throughout its area starting next month.

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Governance and Services Committee Agenda Jan 15, 2009

Item 4.2 Regional Drinking Water Team.pdf

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To okanaganlakebc.ca:

Thank you for your email of December 5, 2008, regarding eligibility under the Towns for Tomorrow Program (Program).

The Program provides funding for capital projects in small communities with populations up to 15,000. Only local governments are eligible to apply for funding under the Program. Additionally, infrastructure must be owned and operated by a local government to be eligible for funding.

As grant programs are oversubscribed, grant applications must be evaluated and prioritized to determine which projects best meet the Program goals and objectives. Projects that resolve health and environmental problems rank the highest while those for increased capacity for new and existing development rank the lowest. Generally, only those projects that are evaluated as a high priority are recommended for funding approval.

I would encourage the Regional District of Central Okanagan staff to contact the Local Government Infrastructure and Finance Division by telephone at: 250 387-4060 for further enquiries about project eligibility.

Thank you, again, for writing.

Sincerely,
Blair Lekstrom
Minister of Community Development

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Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Minutes Nov 24, 2008
It was noted that recovery of the feasibility funds occurs only if sewer water is developed in the area. (page 8)

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– November 24, 2008

North Westside Community Water Study
The Regional Board has directed staff to create a plan and schedule in order to continue the project looking at options and costs of providing a community water system for the upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun subdivisions in the North Westside Road area.
The Regional District will continue the consultation process with area residents to determine the preferred options and level of support while investigating possible sources that could be used to provide water service to the more than 340 properties that do not have a community water system.

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This is an inside look at how abuse and fraud take place to unsuspecting people that hire unscrupulous drillers. We are the company that gets called when our competitor's wells seal up and don't produce water anymore.

one GPM is 1400 gallons per day, and is plenty of water for a single residence

If the water in the fissures to your well comes from a large pond or a mountain lake, then you may have a more insulated water source.

The thing that you don't want to do is allow a driller to do the witching for you.

ELECTRO-SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY
Another emerging industry that is quickly becoming a source of underground information are new companies that use technology to perform aquifer testing. This is a method borrowed from the oil companies that have been very successful in the location of oil sources deep in the ground. They have sensitive recording devices attached to imbedded poles that are driven into the ground. They hit the ground and then analyze the readings with the aid of computer software that they have developed.

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Second look at Peachland water plan nets no change
Kelowna Capital News - News - Published: January 17, 2009

Try as they might, the newly elected council members couldn’t pop any holes in Peachland’s Water Master Plan this week, even though the somewhat controversial, and certainly expensive, plan came under fire during last year’s election run-up for being excessive and overpriced.

The plan was called a “Cadillac” during the election season and Mayor Keith Fielding made it an issue by promising he would re-examine the plan to find better, less expensive options.

Council did re-examine the plan Tuesday but no better or less expensive options were found during the three-hour meeting, which featured representatives from engineering firm Urban Systems explaining how the already approved plan came to be.

The bottom line is that Canadian drinking water guidelines and directions from Interior Health will require the District of Peachland to filter its drinking water in the future and treated water must be delivered to everyone in town.

The plan is a 20-year comprehensive project that was approved by the previous council.

With a total price tag of $55.4 million, the plan has not been short of critics since it was adopted.

Key components of the plan, according to senior planner Dan Huang include:

• Establishing Peachland Creek as the primary water source for the town;

• Planning on future treatment, including filtration, based on the Peachland Creek source;

• Integrate the town’s water systems to maximize treatment and distribution system efficiency;

• Add additional reservoir capacity to provide peaking storage;

• Achieve further water conservation objectives through operational, educational, regulatory and economic and financial measures;

• Provide a phased approach to ensure the financial viability of the plan.

“The primary issue facing the district is the long-term need for water treatment to meet provincial and Interior Health Authority standards,” said Greg Buchholz, water quality specialist with Urban Systems.

“The Water Master Plan has structured capital improvements such that development should benefit the community as a whole and that new development pays its fair share,” said Buchholz.

Only the town’s Peachland Creek water system is capable of supplying future water needs and the plan calls for that system to deliver water all over Peachland.

Buchholz also said Peachland Lake is of such a size that it could serve as a reservoir for a municipality of 35,000 people.

There are three major components to the plan, according to Buchholz: A treatment plant, a distribution network that involves upsizing of existing piping, and treated water storage.

Financially, people are fixated on the $55.4 million overall number but there are some other numbers to keep in mind, according to Huang.

Developers are required to contribute to the plan through both development cost charges and on a pay-as-you-go system.

The plan also relies on grant opportunities through senior levels of government.

“The district’s portion (the remainder after grants and developer’s contributions) of the Water Master Plan is estimated at $18 million,” said Huang.

Put into perspective, Peachland residents will ultimately pay for sustainable, clean water operations, approximately $1 per cubic metre in the future.

Huang pointed out that one cubic metre is equal to 1,000 litres of water, and all for the price of a Loonie.

Coun. Lindsay Bell said she has been asked by residents what the tax implications are of the master plan. Huang pointed out the water system is a self-funded utility that is paid for by user fees and a parcel tax.

Mayor Keith Fielding asked if ultraviolet light treatment could be done to Peachland’s drinking water as an alternative to filtration.

Due to Peachland’s upland source of water and its turbidity problems, the town would not be able to rely on UV protection only, said Rob Birtles, drinking water officer with IHA.

“If we wanted to save money, $18 million is a lot of money and many people are concerned about it,” said Fielding. “Do we have any options?”

Huang explained that building a treatment plant may be deferred for a bit but it will still have to be built. Upgrades to the distribution system, including a ‘spine’ or major water main across the mountain, still needs to be installed, although reservoir storage could possibly be cut down.

“You’re talking about shaving pennies off the top,” said Huang.

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Time to put management strategy plan into action
By Judie Steeves - Kelowna Capital News - Published: January 17, 2009

With completion of a sustainable water strategy for the Okanagan Valley, members of the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council are now turning their attention to implementing the 45 action items in it.

After three years of effort creating the document, the next step will be to ensure it isn’t just put on a shelf.

At its regular meeting Thursday, OWSC chairman Tom Siddon said as well, the council needs to “back the new Okanagan Basin Water Board members on the issues and provide political support to them.”

The OWSC makes recommendations to the OBWB, and following last fall’s civic elections, the OBWB has an almost-entirely new board.

It’s made up of three directors from each of the three regional districts in the valley.

The newly-appointed directors are: Stu Wells, Gordon Clark and Michael Bryden from the south; Doug Findlater, Brian Given and James Baker from the Central Okanagan and Buffy Baumbrough, Rick Fairbairn and Gyula Kiss from the North Okanagan.

Toby Pike will sit on the board as chairman of the Water Supply Association of B.C., but it hasn’t been confirmed whether Chief Fabian Alexis of the Okanagan Indian Band will return to represent First Nations.

Of the elected members, only Baumbrough and Fairbairn are returning board members, as is appointed member Toby Pike.

A draft work plan for the coming year was discussed by stewardship council members, with general agreement that it’s vital the council immediately push for action on the recommendations of the detailed strategy.

To provide updates and clarity on some of the action items, the council will invite speakers to come to meetings, as suggested by staff member Nelson Jatel, but first the council will set priorities amongst the 45 action items.

Those items include protecting riparian areas and wetlands, implementing a well protection toolkit, implementing stormwater management plans, collecting better information on evaporation and developing a groundwater regulation pilot program.

Council members include representatives from a broad range of community groups, from water suppliers to academics and non-government groups.

jsteeves [at] kelownacapnews.com

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Flushing out a new policy
By Jennifer Smith - Kelowna Capital News - Published: January 13, 2009

Kelowna Coun. Andr Blanleil is pooh poohing low flush toilets.

The devices don’t save water if you have to flush twice, he told water consultant Neil Klassen and city water department representative Don Degen Monday afternoon as the two presented a report on conservation measures heading down the pipe.

The City of Kelowna is looking to go beyond the low-flush technology currently in its bylaws and become the first jurisdiction in Canada to legislate that all new construction must use dual flush, low-flow toilets.

As for Blanleil’s reservations, Klassen said it all comes down to the quality of product used.

“You can buy good car stereos and you can buy poor car stereos…you can buy good quality toilets, you can buy poor quality toilets,” Klassen told council.

According to Klassen’s report, the technology has improved so much since Kelowna first implemented its low flush guidelines in 1994, the city now desperately needs to review its legislation.

The province has only just implemented the same requirements Kelowna’s been using for the past 15 years, but given this city’s unique desert climate, any maneuver that will improve our conservation is worth considering, the pair suggest.

In an interview after the presentation, Degen confirmed the city is among the highest per capita water consumers in the world, despite having reduced household consumption by 20 per cent since water metering was introduced 12 years ago.

“In many cases, Kelowna’s per capita, per person, water consumption can be as much as two to three times what the average national water consumption would be,” said Degen.

Canada is one of the highest water users on the planet and Degen’s figures estimate the average household here in the Okanagan is using 45,000 litres of water per month.

Most of that water is used during the summer months outside the home to irrigate lawns and gardens.

As such the city will soon be looking at tight landscaping and irrigation bylaws that will list everything from the types of plantings new construction can include to standards for the irrigation system itself.

The city’s water system only loses seven per cent, about half the national average, through the system infrastructure itself, so the changes that need to be made must be made both in attitude adjustments and the way we use the water we receive.

That doesn’t have to mean forgoing all lawns, Degen said.

“The landscape and irrigation standards will still allow the community to look the way we want it to look,” said Degen.

Using drought tolerant grasses, compost tea, and xeriscaping should help reduce water demand, he pointed out, saying research conducted last year suggests there are plenty of water consumers doing their part.

The city has been looking at bareland stratas, or the gated communities with standalone houses, to see whether they’re being charged an appropriate amount for water.

While their research found some of these stratas are using up to 17 times the amount of water the individual homeowner on a traditional fee simple lot uses, others are run as tight as a ship, and that the stratas understand where ever weak link in the system lies.

The city will be coming forward with new guidelines for the stratas.

Degen said city hall is also conducting an audit of 45 community parks to assess how much water flows into them each year.

Since metering was introduced 12 years ago, individual homeowner consumption has dropped by 20 per cent.

jsmith [at] kelownacapnews.com

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Why Meters?

The Regional District of Central Okanagan is moving from a flat rate system of billing for water to a rate based on actual consumption, similar to Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton. A meter is necessary to measure your water consumption. Water rates based on actual consumption create equitable billing and encourage water conservation.

http://www.westsidewatermeter.ca/ (website no longer works)

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Do I have to pay for the meter?
There is no charge for the meter or the installation. All costs are covered by the Regional District of Central Okanagan. The meter installer is a sub-contractor and is not allowed to perform any work other than installing the meter.

Who is responsible for maintaining the meter?
The Regional District of Central Okanagan is responsible for future meter maintenance. You are responsible for keeping the meter from damage.

How long does it take to install the meter?
A typical installation takes about 1 hour to complete, barring any necessary modifications.

Does the meter have to go inside the house?
The meter must be installed in the house, on your incoming water service. Any exceptions must be approved by the Regional District of Central Okanagan. See page three for details. The transmitting unit is attached to the meter. The Regional District of Central Okanagan will read your meter by radio frequency, so no one will need to enter your home or property after the installation.

 

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Last water meters to be installed on the Westside
By Jason Luciw - Kelowna Capital News - Published: January 10, 2009

Approximately 4,200 water meters will start going in next month at homes served by the Lakeview Irrigation District.

Lakeview is the last of the Westside’s seven water purveyors (Peachland, Westbank, Westbank First Nation, West Kelowna, Sunnyside and Pritchard are the other six) to have metres installed.

Lakeview manager James Moller explained why his irrigation district held out.

“We had other capital projects we had prioritized.  (Those were) the Dunwaters (Creek) diversion and other system upgrades, some of which we’ll be continuing over the next year,” he said.

Lakeview has also worked on connections with the Westbank Irrigation District and West Kelowna’s water system.

Lakeview Irrigation District’s board of directors has agreed to spend approximately $1.5 million from the irrigation district’s reserves to install water meters at customers’ homes.

(Multifamily complexes, such as apartments and condominiums, will generally have a single meter servicing the entire complex.)

Information gathered from the devices will eventually be used to establish usage-based rates.

Residents refusing to install meters will face a double whammy.

They’ll be charged significantly higher flat rates than customers with meters and in the end, will have to pay for the installation costs themselves when finally opting to comply.


It’s unlikely anyone will opt out. In the Westbank Irrigation District no one did when meters were installed there a year ago.

Representatives of the Westbank Irrigation District said a utility could install a “pit” meter and charge the resident for the costlier installation method.

While no one one refused a meter during Westbank installation, approximately 50 installations there were not completed for various reasons and must still be done.

Lakeview Irrigation District expects few if any of its customers will refuse installations, stating water conservation is in everyone’s best interest.

“Water meters are a proven method of reducing water consumption, and are a key element in Lakeview Irrigation District’s drought management plan,” the utility said in a public service announcement released this week.

The Cities of Kelowna, Penticton and Vernon are already metered, and as the District of West Kelowna continues to grow, the meters will give Lakeview the ability to manage its water resources more effectively.

Neptune Technology Group will install the meters.

Customers will receive an information booklet when installers begin working in their neighbourhoods. Once the booklet is received, customers are asked to phone or go online to schedule an installation appointment.

Day or evening bookings will be available. Lakeview asks that customers book an appointment within two weeks of receiving the booklet.

Someone 18 or older must be at home at the time of the installation, which takes approximately 45 minutes.

There will be no charge for the installation, provided it is done within the installation period.

Meters will be installed where the incoming water service enters the home—most likely in the basement or crawl space. However, in some instances, a pit meter must be installed at the property line.

Pit meters are generally required in older homes in cases where irrigation lines cross the property. Pit meter installations are costlier. Therefore, the irrigation district will do a physical audit, to determine how many homes will require them.

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Water woes ’thrust‘ on Oliver
Kelowna Dailey Courier - by Joe Fries - 2009-01-11

Water from two of the wells that supply Oliver contains a concentration of uranium that exceeds new health standards, and town councillors will decide Monday if they should ask the provincial government for help.

Council will deliberate on a grant application to upgrade the domestic water system, which the town operates, and compensate for the wells that were shut down in November.

“It‘s something that‘s been thrust on us by this change in the (uranium) threshold levels, and we now have to deal with it,” said Mayor Pat Hampson.

In May 2008, a committee of Health Canada revised the guidelines for drinking water quality, and lowered the safe threshold for uranium content from 0.1 to 0.02 milligrams per litre.

According to an Interior Health fact sheet, exposure to levels of uranium in drinking water higher than the new standard presents a risk of kidney damage, because of the metallic nature of the element, not radioactivity.

Uranium is a naturally occurring substance in the bedrock in some parts of the Okanagan, and a similar water problem has also cropped up in the Faulder area near Summerland. Some residents there were unhappy they would have to foot a large bill to comply with what they felt was a rather arbitrary decision on the part of the Health Canada committee.

Two of Oliver‘s four wells, Lion‘s and CPR, located in the downtown area, were taken out of service when tests revealed the now-unsafe level of uranium. Two other wells, Rockcliffe, to the south, and one at Tuc-El-Nuit Lake, have been confirmed as safe and are able to handle the town‘s water needs for the time being.

However, with the arrival of irrigation season in the spring, the two wells alone won‘t be able to meet demand.

It‘s hoped a grant through the province‘s Towns for Tomorrow program will cover 80 per cent of the $493,000 cost of re-establishing an existing, but unused, well at Tuc-El-Nuit, and upgrading the Miller Road well and installing a booster station there to make use of surplus capacity.

In the meantime, town staff has recommended that two other grant applications, funding for the Frank Venables auditorium renovation and the East Riverside Walkway, be deferred until further design work is completed.

The applications have been turned down once before, and Hampson said for the time being, “The water is obviously the highest priority.”

A decision on the grant application for the water upgrade is expected by March 16. If the application is rejected, the town will likely have to bear the full cost of the required work.

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City to address water issues
By Jennifer Smith - Kelowna Capital News - Published: January 10, 2009

It will be water, water everywhere come Monday as Kelowna councillors try to drink in the myriad of conservation measures coming down the pipe for the city.

A report before council next week looks at efforts made so far to develop a Water Sustainability Action Plan, including suggestions Kelowna could be the first city in Canada to legislate dual flush high efficiency toilets for use in new construction.

“This plan outlines a number of initiatives that are designed to reduce overall water consumption within the Kelowna water utility by a further 15 per cent by 2012,” a statement at the outset of the report explains.

The measures include everything from public education to new development standards, sealing leaks within the water system and charging for the water used.

According to the report, the city has spent the past three years working on improving its water rates to ensure they’re recovering the full cost of water utilities.

And new water rates will soon be on the way for customers currently not paying their fair share.

City staff have already been before council on numerous occasions saying the city needs to start metering stratified housing complexes that are not billed for the amount of water they use. The report suggests those charges are on the way in short order.

The city will also be looking in-house for conservation measures. Now that the water utility has 10 years of water metering data it’s become clear the city’s parks department is among the big spenders. Some 20 per cent of total water production pours into city parks between May and September.

jsmith [at] kelownacapnews.com

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Better water quality comes with wave of bills
Kelowna Daily Courier - by Don Plant - 2009-01-10

This is one big gulp thousands of Okanagan homeowners will find hard to swallow.

Interior Health has set rigorous standards for drinking-water quality so people don‘t get sick. To comply with the new requirements, Valley water utilities must spend hundreds of millions of dollars to build treatment systems and install new distribution lines.

The goal is to reduce the number of boil-water notices and water-quality advisories that utilities issue every time the tap water gets cloudy. Residents have become fatigued by the warnings. Some ignore them while others call their provider in a panic.

In Vernon, authorities issue an average of three boil-water notices a year, each lasting up to three weeks, and numerous advisories.

“There are so many water-quality advisories going on out there, they don‘t really know whether they‘re important or not,” said Al Cotsworth, manager of water for Greater Vernon Water.

“There‘s confusion and concern among seniors. They hear these advisories and say, ’What‘s wrong with our water?‘ . . . I‘m sure the bottled-water industry and the home water-treatment industry have benefited greatly from this.”

Residents aren‘t the only ones shelling out cash after the water turbidity (muddiness) triggers a warning. The Central Okanagan school district has shut off the fountains at three schools and budgeted $35,000 this year to give students and staff bottled water instead.

South Kelowna Elementary has relied on bottled water for three years. Many students bring tap water from home in bottles filled with the same water the school forbids them to drink. If they don‘t clean the bottles, pathogens can develop and make the water worse.

“There‘s a potential that kids with bacteria-ridden bottles are filling them up and there‘s cross-contamination,” said principal James Minkus. “I don‘t see a solution.”

Kelowna and Vernon face the heftiest bills to renovate their water systems – $180 million and more than $100 million, respectively. The South East Kelowna Irrigation District, now considering $18 million worth of upgrades, estimates its 2,000 customers will have to pay nearly $1,000 more a year than the $348 in tolls and taxes they now remit.

The project calls for developing two new wells dedicated to domestic water, 85 kilometres of new pipeline and a pump system to push the water to a higher elevation so all residents, including orchardists, receive the same drinking water. Manager Toby Pike agrees the quality must improve, but wonders how he‘ll provide potable water to hundreds of customers living on large acreages.

“We argue there should be recognition from senior government that there‘s a burden and there should be compensation to help out rural, agricultural areas,” he said.

All five Kelowna water utilities face substantial costs to meet the regulatory demands.

In Vernon, the regional district has completed the first phase of the Mission Hill water-treatment plant for $7 million. It plans to build a new water plant and distribution system at Duteau Creek for another $45 million.

Other Okanagan communities are ahead of the game. Penticton built a water-treatment plant and pump station in 1996 for $20 million. The same infrastructure today, which supplies 9,000 connections, would cost $50 million.

“Prices have tripled since then,” said Brent Edge, the city‘s water-quality supervisor. “We‘re lucky we put it in when we did.”

Summerland completed its $20-million water-treatment plant a year ago to bring the district in line with IH regulations. The plant‘s capacity of 74 million litres a day is sufficient most of the year. Officials still issue water advisories in the summer, when agricultural irrigation pushes daily demand to 120 million litres.

The district plans to spend another $4 million on new piping to separate agricultural water from domestic users. For now, the 4,500 customers spend $285 a year on a parcel tax to pay for the infrastructure over 20 years.

Westbank Irrigation District opened its new Powers Creek water-treatment plant two years ago on a $19-million budget. The district‘s 5,300 customers paid for the system without a dollar in government grants.

“Our water is better than bottled water because of the (IH) regulations,” said manager Brian Jamieson. “We have full filtration.”

Many question Interior Health‘s concern about turbidity and the high cost of keeping the water clear. Reservoirs often get muddy during spring runoff. Just because the tap water‘s a little opaque doesn‘t mean it‘s unsafe to drink, said Pike.

“Where‘s the risk? We‘ve never had a water-borne disease. Turbidity is not a sound indicator of risk,” he said.

A technical committee of water experts agrees. Acting on complaints from water providers, Health Minister George Abbott struck the committee to examine turbidity‘s effect on water quality. The conclusion: by itself, turbidity fails to explain the occurrence of infectious diseases.

The province is now developing a framework that takes a broader look at what‘s in a glass of water, said Dr. Andrew Larder, senior medical health officer with IH. Before they issue a health warning, authorities would take into account whether bacteria are detected, for example, or a system‘s disinfection process is compromised.

“We‘ll have to take more into consideration than a turbidity number,” he said. “We‘re committed to using that framework.”

The framework, which will be provincewide, should come into effect before spring runoff. Larder can‘t predict whether it will influence how much utilities spend to improve their water systems or whether it reduces water-borne illnesses.

There‘s no way to measure how much gastrointestinal illness relates to a water supply, he said. However, communities that improved their water treatment have seen illness rates decline.

“It has to be a good thing,” Larder said. “Even if there are significant increases in water rates, the cost per litre is still much cheaper than bottled water.

“I‘d like every water system to provide treated and safe water tomorrow. Each (utility) has to work out how quickly. Taking 20 to 30 years to do it is clearly not acceptable.”

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Water project grants available
By Judie Steeves - Kelowna Capital News - Published: December 09, 2008

There’s up to $300,000 available in grants for innovative and collaborative projects in 2009 that promote water conservation and water quality improvements in the valley.

Proposals must have a stamp of approval from the local council or regional district board before being forwarded to the Okanagan Basin Water Board’s grant program, explains program administrator Genevieve Dunbar.

Eligible applicants include local governments, non-profit community groups and irrigation or improvement districts.

She says they hope to see proposals for projects which could serve as models for other groups in the valley, and projects which will affect policy, so it’s not just a one-off impact.

Collaboration with partners and achieving matching funding is a bonus for an applicant. Often the OBWB funds can be used to leverage larger amounts, with grants from other sources as well, she said.

The board would also like to see applications for projects related to the Okanagan Sustainable Water Strategy prepared by the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council and released to the public in October.

It’s available on the website at www.obwb.ca

Usually they receive applications for double the amount of money available, she noted, so the successful projects are generally pretty good.

Last year four source water protection initiatives were approved for the Glenmore-Ellison, South East Kelowna, Westbank and Lakeview Irrigation Districts.

The City of Kelowna used a grant to come up with landscape and irrigation standards to be used in a bylaw for new development.

As well, the Kelowna Joint Water Committee received funds for the third phase of groundwater protection planning.

This is the fourth year of the grant program, which has given out $1.1 million for 59 projects.

Dunbar said projects previously funded through the program have led to significant improvements in water conservation and water quality and have leveraged a substantial amount of external funding from senior governments and other donors.

The deadline for application is Feb. 13. That must include the resolution of support from the local government body.

For grant application forms and details, go to the website or call Dunbar at 250-469-6270.

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Fintry water study still on tap
By Richard Rolke - Vernon Morning Star - Published: November 28, 2008

A process that could ultimately bring water to some North Westside Road neighbourhoods is still moving ahead.

The Central Okanagan Regional District board has instructed staff to keep looking at the options and costs for providing a community water system for upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun.

“We’ve done the first part of a study and now we’re coming up with a timeline and schedule on where to go with the project so we can draw it to a conclusion,” said Jim Edgson, director.

Presently, 340 properties do not have access to a water system, with most trucking water in and storing it in cisterns.

If a community water system was implemented, the utility would have to meet all provincial health regulations.

“They would also have to meet fire flow standards so the system would not be just for drinking but for fire protection,” said Edgson.

Rough estimates indicate a community water system would cost between $15,000 and $20,000 per property.

“It will cost a lot of money but the alternative is the status quo which is costly,” said Edgson.

“One individual at Valley of the Sun is spending $200 a month on water to haul it in.”

As part of the planning, consultation with residents will continue and discussions will revolve around preferred options and the level of public support for the initiative.

An open house will be held at the Killiney Beach Community Hall Thursday from 5 to 8 p.m.

Edgson insists that no action will be taken on establishing a community water system until a majority of residents agree through a yet-to-be-determined approval process.

“This is not something the regional district says will be done. It must be approved by the people,” he said.

-----------------------------------------------

Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun have a few things to complain about Jim Edgson and these water system studies.

Who holds a meeting from 5 pm - 8 pm but Jim Edgson. Here is the "notice of meeting" letter residents received in their mailbox from Jim Edgson and Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO).
http://www.okanaganlakebc.ca/community/personal/westside_road/images/water/water_meet_nov_08.jpg

A few of us (including the North Westside Ratepayers Association) tried asking Jim Edgson to change the meeting time but he refused. Many people work in town, which either Vernon or Kelowna its a 45 minute drive back to Killiney Beach Hall! One person works till 7 pm at the restaurant on the reserve. Too bad the meeting didn't start at 7 pm. It would be nice if residents could discuss this water system together and not be split apart like Jim Edgson is doing things. Doesn't Jim want us residents to be able to discuss this together? The notice of meeting letter states that staff will be leaving at 6:30 pm which the meeting letter also said Jim will be answering residents questions from 6:30 pm - 8 pm. How much does Jim Edgson know about water systems, is he an engineer or a wanna be engineer? I have a good question for Jim Edgson ... How long does a UV disinfection bulb last? Engineering couldn't even answer that question and said that they don't have any systems that use UV disinfection. I think if RDCO knew what they were doing down there, they would surely be able to tell me what a UV disinfection bulb would cost and how long it lasts! If RDCO didn't know the answer they should have been able to find out and tell me? The answer I got was that they don't have the answer.

More than one person pays approx. $200 per month for water, as there is more than one property that hires Knights Water Hauling to haul their water at Valley of the Sun which I have heard its $170 per load for approx. 200 gallons. Water is heavy and you need a heavy duty truck to haul any significant amounts of water. I pay $220 per year to draw water from a local private water utility and haul my own water, but I can only haul approx. 120 US gallons per trip (approx. once per week) in my GMC Safari van or I might break my van. I live by myself but if there were more than one person living in my house that 200 gallons of water wouldn't last very long.

These water system studies were initiated in March 2007 and we still don't have water at Valley of the Sun, and its almost 2009 now. There have been no test drilling nearer to the subdivisions yet either. Its seems that RDCO and Jim Edgson want to look for water the farthest away first! A transmission main from La Casa will cost over 1 million dollars according to the La Casa study.

Here is a link to the Central Okanagan Regional Districts website regarding these water studies for Upper Fintry (194 lots) , Valley of the Sun (146 lots), and Shalal Road subdivision of approx. 12 lots
http://www.regionaldistrict.com/departments/engineering/engineering_studies_casalomalakeviewsewer.aspx#NWwater

The Okanagan Lake and La Casa studies both include a new development (Mr. Kubas) of whom may apply for development for between 50 - 130 lots in front of Valley of the Sun. Mr Kubas has a water licence on Okanagan Lake and a right-of-way for piping Okanagan lake water up the hill and across Westside Road for himself. Mr Kubas has a watermain pipe already bored under Westside Road last winter.
http://www.okanaganlakebc.ca/community/ofinterest/westside_road/vos_augering.htm
Mr. Kubas is waiting to hear what residents decide, because they might want to join with Mr Kubas for Okanagan Lake water. Who knows if Mr Kubas would have applied for development by now if residents could have had the option to decide on what the best water system for them would be by now.

Upper Fintry had a water study done first Feb 27, 2007 to draw water from an existing private utility at Fintry Delta. The Fintry Delta private water utility would need extensive upgrades. Then RDCO studied water from Okanagan Lake (Mr Kubas water licence) August 2007. Then RDCO studied joining all of us with La Casa existing water system in the Jan 2008 water study. In the La Casa study it shows that La Casa has approx 500 lots and have 2 - 75 hp but the study shows we will be buying 2-250 hp pumps to help support La Casa's pumping deficiency. Then the latest study (Consultant pointed fingers at a couple spots at Fintry Delta that could be test drilled) was completed June 23, 2008 and nothing has occurred since and up until just now that Jim Edgson called this water meeting for Dec 4, 2008.

It sure is taking forever and costing residents approx. $200 per month is = $2,400 per year for water. These residents are pouring $2,400 per year down the drain when they could be paying for a water system instead.
Its past time Jim Edgson got off his butt and got on with this!! If Jim Edgson was paying the water bill for hauling, we would have had a water system starting to be built already!

Signed,
Valley of the Sun property owner

Blue Divider Line

City of Vernon BC allows a dual water pipe system, one for potable water and the other for irrigation and fire protection.

If the water distribution system is split to provide separate irrigation and domestic service, fire protection must be available from one of the water systems to meet IAO requirements at all times of the year.

Blue Divider Line

Jim Edgson website plus newspaper article

This is a Vernon Morning Star article published November 19, 2008 regarding water for Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun.

okanaganlakebc.ca feels Jim Edgson is spreading false rumour by way of his personal website www.edgson.ca in the November 2008 newsletter, as well as by way of the Vernon Morning Star article below.  Dec 8, 2008 we sent an email asking Jim Edgson to correct his website, so Jim may have changed it now.

Not entirely true.  Jim Edgson newspaper article regarding Valley of the Sun and Upper Fintry is not exactly true.
click article to read larger print

okanaganlakebc.ca feels the article above is very misleading, plus

Jim Edgson's website states the following:
"The North Westside Water Feasibility Study for Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun was initiated in November of 2007 and has been ongoing since."

Is that right JIM?

Meaning of initiate from Merriam Webster Online Dictionary
1 : to cause or facilitate the beginning of : set going <initiate a program of reform> <enzymes that initiate fermentation>

Is Jim Edgson trying to tell people that he was elected in November 2007 election and that he initiated these water studies, because that is what it looks like.

okanaganlakebc.ca would like to bring to your attention when the North Westside Water feasibility studies were actually initiated as stated on the Regional Districts website. http://www.regionaldistrict.com/departments/engineering/engineering_studies_casalomalakeviewsewer.aspx

Letter to Residents (May 2007)

March 26, 2007 Report to Regional Board

In the spring of 2007, responding to several requests, the Regional District of Central Okanagan began a process to investigate the feasibility of establishing a water service for residents of Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun. The Fintry Delta area has been included in the study area because of its proximity to the neighbouring areas. A consultant was contracted for the study to provide recommendations for the best approach to service existing lots with water.

In September 2007, a Water Study was completed by Agua Consulting Inc. The Regional District sent a letter to area residents informing them that the study has been completed and was available for viewing.

It is also stated in this same newspaper article above that Jim Edgson initiated the garbage study at La Casa ... maybe that part about La Casa is true but the people here initiated RDCO to finally get up off their duff and do something about the garbage problem as residents have been waiting for more transfer stations as stated in the North Westside Road 1999 Official Community Plan page 55 and 56. The Regional District sent out a solid waste survey to residents in approx. August 2006 regarding garbage transfer stations only after the Regional District received a petition from residents .... so really residents initiated the garbage study as well as the water study.

Now did Jim Edgson tell the newspaper reporter Richard Rolke that he initiated these studies or did Richard Rolke just make that up for the hell of it!  Our perception is the former.

If you want to know the truth, it has been Jim Edgson who has been dragging this on costing residents money to haul their water at about $200 per month and sitting on the study by Summit Environmental completed July 23, 2008 until the latest meeting Dec, 4, 2008.  Most likely due to Jim Edgson's involvement with fire protection for Trepanier and sewer for Brent Road, plus the re-election.

There was at the beginning, a Valley of the Sun water committee, but we don't know what ever happened to them.  The water committee have done nothing and let Jim Edgson do nothing.  Now at the Dec 4, 2008 water meeting Jim Edgson hand picked a steering committee (which included some of the members from the first Valley of the Sun water committee) and they haven't given out any contact information.  okanaganlakebc.ca believes a new water committee with new members should be sought, and a committee that Jim Edgson does not hand pick.

Progress on the Upper Fintry, Shalal Road and Valley of the Sun water system

March 26, 2007 Engineering department to retain a consultant

May 24, 2007 Letter to residents stating a study is underway

August 27, 2007 NW Side water servicing report by Agua Consulting

September 26, 2007 NW Side water servicing report by RDCO

October 4, 2007 Letter to residents (notice of meeting)

November 5, 2007 RDCO presentation to residents

January 2008 La Casa water study

June 23, 2008 Summit Environmental report (test drill sites at Fintry Delta)

November 12, 2008 Letter to residents (notice of meeting)

Dec 4, 2008 RDCO staff and COW Director Presentation to Residents

http://www.regionaldistrict.com/departments/engineering/engineering_studies_casalomalakeviewsewer.aspx#NWwater

Blue Divider Line

To Valley of the Sun:

- If there were to be a forest fire and there was only one water system for three subdivisions, then when that first water system (Fintry Delta for instance) was overcome by fire there would be no water for the other subdivisions.  Its not like the campers at the park haven't lit the dry grassy field across the paved road from the campsites on fire before.  Those campers and the dry grassy field are a fire hazard!  Wouldn't it be nice if that dry grassy field were a boat trailer parking lot instead?  The boaters could have a boat launch right there keeping the boaters and beach goers apart and making the area safer for the beach goers with little kids.

- If there were two water pipes, one for domestic water and the other for irrigation and fighting a forest fire, and if the water ran out during a fire, a pond or other source of water could be pumped through the fire hydrants without fear of contaminating the potable water pipeline. If there is just one pipeline this can’t be done, and when we run out of water … it’s all over.  The criteria in the water study is about 1.6 hours or something like that I think I read ... so you turn your roof sprinkler on 1/2 hour before the fire gets here if you have that amount of time and now you are left with just a little over an hour of fire protection.... wouldn't it be nice if hot ashes were flying that you could keep your roof sprinklers sprinkling longer than just over an hour and a half?

- If water was found behind Valley of the Sun, a shorter pipeline to Valley of the Sun may be possible, thus costing residents less for excavation and maybe pipe if residents decided on just one pipeline. A transmission main to hook up to La Casa according to the study costs over 1 million dollars and distribution pipe throughout Valley of the Sun is approx. $675,000 according to one of those reports.

- What proof is there that there is no water behind Valley of the Sun, as rumour has it? The mine is full of water and so are the ponds. There is also an underground stream that runs down alongside Firewood Road which is shown on RDCO's water map on page 17. There are some working wells here, but not everyone that drilled found water. But it’s not like there is no water at all here.  There are differing ways of water collection.  Here are some photos of the water at Valley of the Sun.

- Excavation costs are enormous and a shorter pipeline would be cheaper over the long term than a longer pipeline, especially when it has to be dug up and replaced. How long do water lines usually last before needing replacement, that I’m not sure, but I do know from experience that the copper water pipes in homes have a life span of approx. 25 years before they start leaking.  I did email Jim Edgson and RDCO asking them this question but I doubt I will receive an answer.

- A well behind Valley of the Sun may provide enough potable water for just Valley of the Sun not including fire protection and irrigation and not including enough water for Upper Fintry. If enough potable water were to be found just for Valley of the Sun, the ponds and or cisterns could be utilized for irrigation and fire protection purposes.  Shalal Road could draw their water from Shorts Creek.  Upper Finty and Lower Fintry could go together on a water system if there is no water found behind Upper Fintry which there may or may not be. Has a study been done near or above Upper Fintry for a water source??  There was one location drilled according the Upper Fintry water study which did not produce water.

- Has a water witcher gone out before they test drilled?  I know a well known water witcher from Armstrong. I am sure it wouldn’t cost us much more than $500-$600 for a couple of days for him to go out back and see if he finds water. I think it is worth a try. If there is no water then we have only lost $500-$600 and we would have the satisfaction knowing that Fintry Delta or some other source farther away is our best choice to draw water from. If no study for water is done behind Valley of the Sun. then won’t Valley of the Sun be wondering if there really was no water behind us.  Maybe what some are saying is just rumour and not based on fact?  Collectively all our thoughts together, just may come up with something good?

- Myself I feel we have gone about looking for water backwards. In my opinion what should have been done first and foremost was to do a study and see if there is enough water available from behind Valley of the Sun and then progress farther away if nothing was found, and not start looking for water the farthest away over at La Casa or way down at Fintry Delta first like what has been done.  If water was found at Valley of the Sun then maybe the La Casa study didn't have to be done and we wasted money there!  Maybe studies have been done behind Valley of the Sun already that I don’t know about, but I can’t seem to locate any and until I hear that the rumour going around isn’t just hearsay, then maybe I will believe there is not enough water closer to Valley of the Sun.

- A gravity fed system would be far less costly than purchasing pumps to pump water all the way from Fintry Delta up the hill here to Valley of the Sun.  Plus water mains are more expensive than distribution pipe and I imagine its approx. 4 km's from Fintry Delta to Valley of the Sun which would require a water main which may cost over $1,000,000

Valley of the Sun resident

Blue Divider Line

Upper Fintry Groundwater Report

on page 2 says;

  • The fire protection system developed here would not have the flow capacity to fight a major forest fire.

on page 6 it says;

  • Based on RDCO guidelines the maximum daily water demand for the 142 residential lots is as follows: (2,400 L/ca/day x 3 persons/lot x 142 lots) / (86,400 sec/day) = 11.8 L/s (188 US gpm)

  • Based on the MOE Rural Design Guidelines the maximum daily water demands per household could be reduced to 6,100 L/house/day.  This number takes into account the irrigation efficiency as well as the climatic region where the houses are located.

on page 8 says;

  • "A well was drilled to 45m depth on Fairbridge Road in the Upper Fintry develpment but the well log reports no yield."

and on page 12 it says;

  • "Groundwater should be explored as it may be the most cost effective development source".

  • "Total water demand at build-out for 142 SF lots is projected to be 11.8 L/s (188 US gpm)".

  • "The recommended budget for the work is $2,000,000"

 

January 16, 2008 NW Side - La Casa water system integration report

on page 5 it says;

  • Groundwater is recognized as one of the most cost effective methods in which to provide water. The issues related to groundwater are primarily the securing of a groundwater supply of sufficient volume and the water quality produced by the well. The cost to develop a well and set up a pumping system to feed to the distribution system is very straightforward. The difficulty is to verify a source of sufficient capacity to service the entire development.

on page 6 it says;

  • La Casa water system will experience significant upgrades as a result of the integration process, mainly in regards to enhanced disinfection, redundancy in pumping capacity and a higher level of fire protection capacity.

  • - La Casa criteria - Duplex system.  Each pump capable of supplying ADD
    - NW Area criteria - Pump station capable of supplying MDD with larger pump out of service.

on page 8 it says;

  • The fact that La Casa development is not a mobile home park and use/occupation is intermittent explains why the current pump capacity is lower that the RDCO criteria for MDD.  Developments north of La Casa will be permanently occupied making necessary for each upgraded pump to deliver the expected MDD.

on page 11 it says;

  • The integrated system will have two reservoirs, existing 564 m La Casa Reservoir and 608m Valley of the Sun reservoir.

on page 13 it says;

  • Watermain route between La Casa and Upper Fintry should be reviewed to determine the potential for encountering rock.

  • Actual flow records and occupancy for La Casa should be reviewed to obtain a more accurate Maximum Day water demand per occupied RV site.

 

August 27, 2007 Okanagan Lake study

on page 1 it says;

  • The issues of reliability and treatment significantly impact the costs for water supply.

on page 2 it says;

  • The fire protection system developed here would not have the flow capacity to fight a major forest fire.

on page 5 it says;

  • The use of groundwater is possible for Lower Fintry and Upper Fintry.  Currently groundwater to provide for all four developments will be challenging as there may be issues of securing sufficient source capacity form groundwater wells. Water quality information is also limited.

    Groundwater is recognized as one of the most cost effective methods in which to provide water. The issues related to groundwater supply of sufficient volume and the water quality produced by the well. The cost to develop a well and set up a pumping system to feed to the distribution system is very straightforward. The difficulty is to verify a source of sufficient capacity to service the entire development.

  • A review of the Provincial groundwater well database showed that only one large well exists on the Fintry Delta.  Its rated capacity is 500 US gpm which is in the range of what is required for the subject lots to be serviced.  For the purposes of the cost estimate, we estimate that two 21 L/s (330 US gpm) would have to be located and connected to the lower pressure zone area. on page 6 it says the MDD for ultimate build out (492 SFEs) is 41.0 L/s or (650 US gpm)

  • Water quality risks posed by groundwater include the potential for seepage from septic fields in the area, nitrates in the soil, and potential hardness from the well.

on page 6 it says;

  • The topography in the area limits the options for a gravity supply from a reservoir to all four properties. There is one probable high point of land south of the Valley of the Sun.  Based on available topographic information, a potential site for a storage reservoir was identified that could provide a gravity supply system for all four properties. At this time we believe that including Lower Fintry in the system concept is not realistic. This is due to the fact that they have an existing water supply system and would receive no significant benefits for their expenditures that would make them contribute to a larger water system. However, we note that a connection to their system for "Emergency Use" is possible and could be used in the event of a large fire or water main rupture. We have priced out the connection as a potential option for the consideration of that utility and their ratepayers.

on page 8 it says;

  • Because of the large amount of infrastructure that would have to be developed with the base option, we believe that groundwater deserves a very close review as a source water option.  The development of two large 21 L/s wells would provide adequate water, redundancy in supply and would be a very cost effective alternative to development of the lake source.

  • The application of groundwater as a source for this development is very good. There are no large areas to be irrigated and the majority of the water is primarily required for domestic use.

on page 10 it says;

  • Consideration should be given to reduced water demands based on source capacity and costs. It may be possible to provide water for domestic purposes and fire protection without water for outdoor irrigation. This concept should be investigated as the cost to provide indoor potable water only significantly reduces the system capacity requirements. A special service area complete with water use bylaws would have to be developed for this to occur.  (Note* You would think this would reduce the time length of fire protection)

  • Groundwater may be the most cost effective alternative, however the viability of groundwater for this application has yet to be proven.

Blue Divider Line

RDCO water and sewer map

Blue Divider Line

Here is what we came up with placing the water system studies closer together (and still working on this)

# of Lots
Upper Fintry = 185
Valley of the Sun = 147
Shalal Road = 14
Lower Fintry (Delta) = 117
La Casa = 480


Water Demand

August 27, 2008 Okanagan Lake report from page 6 (MDD means Maximum Daily Water Demand)
MDD for;

  • 409 SFE's 34.1 L/s (540 US gpm)

  • 492 SFE's 41.0 L/s (650 US gpm)

Okanagan Lake report August 27, 2007 report page 10
The total water demand at build-out for 492 SFE lots is projected to be 41.0 L/s (650 US gpm)

August 27, 2008 Okanagan Lake report from page 9
  - Single family fire demand is based on providing flow at 75 L/s for 1.67 hours.
  - Multi-family development fireflow is based on providing a flow of 150 L/s for 2.0 hours.

Upper Fintry Groundwater Report on page 2 it says;
- Average Daily Demand (ADD) 900 litres /capita / day
- Maximum Day Demand (MDD) 2,400 litres /capita / day
- Peak Hour Demand (PHD) 4,000 litres /capita / day
- Non-Sprinklered Fire Demand / duration SF Unit = minimum of 75 L/s for 1.67 hours
- Non-Sprinklered Fire Demand / duration MF Unit = minimum of 150 L/s for 2.0 hours
- Sprinklered Fire Demand / duration SF Unit = Can reduce the fire flow duration by amount as set out by FUS Guidelines (max of 50%) SF - 40 L/s for 1.25 hours
Upper Fintry Groundwater Report on page 12 it says;
"Total water demand at build-out for 142 SF lots is projected to be 11.8 L/s (188 US gpm)

January 16, 2008 La Casa report page 6
Average Daily Demand (ADD)
       - La Casa Criteria 1,250 L/day/lot
       - NW Area Criteria 2,700 L/day/SFE

Maximum Daily Demand (MDD)
       - La Casa Criteria 5,683 L/day/lot
       - NW Area Criteria 7,200 L/day/SFE

Peak Hour Demand (PHD)
       - La Casa Criteria N/A L/day/lot
       - NW Area Criteria 12,000 L/day/SFE

Fireflow (FF)
       - La Casa Criteria 30.3 L/s
       - NW Area Criteria FUS Requirement


Reservoir Calculation

UF Report page 10
  - RDCO criteria Reservoir Calculation 50 SF Units = 652 m
  - RDCO criteria Reservoir Calculation 142 SF Units = 860 m
  - MOE Guidelines 50 SF Units = 280 m
  - MOE Guidelines 142 SF Units - 600 m


La Casa report page 3
   - 1,109 m La Casa's current concrete reservoir

August 27, 2008 Okanagan Lake report page 8
  -  409 SFEs 1485 m
  -  492 SFEs (build-out) 1671 m
  -  492 SFE's plus MF fireflow 2,457 m

August 27, 2008 Okanagan Lake report from page 9
  - Single family fire demand is based on providing flow at 75 L/s for 1.67 hours.
  - Multi-family development fireflow is based on providing a flow of 150 L/s for 2.0 hours
This would increase the fire storage component of the reservoir from 563 m to 1350 m.  An additional 787 m of storage must be constructed.  This additional cost should be borne by the development requiring the higher fire flow rates.  The estimated additional cost is $390,000.


Reservoirs

UF report page 12
  - 50 Units $384,780
  - 142 Units $465,900

La Casa report page 15
  - 608m Reservoir $537,500

August 27, 2008 Okanagan Lake report (514  Reservoir and pump station) page 9
Kubas (1) + Valley of the Sun (203 connections) = $472,500
Kubas (2) + Valley of the Sun (286 connections)= $472,500
Kubas (1) + VOS + Upper Fintry (409 connections)= $472,500
Kubas (2) + VOS + Upper Fintry (492 connections) = $472,500
(492 connections) Groundwater = $0.00
August 27, 2008 Okanagan Lake report (600m Reservoir) from page 9
Kubas (1) + Valley of the Sun (203 connections) = $495,690
Kubas (2) + Valley of the Sun (286 connections)= $568,230
Kubas (1) + VOS + Upper Fintry (409 connections)= $676,260
Kubas (2) + VOS + Upper Fintry (492 connections) = $749,190
(492 connections) Groundwater = $749,190
Single family fire demand is based on providing flow at 75 L/s for 1.67 hours.  Multi-family development fire flow is based on providing a flow of 150 L/s for 2.0 hours.  This would increase the fire storage component of the reservoir from 563 m to 1350 m.  An additional 787 m of storage must be constructed.  This additional cost must be borne by the development requiring higher fire flow rates.  The additional cost is $390,000.


Domestic Distribution System

UF report page 12
  - 50 Units $542,750
  - 142 Units $841,825

La Casa report page 14
  - Upper Fintry $810,025
  - VOS $675,275
  - Kubas $225,250

Okanagan Lake report August 27, 2007 page 9
  - Upper Fintry $772,350
  - Valley of the Sun $675,275
  - Kubas $225,250 - $316,550


Transmission Mains

La Casa report page 14 - $1,075,800

Upper Fintry report page 13 - 142 lots Upper Fintry 200 mm WM - Source main, Pump house to reservoir (steep section) $112,875

Okanagan Lake August 27, 2007 report page 9
203 lots Kubas (1) + VOS = $271,600
286 lots Kubas (2) + VOS = $271,600
409 lots Kubas (1) + VOS + UF = $589,100
492 lots Kubas (2) + VOS + UF = $589,100
492 lots Groundwater = $589,100

The $589,100 may be the cost of the transmission main from Upper Fintry to Valley of the Sun.


Distribution System / Pump Station

UF Report page 12
  - 50 Unites $225,000
  - 142 Units $225,000

La Casa Report page 14
  - Lake Pump Station $425,000
  - PZ564 to PZ608m Pump Station $447,500

Okanagan Lake August 27, 2007 report 514 Reservoir and Pump station page 9
203 lots Kubas (1) + VOS = $472,500
286 lots Kubas (2) + VOS = $472,500
409 lots Kubas (1) + VOS + UF = $472,500
492 lots Kubas (2) + VOS + UF = $472,500
492 lots Groundwater = $0.00


Enhanced Disinfection and Water Treatment

La Casa report page 15
  - $733,750


Enhanced Disinfection UV & Chlorination

August 27, 2008 Okanagan Lake report page 9
(203 lots) Kubas (1) + VOS = $432,500
(286 lots) Kubas (2) + VOS = $447,500
(409 lots) Kubas (1) + VOS + UF = $495,000
(492 lots) Kubas (2) + VOS + UF = $495,000
(492 lots) Groundwater = $60,000
Please note that the cost for a water filtration plant was not included in the base cost estimate.  The water treatment building footprint should be planned for a water filtration plant for the future.  If a water filtration plant is required for this project please allow for costs in the range of $900,000 (operational costs will be in addition to this amount).
on page 10 it says: Should the Okanagan Lake option be pursued further, confirmation must be obtained from IHA in writing if water filtration will be required for water supply to the existing lots;


Chlorination System

UF Report page 13
Service Area Pump Station - Chlorination System (Sodium hypo, containment and eyewash) $25,000


Water Filtration Plant (Not included in Okanagan Lake Cost Estimate)

August 27, 2007 Okanagan Lake report page 9
  - 2 stage cartridge filter system $900,000
  - pressurized filtration $1,550,000
  - membrane filtration $1,900,000
For the build-out water demands, the cost for filtration is estimated to be $900,000 for a two stage cartridge filter system.  The first stage would be a spinning back washable filter.  The second stage would be cartridge filters that require changing on a normal frequency basis.  A pressurized filtration system would be in the range of $1,550,000 and a membrane filtration system would cost in the range of $1,900,000.
Please note that the cost for a water filtration plant was not included in the base cost estimate.  The water treatment building footprint should be planned for a water filtration plant for the future.  If a water filtration plant is required for this project please allow for costs in the range of $900,000 (operational costs will be in addition to this amount).


RDCO's Fees

La Casa report page 12 (492 connections)
Engineering 10% = $493,010
Contingency 15% = $739,515
Interim Project Financing Fee 10% = $616,263
RDCO Administrative Fee 3% = $184,879

Upper Fintry Report page 12 -13

RDCO Administration Fee 3%
50 Units RDCO criteria = $44,191
142 Units RDCO criteria = $57,878
50 Units MOE criteria = $38,968
142 Units MOE criteria = $54,228

Engineering and Contingency 20%
50 Units RDCO criteria = $245,506
142 Units RDCO criteria = $321,545
50 Units MOE criteria = $216,490
142 Units MOE criteria = $301,265
Don't see Interim project financing fee of 10% on UF report.  Plus Engineering and Contingency Fee is 20% unlike the 25% cost for engineering and contingency fee on the La Casa report?

Okanagan Lake report August 27, 2007 report page 9
Engineering 10%
Kubas (1) + Valley of the Sun (203 connections) = $341,032
Kubas (2) + Valley of the Sun (286 connections)= $358,916
Kubas (1) + VOS + Upper Fintry (409 connections)= $474,324
Kubas (2) + VOS + Upper Fintry (492 connections) = $490,747
Groundwater (492 connections) = $352,247
Contingency 10%
Kubas (1) + Valley of the Sun (203 connections) = $511,547
Kubas (2) + Valley of the Sun (286 connections)= $538,373
Kubas (1) + VOS + Upper Fintry (409 connections)= $711,485
Kubas (2) + VOS + Upper Fintry (492 connections) = $736,120
Groundwater (492 connections) = $528,370
RDCO Administrative Fee
Kubas (1) + Valley of the Sun (203 connections) = $127,887
Kubas (2) + Valley of the Sun (286 connections)= $134,593
Kubas (1) + VOS + Upper Fintry (409 connections)= $177,871
Kubas (2) + VOS + Upper Fintry (492 connections) = $184,030
Groundwater (492 connections) = $132,092
Don't see Interim project financing fee of 10% on VOS report.


Cost per Connection

La Casa report page 15
$14,154 (492 connections)

Okanagan Lake report August 27, 2007 report page 9
Kubas (1) + Valley of the Sun (203 connections) = $21,629
Kubas (2) + Valley of the Sun (286 connections)= $16,157
Kubas (1) + VOS + Upper Fintry (409 connections)= $14,931
Kubas (2) + VOS + Upper Fintry (492 connections) = $12,842
(492 connections) Groundwater = $9,218

Upper Fintry Feb 27, 2007 report page 12
RDCO Criteria 50 Units = $30,345
RDCO Criteria 142 Units = $13,994
MOE Criteria 50 Units = $26,758
MOE Criteria 142 Units = $13,111

 


Deep Lake Intake / 2 Groundwater Wells for GW option

Okanagan Lake report August 27, 2007 report page 9
Kubas (1) + Valley of the Sun (203 connections) = $175,000
Kubas (2) + Valley of the Sun (286 connections)= $175,000
Kubas (1) + VOS + Upper Fintry (409 connections)= $175,000
Kubas (2) + VOS + Upper Fintry (492 connections) = $175,000
(492 connections) Groundwater = $360,000

 

 

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– November 24, 2008

North Westside Community Water Study
The Regional Board has directed staff to create a plan and schedule in order to continue the project looking at options and costs of providing a community water system for the upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun subdivisions in the North Westside Road area.
The Regional District will continue the consultation process with area residents to determine the preferred options and level of support while investigating possible sources that could be used to provide water service to the more than 340 properties that do not have a community water system.

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November 24, 2008 Regional District of Central Okanagan Board Agenda

Item 9.1 Governance and Services Committee Report Nov 13.pdf

8) Upper Fintry/Valley of the Sun Water Distribution System

Staff report dated November 5th outlined that there are two subdivisions in Central Okanagan West Electoral Area where there is no community water and residents are required to transport their daily water requirements. The Upper Fintry subdivision has 201 parcels. The Valley of the Sun subdivision has 144 parcels. Historically these were dry land subdivisions. The Regional District receives several phone calls each year from owners interested in the feasibility of the Regional District providing community water to these subdivisions and what the associated costs would be. Staff believe it would be prudent to consider both areas rather than each subdivision in isolation.

In 2007 feasibility studies (Agua Consulting Inc. including the Northwest Side Water Report (August 2007), and the Integration with La Casa Water System - Preliminary Report (January 2008), and a Technical Memorandum regarding Fintry Delta Groundwater - Potential Test Well Sites by Summit Environmental Consultants Ltd. dated June 23, 2008), for the provision of water to these North Westside communities were completed. Costs were presented but were extremely preliminary and did not include engineering design and inspection, nor costs such as land acquisition, statutory rights of way, surveying and legal fees. These cost must be further reviewed before property owners can be petitioned for support. Should support occur, staff will bring forward a report on what the costs would be to proceed with a water system to these areas.

Recommendation

THAT the Regional Board direct the Development & Environmental Services to create a plan and a schedule to follow in order to continue with the project of providing water service to the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun communities;

AND FURTHER THAT a public consultation process be developed to work with area residents to determine preferred options and the level of support of the establishment of a community water system;

AND FURTHER THAT Development & Environmental Services continue to investigate possible water sources to service the proposed community water system.

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RDCO has sat on the latest water system study since June 23, 2008.  June 12, 2008 the company (Summit Environmental) visited Fintry Delta, and Summits report is dated June 23, 2008.  Jim Edgson said at the Governance and Services Committee meeting Nov 13, 2008 that there is a right-of-way already there in the Park at Fintry Delta ready to lay pipe in.  There was no mention of doing a water study behind Valley of the Sun to see what water may be higher up and could feed Valley of the Sun as a gravity fed system.

 Nov 13, 2008 Governance and Services Committee Agenda

Item 6.4 Upper Fintry Valley of the Sun Proposed Water System Update.pdf

Recommendation (from page 1)
THAT the Governance and Services Committee receive the attached reports by Agua Consulting inc,

- Northwest Side Water Report (August, 2007)

- Integration with La Casa Water System - Preliminary Report (January 16, 2008)

and a Technical Memorandum regarding Fintry Delta Groundwater - Potential Test Well Sites by Summit Environmental Consultants Ltd and dated June 23, 2008 (on page 19).

AND THAT Development & Environmental Services create a plan and a schedule to follow, in order to continue with the project of providing water service to the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun Communities.

AND FURTHER THAT a public consultation process be developed to work with area residents to determine preferred options and the level of support for the establishment of a community water system;

AND FURTHER THAT Development & Environmental Services continue to investigate possible water sources to service the proposed community water system.

-------------------------

From (page 2)

Both reports provide a series of cost estimates for capital works based on different options of service. Costs range from $9,218 per unit to $21,629 per unit. It is important to note that these costs are extremely preliminary and do not include engineering design and inspections, nor many other costs such as land acquisitions, statutory rights of way, surveying, and legal fees. These costs must be further evaluated and reviewed before the property owners can be petitioned for support. If support is eventually received from the community, staff will develop a strategy for implementing a water service to the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun communities.

-----------------------------

Discussion (page 20)

Sites A, B, C and F are furthest from both Shorts Creek and Okanagan Lake and so have a higher probability of being classified as true groundwater sources (not GUDI), and so from this standpoint, appear favourable. All of these sites, however, are located relatively near to probable on-site sewerage (septic) systems, but sufficient setback distance can likely be obtained (30 metres).

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Deadline extended for water project
By Jackie Pearase - Vernon Morning Star - Published: November 18, 2008

An attempt to extend the viability of its soon-to-be upgraded water system has resulted in Armstrong needing an extension to its project deadline.

Armstrong has permission from the province to extend the deadline by four months to allow the city to obtain approvals from Interior Health for changes to several components of the project.

The city received a grant of $1.4 million from the General Strategic Priorities Fund Program to upgrade its water supply system on Fortune Creek.

The plan includes using UV disinfection to treat the water and work is being done to increase the equipment’s efficiency to allow it to be used during spring freshet, a time when such equipment is not normally used because it does not provide sufficient disinfectant power to meet Ministry of Health requirements.

If the modifications are successful and approved by IH, the city will maximize usage of its gravity-fed source, provide better quality surface water and end severe water restrictions during freshet when the groundwater supply capacity is limited.

Negotiations with IH have delayed construction, making the May 1, 2009 deadline impossible to meet.

Coun. John Trainor expressed frustration over the lack of province wide water quality guidelines.

He said the PPM (parts per million) standard for some areas of B.C. are very different from other parts, which makes it unfairly difficult for some municipalities to provide safe drinking water.

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North Westside Water Service Feasibility Study
September 2008: Reviews are underway of various completed studies relating to the development of a community water system for the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun areas. This information and an update of cost estimates is expected to be presented during a public information meeting to be scheduled this fall. A date, time and location will be publicized and when confirmed that information will be available here.

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April 30, 2008 Regional Board Agenda
Planning Services Department Report from Leah Hartley, Planner
April 23, 2007
Crown Land and Resource Referral Procedures (File # 3020-01)

RECOMMENDATION:
1. THAT Regional District's Crown Land and Resource Referral Policy and Procedures are amended as noted in this report.

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March 26, 2007 Regional Board Agenda
Engineering Committee March 20, 2007 meeting
Regional Board Report
Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun - Water

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How to clean your hot water tank

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BC Water Resource Atlas - Map shows water wells, streams, etc.

We count 19 wells on DL 2922 at Valley of the Sun

We count 4 wells on DL 2920 at Upper Fintry

We count 5 wells on DL 686 at Lower Fintry

We count 1 artesian well on La Casa's DL 3849. down nearer to the lake.

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Tulameens 325 water connection community water system

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Okanagan-Shuswap Land and Resource Management Plan
The Okanagan-Shuswap LRMP is an approved strategic land use plan within the Province of British Columbia. The plan area is characterised by rapid population growth, a diversifying economy and unique environmental settings - resulting in a range of interests and potential expectations. In conjunction with other legislation, the plan sets an integrated overall strategic direction for the management of crown lands within the Okanagan/Shuswap (Okanagan TSA).

The plan was developed by consensus among representation stakeholder groups over the period 1995 - 2000 and will be a living 'web based' plan - reflecting the ongoing consideration of research, management and environmental/social/economic expectations. Implementation, featuring public representation, is commencing during 2001.
http://ilmbwww.gov.bc.ca/slrp/lrmp/kamloops/okanagan/index.html

The plan
http://ilmbwww.gov.bc.ca/slrp/lrmp/kamloops/okanagan/plan/files/oslrmpfull.pdf

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North Westside Official Community Plan (OCP) Review and Update
The Development Services Department received direction from the Governance and Services Committee on April 10, 2008 to proceed with a Terms of Reference (TOR) and Request for Proposal (RFP) process with respect to a partial review of existing North Westside OCP Bylaw No. 785. It is anticipated that the project will include review of future land use policies, servicing and infrastructure considerations in context of the Regional Growth Management Strategy, and review of policies and Development Permit (DP) provisions with intent to enforce all environmental components. This would include expansion of existing Aquatic DP Areas and establishing Sensitive Terrestrial DP Areas.

In addition to the above components, issues related to major transportation corridors (ie: capacity of Westside Road and future Okanagan Lake crossing) and recent completion of a water service feasibility study of the upper/lower Fintry and Valley of the Sun areas would be considered and evaluated relative to any major change to OCP development policy.

For more information or copies of documentation, please visit or contact the Development Services Planning Section (250-469-6227).

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Candidates express views on water issues
By Judie Steeves - Kelowna Capital News - Published: November 13, 2008

The questions were about water: Is treatment, governance, protection and use for agriculture, but it was as much an opportunity to get answers as giving them for the Kelowna council candidates at Thursday night’s all-candidates forum.

Many admitted quite frankly they didn’t know that much about the issues when they arrived, but they learned more by the time they left.

The forum opened with a presentation by Bob Hrasko, manager of the Black Mountain Irrigation District and a member of the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council, who described the origins of the city’s five water utilities.

Company irrigation began in the 1890s, in order to make dry land marketable, and with that, agriculture evolved from tobacco, livestock and grain to the lush green of orchards.

Wooden flumes were used to carry water down from storage in the upper watersheds. By 1914 public irrigation corporations were formed and within a few years, the province began to set aside funds for investment in the water infrastructure.

In 1914, it was still irrigation by flume and furrow, but there was a drought from 1929 to 1931 and dams were seen as a way to prevent such a hardship from re-occurring.

Hrasko said water is a service, not a private commodity. Only bottled water is water for profit, and by using bottled water, he said you’re diverting revenue away from investing in provision of the service.

In 1967 to 1972 irrigation systems were pressurized and in recent years, many farms have converted overhead irrigation to drip irrigation.

Today, he said we are faced with having to spend $70 million to achieve the essential levels of disinfection of drinking water or $200 million to reach the desired level of treatment, by filtration as well.

Candidates were then given a selection of four questions to speak on for just two minutes.

On the issue of source water protection, candidate John Zeger said it’s essential that we limit the size of the community because there’s a finite amount of water.

Mary-Ann Graham said it’s important that the upper lakes be protected with public ownership of foreshore land.

Jerry Hlady said councillors would have to do their research, and he’d learned a lot at the forum.

Incumbent Robert Hobson said regional cooperation on water issues is essential; we need to complete drought management plans; protect the watersheds and learn more about what’s being discharged in sewage effluent; license groundwater and keep human development away from riparian areas.

Luke Stack said when there are multiple users of a resource there can be failure if they can’t cooperate so he favours regional management of the resource; watershed restoration work, and management of riparian areas.

Toby Pike agreed there must be upper watershed protection. He advocated local authority over the use of Crown land in the upper watersheds and said to protect groundwater there should be a geothermal database to look at potential sources of contamination of groundwater.

On the issue of a water governance model for Kelowna, Lisa Simone called for coordination, while Mark Thompson advocated amalgamation. “We need a water assurance authority in the valley with a mandate from the province.

John Manton warned we live in a desert and we have to start treating it like that and become more aggressive about conservation of water, including doing away with sprinkler systems and using drip irrigation; and doing away with grass in new developments.

On the question of water treatment and funding, Bill Vaughn recommended creation of new and innovative ways of finding extra sources of funding, while Matthew Reed said we must deal with the issue of prescription medications getting into our drinking water through discharge from sewage treatment plants.

On the issue of water for agriculture and support for the Agriculture Land Reserve, Dorothee Birker said it’s vital we support people living on ALR land by buying local food and advocating for stores to carry local food products.

Angela Reid supports the ALR and said we need to look more at new ways to recycle water and conserve it.

Gunnar Forsstrom said we should have a two-tier system of water delivery with treated water for domestic use and untreated for irrigating.

Kevin Craig said the community must be responsible stewards of a finite resource, but protect agricultural land.

Janice Henry, noted that the oldest industrial building in Kelowna is Brent’s Mill, a grist mill that ground flour for everyone in the region in the late 1800s.

jsteeves "at" kelownacapnews.com

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Westside gives sewer second look
Castanet.net by Wayne Moore - Story: 42790 - Oct 31, 2008

Westside landowners scheduled to receive sewer service over the next six years got a break from the municipality.

A week ago council decided to go ahead with the entire sewer extension project, despite the fact government grants would be a lot lower than originally anticipated.

It was anticipated the municipality would be in line to receive up to $15 million in grants. Westside learned that figure would be closer to $6 million.

Going ahead with the entire project in one grant application meant each landowner would pay more that $12,500 for the service, not including the cost of hooking up to the sewer system.

Tuesday, council amended that decision at the urging of Mayor Rosalind Neis.

"Subsequent to our council, I had a conversation with the province and new information has come forward. The Premier's address on Wednesday in regards to infrastructure and the province's desire to accelerate programs for local governments, I've been assured there will be other programs available for funding with regard to our sewer program," says Neis.

She had asked that council commit to funding only the first five phases through the first grant application and wait for further programs before applying for grants to complete the final six phases.

The cost per homeowner in the first five phases would be slightly more than $8,100.

The first five phases, all scheduled to be complete no later than 2010 include:

Applegreen Crescent and Cameron Road
Glenrosa Phase 2 - Ranch Road/Country Pines
Glenrosa Phase 7 - Pineridge Place
Glenrosa Phase 2 - Thacker North
Lakeview Phase 6 - Hayman Road.

Six other phases in the Lakeview Heights and Glenrosa areas, are scheduled for completion between 2011 and 2014.

Councillor Doug Findlater told council the advice the mayor received, to apply for funding in small chunks, is the same advice he has been given over the past number of years in dealing with senior levels of government.

"If you ask for the moon you won't get it but if you ask for it a bit at a time, you will eventually get the moon, or most of it," says Findlater.

"We may quibble on some of the numbers here but I think we do have to re-consider this. This is a priority in this community. We have to get going on it."

Findlater says he doesn't think landowners will agree to pay more than $12,000 for sewer.

"It has to be made more affordable."

Councillor Duane Ophus, while agreeing to take another look at the funding proposal, says looking for funding in small chunks is exactly what put the Regional District and now the municipality in the position it finds itself in now.

"When the Regional District started this program a number of years ago, they got a certain amount of grant money. What they should have done with that money is they should have spread it across the total number of connections that needed to be done throughout the entire Westside," says Ophus.

"They did not do that, they chose to subsidize exactly what is being proposed here on a staged basis a smaller number of installations, so they could reduce the price of each installation."

Instead of going with the proposal suggested by Neis, Council instead agreed to fund the first eight phases through the current grant application and postpone the final three phases, Hudson Road, McGinnis Road and Gates Road for a future grant application.

With the new proposal, landowners will be asked to pay slightly more than $10,000 for sewer.

Following the meeting, Neis says she was somewhat pleased at the compromise council made.

"I would have liked to see an $8,000 per head parcel because I do firmly believe there will be funding in the future for all phases, and the one they did include is a costly phase, more than $3.5 million, and I feel there could have been an opportunity for those residents to have additional savings, but it's the will of council and at least it is an improvement over what we had last week."

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La Casa's pump capacity is set out with the assumption that not all of the RV lots would be occupied at any one time. Each of the two lake pumps has 18.9 L/s capacity or about 58% of the total demand.
The existing Okanagan Lake Pump Station has two 75 hp vertical turbine pumps. A flow of 59.9 L/s will require the installation of two 250 hp pumps, each capable of providing the Max. day demand for Build-Out No. 2 which is 492 SFE units.  492 = VOS 153 + UF & Shalal Road 206 + Kubas 133.  Actual flow records and occupancy for La Casa should be reviewed to obtain a more accurate Maximum Day water demand per occupied RV site.  The system currently does not meet the IHA requirement for two types of treatment or the disinfection of Cryptosporidium. (Jan 08 Agua study)

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Search the Ministry's Water Licence Database

Water Licence No C120927 from Okanagan Lake Purpose Domestic, 2000 Gallons Per Day Lonny Kubas

Water Rights Information
http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/wsd/water_rights/water_rights.html

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Stream diversion proves costly
By Judie Steeves - Kelowna Capital News - Published: October 30, 2008

A Joe Rich property owner has been convicted of filling in a stream, which is a side channel to Mission Creek, without the approval of the environment ministry.

Marcel Bruneau was charged under the water act with placing an obstruction in the channel on Feb. 19, 2007 and ticketed.

However, he disputed the ticket, the matter went to court and because he didn’t show up for his court appearance this week, he was found guilty. He will now have to pay his $230 fine.

Conservation officer Ed Seitz said Bruneau had removed an old bridge from across the side channel and replaced it with fill.

“In a high water year that would have caused flooding and the water could have blown that dirt out into Mission Creek where it would have impacted fish habitat,” explained Seitz.

He said side channels are considered streams under the water act, even if they are seasonal. The contractor on that job was also ticketed and fined under the act, said Seitz.

Such work in wetlands, streams and other bodies of water are a frequent problem in this area with so much development occurring now, commented Seitz.

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October 1998 Fintry Provincial Park Management Plan

5.7 WATER LICENSES (page 42)
Fintry has six water licenses which were granted for irrigation and domestic purposes associated with the previous agricultural use and private development plans on District Lots 686 and 2920.
Two licenses on Shorts Creek total 362 acre feet per annum, with one of the licenses providing capacity for 1,000 gallons per day for domestic use. Four licenses on Okanagan Lake add 521.5 acre feet per annum, with one license providing 500 gallons per day for domestic use.
Considerations:
Water license capacity may be greater than is required for future park needs, considering as well the groundwater supply now provided at Fintry.
Management of creek flows for spawning may require flow assessment and greater storage during the summer, for release during the low flow autumn period.
A future satellite fire and rescue station is under consideration along Westside Road. There may be a desire to permit filling of pumper trucks from Shorts Creek at Westside Road.
Objectives:
To assess water requirements associated with future uses at Fintry, and to use existing licenses and groundwater sources in meeting these needs.
To cooperate with BC Environment officials in restoring creek flows for fish spawning.
To cooperate with neighboring communities in ensuring that fire suppression needs are met within the region.
Actions:
* Assess water license requirements for future campground, visitor activity, fire suppression and irrigation needs.
* Determine if water licenses on Okanagan Lake are required for long term needs.
* Amend surplus domestic and irrigation water licenses on Shorts Creek to a Fisheries Conservation purpose. Participate in flow management measures to enhance the creek spawning potential.

-------------------------------------------------------

2.7 REGIONAL CONTEXT (page 20)
Fintry is located at the midpoint of Westside Road which serves a corridor of rural development lands situated between Okanagan Lake and upland provincial forest. There are 1,794 legal subdivided properties within the Westside Road Official Community Plan area extending from Bear Creek (Traders Cove) to Killiney Beach. The predominant pattern is half acre country residential development, with settlement areas at 7,000 sq. ft. residential lot sizes. Many of the lots have yet to be built upon, but are held as future housing sites. Population in the Westside Road plan area now stands at 2,400 residents.

The following development enclaves abut or are in the immediate vicinity of Fintry Park.

Fintry Delta South:
A 117 lot residential subdivision is situated on the southern portion of Fintry Delta.
Approximately 35 homes are built, half of the dwellings are summer and weekend residences, half are occupied year round.

Ridgeview (La Casa):
A 480 parcel subdivision is under construction and intended for mobile homes. (District Lots 3849 & 3850 at Westside Road, south of Fintry).
A 100 slip private moorage facility is proposed on the lakeshore.

DunWaters Subdivision (Upper Fintry):
A 185 lot subdivision abuts the southern boundary of Fintry Park, uphill from Westside Road (District Lot 2920).
Roads through the subdivision provide access to a Ministry of Transportation and Highways gravel pit situated south of Shorts Creek.

Shalal Road:
A 14 lot residential subdivision is encircled by Fintry Park along Shalal Road at Westside Road.
Shalal Road leads to a private easement road through Fintry Park, providing access to properties further upstream on Shorts Creek.

Valley of the Sun Subdivision (Firwood Road):
A 100+ residential lot subdivision is centered on Wood and Attenborough Roads, at the northern edge of the park site.
A rezoning application on District Lot 2923 (Kubas in front of Valley of the Sun) is being considered to permit a 13 parcel subdivision on seven existing lots located east of Westside Road, north of the park boundary.
A Land Use Contract (LUC 249) is in effect which would allow a lodge and 150 unit campsite resort to be built adjacent to the park’s northern boundary. (The south side or the La Casa side of Valley of the Sun)
Sites are designated within Valley of the Sun to provide for future community parks, a regional trail staging area, and a future community complex.
Roads within the subdivision provide access to six private gravel pit sites and to Tree Farm License 49A which is situated within Provincial Forest land abutting the park’s western boundary.

Attenborough Road:
Attenborough Road provides public access through Fintry Park from Valley of the Sun to upland private properties and to Crown Lands. The last upland parcel is owned by Nature Trust and leased to BC Environment, Wildlife Branch, for Bighorn Sheep winter range.
Attenborough Road provides access to a private gravel pit within District Lots 4023 and 4690, and possible alternate access to Tree Farm License 49A.

Source (page 21)
http://www.llbc.leg.bc.ca/public/PubDocs/bcdocs/328365/mgmtplns_fintry.pdf

Note*  District Lot 2923 is designated RU2 according to RDCO's map.

This map shows some of District Lot 2923 (Kubas Development in front of Valley of the Sun).  This other map on RDCO's website shows more detail of District Lot 2923.

This document on RDCO's website explains what RU2 developments are required to install as of Aug 2007.  Subdivision and Development Servicing Bylaw No.704 Schedule C.2 – Servicing Requirements

RDCO's Feb 6, 2003 Engineering Committee Minutes about acquiring a private water system (page 4)

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Spallumcheen considering new health plan
By Tyler Olsen - Vernon Morning Star - Published: August 22, 2008

Spallumcheen council and staff could have its hands full in coming years if proposed changes to the province’s Public Health Act go through.

Township administrator Lynda Shykora told council that the proposed changes could have major implications for Spallumcheen, with its territory including multiple water districts.

“There will be some implications where we may have to do a public health plan...sort of like an (official community plan) for health,” said Shykora.

Mayor Will Hansma said that, from his reading of the legislation, the new rules may dictate every level of water government, no matter how small, to have such a plan.

“It does seem that every water authority, no matter how small they are, will need to have a public health plan in place.”

Further complicating things, as a water administration district itself – one that contains within its borders numerous small water districts – Spallumcheen’s plan would need to be able to mesh with the plans of those districts.

With the legislation not yet passed though, the impact is not fully known.

“It’s going to (depend) on how the final legislation comes down,” said Hansma.

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Funds help small communities build for the future
July 13, 2008 - Vernon Morning Star - News - page B25

For the first time, communities with populations of less than 100,000 can now access more funding for cleaner water, better waste management and flood mitigation.

The small B.C. community funding is thanks to a $272-million investment by the federal and provincial governments through the Building Canada Plan.

Until 2014, the federal and provincial governments will each invest $136 million to be applied to projects approved under the communities component, which includes $25 million for flood mitigation.

Together with matching funds from the local governments, $408 million will be available, through until 2014, to help meet the local infrastructure needs and priorities of smaller British Columbia communities.

“Our government is proud to commit this unprecedented level of funding to assist communities with populations of less than 100,000,” said Lawrence Cannon, minister of transport.

“Working with our partners in the spirit of open federalism allows us to provide better sewer, water, local roads, tourism infrastructure, short-sea shipping, and short-line rail, as well as flood mitigation infrastructure. This will make a real difference in the everyday lives of the people in B.C.’s smaller communities.”

Stockwell Day, the federal public safety minister, is pleased with the announcement.

“The communities component will help to address the infrastructure needs of smaller communities to help develop a stronger, safer and better British Columbia,” said Day.

“Building Canada will provide targeted funding for infrastructure projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000 – helping these communities meet their unique challenges.”

Eligible applicants may now submit applications for the first round of the communities component.

The focus of the first intake will be projects related to sewer, water, local roads, tourism infrastructure, short-sea shipping, and short-line rail, as well as flood mitigation.

Projects funded will be selected through a competitive process, with priority given to those demonstrating the principles of sustainability and supporting provincial initiatives such as action on climate change and the objectives in B.C.’s Energy Plan, Living Water Smart and Green Building Code.

Applications are available on the B.C. Secretariat website at www.bcbuildingcanadafundcommunities.ca, with a deadline of Sept. 5.

“Today’s announcement supports our commitment to work in partnership with federal and local governments to ensure high-quality, modern public infrastructure,” said Kevin Falcon, minister of transportation.

“This new infrastructure funding will contribute to long-term economic growth, a clean environment and strong communities.”

“The Province is committed to helping B.C.’s local governments build and improve their communities,” said Blair Lekstrom, Minister of Community Development. “This new infrastructure funding will be key in supporting local governments as they build strong local economies and greener, more sustainable communities.”

“By targeting communities with populations of less than 100,000, the Communities Component will deliver more per-capita funding than the previous Municipal Rural Infrastructure Program,” said Susan Gimse, president of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities. “Building Canada is an excellent example of governments working together to renew infrastructure in B.C. communities.”

All local governments, large and small, will have the opportunity to benefit from Building Canada. Over $1.485 billion will be transferred to British Columbia local governments through the federal Gas Tax Fund between 2007 and 2014. Further, both governments have agreed that a further $78 million will be made available for major projects in communities with populations over 100,000 or to further supplement the Communities Component. In addition, significant funding will flow to major projects of importance to municipalities. For example, Canada and British Columbia today announced a tri-partite working group with representatives from all three levels of government to advance planning and preparations for moving forward on the first phase of the Capital Regional District Sewage Treatment Project.

Through its unprecedented $33-billion Building Canada infrastructure plan, the federal government is providing long-term, stable and predictable funding to help meet infrastructure needs across Canada. Building Canada will support a stronger, safer and better country. On Nov. 6, 2007 the governments of Canada and British Columbia announced the signing of a Framework Agreement under Building Canada worth $2.2 billion.

The Communities Component of the Building Canada Fund will be administered jointly by Western Economic Diversification Canada, and the provincial Ministry of Community Development.

For more information on the Building Canada plan, visit www.buildingcanada.gc.ca.

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ENGINEERING COMMITTEE Minutes of February 6, 2003
Page 4-5
3. ENGINEERING SERVICES
a) Acquiring Private Water Utilities
Hilary read his report on the Regional District’s position on acquiring and operating private water utilities. Consideration is given based on the following:
That the current owners of the system support transferring the utility over to the Regional District.
That area residents are also in general support of the Regional District owning and managing the system.
That an analysis of the water system is completed so the Regional District has a good understanding as to the integrity of the system and the works that are required to bring the utility up to a standard satisfactory to the Regional District.
That the cost to upgrade the system, and a petition to establish the function, is supported by the area residents.
If conflict exists between the utility owner and the water users, the issue should be resolved and dealt with through the provincial ministry overseeing the private utility;
OR
Residents can form their own committee, make an offer to the owner and then petition the Regional District to make a specified area and prepare a borrowing bylaw to purchase the utility. It would then be assessed and a financial plan put together.
The Regional District cannot arbitrarily determine to take over the utility if it is not supported by the current utility owner.
Discussion re. cost. Hilary explained that with the Board’s support, money from the feasibility fund would pay for a consultant’s analysis of the system, to determine how the system could be
upgraded to minimize liability. A formal petition with the established cost would then be prepared. The cost of the study would be repaid to the feasibility fund if the utility was acquired.
KNOWLES/DINWOODIE
THAT the report be received;
AND FURTHER THAT a copy be forwarded to the North Westside Road Rate Payers’ Water Committee.
CARRIED

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page 168
Trepanier Water Management Plan
Chlorination of water containing organic matter may create trihalomethanes (THMs), which have been linked to increased human cancer risk, although THMs have not been a major source of public concern in the TLU to date.

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Description: Joe Rich Groundwater Assessment Study Public Information Meeting July 16, 2008

The Regional District of Central Okanagan is hosting a Public Information Meeting Wednesday, July 16th on a preliminary groundwater assessment for the Joe Rich area.

The session will be held at the Joe Rich Community Hall, 11481 Highway 33 East. Doors open at 6:45 pm with a presentation by representatives from Golder Associates starting at 7:00 pm. Following the presentation, residents will be able to have their questions answered.

In late 2007, Golder Associates was commissioned by the Regional Board to prepare an overview of the aquifers in the Joe Rich area. This report was completed in May and identifies aquifers and provides clear information about groundwater resources in the area. The goal of the meeting is to inform residents about the study, its results and build awareness of the complexities surrounding aquifer sustainability.

Information on the Preliminary Groundwater Assessment study may be viewed on the Regional District website Planning Section Special Projects page, or in person at the Development Services Department (1450 KLO Road).

For more information contact the Development Services Department at 250-469-6227.

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Preliminary Groundwater Assessment for the Joe Rich Area
In late 2007, the Regional Board commissioned Golder and Associates to provide an overview of aquifers in the Joe Rich area. The intention was to identify and provide some clear information about groundwater resources in the area as well as support a better understanding of groundwater aquifers. The report 'Preliminary Assessment of Sustainable Groundwater Development Potential in the Joe Rich Area' was completed in May 2008. You may also view this report by visiting the Development Services Planning Section on the 2nd floor at the Regional District of Central Okanagan office, 1450 KLO Road, Kelowna.

A Public Information Meeting will be held Wednesday, July 16th at the Joe Rich Community Hall, 11481 Highway 33 East to present and answer questions about the Preliminary Assessment report. Doors open at 6:45 pm with a presentation from Golder and Associates starting at 7:00 pm. This will be followed by a question and answer session on the report.

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting – January 28, 2008
Basin Water Board Grant Applications
The Regional Board has approved submitting nine funding applications to the Okanagan Basin Water Board for proposed water-related projects and initiatives during 2008. Four of the applications relate to projects that the Regional District would like to conduct including a request for $30,000 in funding for the Universal Water Metering Program within the Westside District Municipality and Central Okanagan West Electoral Area and a $30,000 grant for Sensitive Habitat Inventory Mapping in partnership with the City of Kelowna. The Regional Board also endorsed five applications for funding totalling $154,400 from other organizations and Irrigation Districts throughout the Central Okanagan. Based on the region’s population, the Water Board may provide approximately $176,000 for 2008 initiatives under its Water Conservation and Quality Improvement Grant Program.

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Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes – December 10, 2007 (Pg. 7-8)
#482/07 GIVEN/BAKER
THAT the Regional Board of the Regional District of Central Okanagan appoint the following directors to the Okanagan Basin Water Board for 2008 effective December 10, 2007: Robert Hobson, Patty Hanson, Graham Reid;
AND FURTHER THAT the following directors be appointed as alternates: Colin Day (1st alternate); James Baker (2nd alternate) and Doug Findlater (3rd alternate).
CARRIED

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Highlights of the Special Regional Board Meeting – November 29, 2007
Water Board Grant Application Supported
The Regional Board supports submitting a funding request to the Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB). The Regional District application is for a $30,000 grant from OBWB Water Conservation and Quality Improvement Program. The funding will assist with the first phase installation of water meters on all domestic and commercial connections in the West Kelowna water system. The Regional District is a member of the Westside Joint Water Committee which has undertaken a universal water meter
installation initiative on the Westside. It’s estimated the cost of installing approximately 2,500 water meters on all Regional District water systems is $920,000.

OKLAKEBC.COM Note* $920,000 divided by 2,500 meters = $368.00 each

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Page 2
Engineering Committee Meeting Minutes – November 8, 2007
d) Valley of the Sun / Upper Fintry Water Service
Hilary Hettinga advised that Agua Consulting Inc. had been retained to investigate the feasibility of establishing water service for properties in Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun. The study has been completed and a public meeting was held on November 5th at the Killiney Beach Community Hall with approximately 130 people attending. Engineering staff and Agua Consulting Inc. gave a
presentation, and cost estimates were established at approx. $15,000 - $20,000 per lot. After a question and answer period, a show of hands indicated exceptional community support. Hilary advised that discussions are also underway with La
Casa re. water service and, after further analysis and a public consultation process, a report will be presented to the Board.
KNOWLES/HANSON
THAT Engineering staff continue to investigate the feasibility of providing water to the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun areas.
CARRIED

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Page 2
Engineering Committee Meeting Minutes – November 8, 2007
b) Montebello Project, 4400 Westside Rd. Sewer & Water
Hilary advised that there are new investors of the old Linemayr property and they require sewer and water for the property. Hilary believed the RDCO should be the owner/operator of the sewer and water utilities in order that they are built to RDCO standards. The Committee concurred.
KNOWLES/HANSON
THAT the report be received. CARRIED

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– October 15, 2007
Water Study Grants Approved
The Regional Board has received a letter from the Minister of Community Services approving two grant applications. The Regional District will receive $5,000 to assist with funding a study into potential water servicing options for the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun in the North Westside Road area.
As well, the province has approved $6,500 for a study of the priorities and costs of upgrades needed for the West Kelowna Water System.

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– October 15, 2007
Sunnyside Water Utility Expansion
The Regional Board has adopted a bylaw amending the service area of the Sunnyside Water Utility. The owners of three new developments submitted petitions asking the Regional District to consider expanding the area to include their projects. The proponents of Barona Beach Resort, the Uplands Phase 3 subdivision and the Jaycor strata subdivision are required to pay for the water system servicing to their properties, while contributing for each unit toward the water system replacement reserve fund. The expansion will provide water to almost 200 additional customers.

http://www.regionaldistrict.com/docs/finance/sunnysidebillingletterapr21_06.pdf

Sunnyside
Sunnyside Water System Service Area Amendment Bylaw No. 1232, 2008 - Amends Bylaw No. 1083 - To include the property owners of three new developments: Barona Beach Resort, Jaycor Strata Subdivision and Uplands Phase III, Fee Simple Subdivision.

Water Systems Amending Bylaw No. 1213, 2007 - Amends Bylaw No. 1108 - Adopted July 23, 2007
j) In Section 7.06 Equipment Replacement Reserve Fund delete the words "Deferred Capacity Trust Fund" and replace them with "Equipment Replacement Reserve Fund"
k) In Section 7.06 Equipment Replacement Reserve Fund, delete item c) and replace with:
"c) Sunnyside $4,250.00 (per unit)"

Sunnyside Water System Service Area Amendment Bylaw No. 1118, 2005 - Amends Bylaw No. 1083

Sunnyside Water System Service Area Establishment Bylaw No. 1083, 2004

West Kelowna Estates
West Kelowna Estates Water System Local Service Area Amending Bylaw No. 1190, 2006-Amends Bylaw No. 597

West Kelowna Estates Water System Local Service Area Amending Bylaw No. 1089, 2005

West Kelowna Estates Water System Local Service Area Establishment Bylaw No. 597, 1994- Amended by Bylaw No. 1190

More Water System Bylaws
Water Circulation Local Service Area - Green Bay Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 688, 1996

Water Distribution Local Service Area - Green Bay Establishment Bylaw No. 687, 1996

Water Systems Amending Bylaw No. 1213, 2007 - Amends Bylaw No. 1108

Water Systems Amending Bylaw No. 1166, 2006 - Amends Bylaw No. 1108

Water Systems Amending Bylaw No. 1142, 2005 - Amends Bylaw No. 1108

Water Systems Amending Bylaw No. 1121, 2005 - Amends Bylaw No. 1108

Water Systems Amending Bylaw No. 1119, 2005 - Amends Bylaw No. 1108

Water Systems Bylaw No. 1108, 2005 - Repeals Bylaw Nos. 614 and 664, Amended by Bylaw Nos. 1119, 1121, 1142, 1166

Water Systems Regulation and Management Amendment Bylaw No. 1054, 2004 - Amends Bylaw No. 614

Water Systems Regulation and Management Bylaw No. 614, 1994 - Repeals & Replaces Bylaw No. 437 & 252 - Repealed by Bylaw No. 1108

Water Utility and Maintenance Fee Amendment Bylaw No 843, 1999 - Amends Bylaw No. 734 - Amended By Bylaw No. 999

Water Utility User And Maintenance Fee Amending Bylaw No. 734, 1997 - Amends Bylaw No 664 & 709 Amended By 843, Amended By Bylaw No. 989

Water Utility User and Maintenance Fee Amending Bylaw No. 709, 1997 - Amended Bylaw No. 664 & Amended By Nos. 734 & 989

Water Utility and Maintenance Fee Amendment Bylaw No. 989, 2002 - Amends Bylaws No. 664, 709, 734, 843

Water Utility and Maintenance Fee Amendment Bylaw No. 1003, 2003 - Amends Bylaw No. 664

Water Utility and Maintenance Fee Amendment Bylaw No. 1062, 2004 - Amends Bylaw No. 664

Water Utility User and Maintenance Fee Bylaw No. 664, 1996 - Repeals & Replaces No. 615, Amended By No. 709, 734, 843, 989, 1003, & 1062 - Repealed by Bylaw No. 1108

Water Utility User Rates Bylaw No. 615, 1994 - Repeals Bylaw Nos. 250, 350, 362, 438, 447 & 498 - Repealed By Bylaw No. 664

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Page 4
Engineering Committee Meeting Minutes – September 6, 2007
c) Valley of the Sun / Upper Fintry Water Service
Hilary Hettinga advised that an analysis was completed by Agua Consulting Inc. into the feasibility of providing domestic water and fire flows to Upper Fintry, Valley of the Sun, and the Kubas development property. (Lower Fintry and the Fintry Provincial Park are not included). Cost estimates were established at
approx. $20,000 per lot. There are 600 – 800 lots, most of which are vacant and thus it is unlikely that grants could be obtained. Representatives of the areas were petitioned informally re. the estimated cost and they appeared optimistic. Staff will
meet with the community to discuss further later in September.
BAKER/GIVEN
THAT the report be received. CARRIED

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Regional District of Central Okanagan Board Agenda July 7, 2007
Regional Board Report July 4, 2007
Bylaw Amendment to the Regional District of Central Okanagan Water Systems Bylaw No. 1108, 2006

Re: Utility Corridors, Water Meter Fees, Turn Water On and Off Fees, Hydrant Use Permit, Pressure Reducing Valve.

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Minutes of the Engineering Committee Meeting of the Regional District of Central Okanagan June 28, 2007

4. OTHER BUSINESS
- Majority of capital (sewer/road) projects are on hold for the new municipality.
- Pineridge Road sewer may possibly proceed under the Lakeview and Glenrosa Sewer Strategy, as residents are experiencing problems. The petition was completed at $7700, and discussion took place re. keeping the cost at $7,700. A parcel tax was suggested. Grants are for high priority areas.
- No response has been received re. infrastructure grants.

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Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes – March 26, 2007 (Pg. 13-14)
9.3 Upper Fintry, Valley of the Sun, Fintry Delta – Community Water System (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)
Engineering Services report dated March 21, 2007 outlined the community water system needs for upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun.
Director Given left the meeting at 9:30 p.m.
#137/07 KNOWLES/DINWOODIE
THAT the Regional Board authorizes the Engineering Department to retain a consultant to conduct a study on the feasibility of providing water to the Upper Fintry, Valley of the Sun, and Fintry Delta subdivisions;
AND FURTHER THAT a public consultation process be developed to work with area residents to determine preferred options and the level of support for the establishment of a community water system;
AND FURTHER THAT the Engineering Department apply for grants to offset some or all of the cost of the study;
AND FURTHER THAT the cost of this study, estimated to be $10,000, be paid for out of feasibility funds.
CARRIED

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Minutes of the Engineering Committee Meeting of the Regional District of Central Okanagan March 20, 2007 (page 2)

a) Upper Fintry & Valley of the Sun Water
Don Darling advised that residents of the Upper Fintry and the Valley of the Sun subdivisions have been inquiring as to the feasibility of the Regional District providing community water to their subdivisions. The Engineering Department feels the overall area, including the Fintry Delta which already has a private water utility, should be included in a feasibility study.
• There are 3 available water sources: Okanagan Lake; Short’s Creek and wells.
• Preliminary cost estimate for the provision of water by RDCO to the Upper Fintry subdivision is $20,000 to $25,000 per parcel.
• Cost of providing water would be more than offset by the increase in the value of their property.
KNOWLES/HANSEN
THAT the Regional Board authorizes the Engineering Department to retain a consultant to conduct a study on the feasibility of providing water to the Upper Fintry, Valley of the Sun, and Fintry Delta subdivisions;
AND FURTHER THAT a public consultation process be developed to work with area residents to determine preferred options and the level of support for the establishment of a community water system;
AND FURTHER THAT the Engineering Department apply for grants to offset some or all of the cost of the study;
AND FURTHER THAT the cost of this study, estimated to be $10,000, be paid for out of feasibility funds.
CARRIED

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– June 26, 2006
Beach Water Quality
The Regional Board has received a presentation on a new Interior Health beach water quality monitoring and public notification program. On occasions when swimming at certain Regional District beaches may pose a health risk from increased levels of bacterial micro-organisms to a small segment of the population, advisory signs will be posted. The program is based on Canadian Guidelines for Recreational Water Quality and is in practice in other jurisdictions across the country.

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– June 26, 2006
Strata Dock Referral Application
The Regional Board has given conditional support to an Integrated Land Management Bureau (ILMB) strata moorage referral application. The applicant proposes a 20-berth dock structure at the Cottages at Secret Point development off Westside Road. The Board support is subject to the applicant meeting a number of environmental conditions and practises to reduce the risk posed by the structure to a known shoreline Kokanee salmon spawning area. Regional District staff has been asked to report back to the Board in one year on the implementation and findings of the environmental mitigation measures and a proposed study on the impact of dock structures on fish spawning.

Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– June 12, 2006
Strata Dock Referral Application
The Regional Board has deferred a decision whether to support an Integrated Land Management Bureau (ILMB) strata moorage referral application. The Board is concerned that the proposed 20 berth dock structure at the Cottages at Secret Point development could pose a high risk to a known Kokanee salmon spawning area. The Board has asked staff to work with the applicant and a professional biologist hired by the applicant to provide a plan that reduces the environmental risk to the fish spawning ground.

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Highlights of the Regional Board Meeting– June 12, 2006
Water Meter Grant Application Supported
The Regional Board supports an application from the District of Peachland to the Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB). The municipality is asking the OBWB for a $30,000 grant that will be used to supply and install water meters, as well as conduct a public education and water conservation program in Peachland.

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Governance and Services Committee Meeting – February 25, 2005 (Pg.4)
- Effluent/Water Disposal - $80,000 deficit from 2004 due to reduced revenues from tipping fees. Volumes dropped as one hauler is going elsewhere.
ACTION: H. Hettinga to review restriction on haulers taking effluent out of the area.
Finance to add effluent/water disposal fees to tax requisition comparison page for Westside South and Westside North.

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2005 STRATEGIC WATER SERVICING PLAN

(Page 26)
GEID (Glenmore-Ellison Improvement District) purchased the assets of the McKinley Landing water utility and are now running the water utility.
Water quality is currently being monitored at the two potential intake sites. Thermistor chains have been installed and initial readings show that warm water currents from the surface reach depths of up to 30 metres. It is expected that the new intake will be installed to a minimum depth of 40 metres.
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(page 27)
The water districts of Black Mountain Irrigation District (BMID), South East Kelowna Irrigation District (SEKID) and Glenmore-Ellison Improvement District (GEID) rely heavily on the upper watersheds for the majority of their source water supply. A description of the watersheds where their water supplies originate is provided in this section.
BMIDWATERSHEDS
BMID obtains water from two watersheds: Mission Creek and Scotty Creek. The primary source of water is Mission Creek, which also supplies approximately 30% of the total inflow to Okanagan Lake.
Mission Creek
The Mission Creek watershed area above the BMID intake is estimated to be 561 km2. The watershed is unique to the Okanagan as it contains the Graystoke area which has substantial land area with elevations over 5,000 feet. This area produces a significant annual volume of runoff and is now a designated Provincial Park. 2002 Mission Creek Freshet at BMID WTP Intake BMID operates four storage reservoirs in the Mission Creek watershed to capture snowmelt runoff in the spring. Upper level reservoirs are Fish Hawk Reservoir (1,850 ML), Graystoke Lake Reservoir (4,550 ML), and Ideal Lake (6,780 ML). Loch Long (710 ML) is also operated by BMID. The storage license on Loch Long is held by the Province for the enhancement of fish flows in Mission Creek during the late summer and early fall season each year. After spring runoff subsides, water is released from the reservoirs to Mission Creek and is captured at a lower elevation intake where it is diverted through the water treatment plant, balancing reservoirs, and to the water distribution system.
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On June 30th, 2004, the Province of BC released new Groundwater Protection Regulations. They are posted on the web at: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/wsd/plan_protect_sustain/groundwater/
The regulations set out the requirements for qualified and registered well drillers and well pump installers in the Province. The regulation also sets out requirements for groundwater protection, including surface sealing of well heads, well identification procedures, deactivation and closing of wells, well caps and well covers, floodproofing of wells and protection of the wellhead.
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(page 59
The Rutland system can meet the domestic and fire flow requirements of all users with only a few exceptions. The system is well interconnected and supplied by multiple sources, and is therefore very reliable. Water quality in most of the wells is good, but water from some wells in the north part of the District is high in hardness, manganese and iron. The poorer quality wells are only used when water demand is high.
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(page 91)
There is over $120,000,000 in capital expenditures planned for the KJWC utilities in the next 20 years.
Of the total expenditures planned, water treatment forms approximately half of the total expenditure.
Major treatment and water quality improvement projects are planned for BMID, GEID and SEKID;
- As water treatment forms a significant portion of the overall water improvement projects, the water utilities must plan how to move forward on these financial issues. Water quality and renewal
initiatives will have the largest impact on utility rates in the next 20 years.

http://www.sekid.ca/pdf/reports/KJWC 2005 Water Servicing Plan.pdf

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If you are hauling your own water, you can try speaking with Wayne Watson about getting your water supply through Wayne's Estamont Beach water system ($220.00 per year or thereabouts).  Wayne has the most reasonable priced water system around and he may be interested in setting up a withdraw system if enough people are interested.  This is not confirmed but we suggest that if you are interested you should phone Wayne at 250-542-3501 and discuss it with him as he is most likely open to suggestions.  One local from Valley of the Sun is now paying Wayne Watson to get water from one of the Estamont Beach properties.  She is a friend of one of the Estamont Beach property owners and she helps the property owner in exchange for allowing her to get water there (enough water just for one home with one person living in the home).

*Note* One person from Upper Fintry said that Wayne is not permitted any more water users on his system.  If this is true, you may want to try asking Westshore Estates or Killiney Beach water systems run by RDCO.  In the past Lower Fintry has said he is not set up for selling water, plus Lower Fintry water system is the most expensive in the area.

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UPDATE June 5, 2008

We are waiting for the consultant to identify potential well sites. Once we have identified potential locations and gained the necessary approvals for these locations we will complete test wells to confirm quality and quantity of the available ground water. We will then be in a position to provide more accurate cost estimates to develop a community water system and move towards public consultation and support for this capital project.

H. Hettinga - RDCO Director of Engineering

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From Westside Road Communities News Jun 2008 Volume 4 ~ Issue 1 (page 2)

Water for Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun

The studies that were ordered have not been completed.  it is hopeful water is coming.  Additional information is available on the Regional District website: www.cord.bc.ca

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Water System Fees for 2008 - Bylaw #1108 Consolidated

Sunset Ranch water system fees at $236.40 is the least expensive while Trepainier (Dietrich) water system is the most expensive at $1050.64.

West Kelowna
User Fee $283.68
Maintenance Fee $64.60
Total = $348.28

Sunnyside
Flat Rate $65.00 per quarter = $260.00 year
Unimproved Parcels $168.00 per parcel

Falcon Ridge
User Fee $420.48
Maintenance Fee to be determined upon expiration of parcel tax
Total = $420.48

Trepainier (Dietrich)
User Fee $1050.64
Maintenance Fee $00.00
Total $1050.64

Killiney Beach
User Fee $215.36
Maintenance Fee $120.00
Total = $335.36

Westshore Estates
User Fee $215.36
Maintenance Fee $130.00
Total = $345.36

Sunset Ranch
User Fee $236.40
Parcels greater than 0.25 Ha $1,800.00
Total = $236.40


Pritchard Water System
User Fee $210.12
Maintenance Fee $80.00
Total = $290.12

(page 14 - 22)

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North Westside Water Study (page 3 Fall 2007 Water Talk)
Property owners in two subdivisions along North Westside Road attended a public meeting earlier this month at the Killiney Beach Community Hall. They’re considering whether the Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) should proceed with further studies into the options available for a community water service in the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun areas. The province approved the creation of hundreds of lots in these areas prior to the formation of the RDCO in 1967, even though there was no provision for any in-house water service.  Earlier this year, some property owners in the two areas approached the RDCO, asking it to look into the feasibility and options for establishing a water distribution system. Agua Consulting Limited was contracted to do an initial study (the results were presented last month), and it suggests that developing such a system to service households could cost between $15,000 and $25,000 per lot. Before any final decision is made whether to proceed with the project, residents’ support would be required through a formal petition process.
For more information, visit the Regional District Engineering Services

Water Grants Approved
The RDCO has received funding from the Canada/BC Infrastructure Planning Grant Program to help plan two water-related projects.

• $6,500 for a study of priorities and cost estimates of a capital plan for the West Kelowna Water System. This project will focus on the requirements for water intake supply, the pump house, water treatment, and upgrades required throughout the system.

$5,000 for the recently completed study into the feasibility, options, and estimated costs of providing a community water supply and distribution system for the Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun areas of North Westside Road.

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5.2.4 Standards, Guidelines and Regulations Affecting Ground Water Quality in British Columbia
There is no federal or provincial legislation directly related to the prevention of ground water contamination. There are, however, government acts and programs at both levels that provide standards, guidelines and regulations that have an indirect bearing on ground water quality. They can be classified into three groups: (1) drinking water quality standards, (2) federal statutes, and (3) provincial statutes.

The British Columbia Drinking Water Quality Standards (B.C. Ministry of Health, 1982) grew out of a federal-provincial task force that updated the 1978 Canadian drinking water guidelines. Although they are called standards, they are actually guidelines in that they are not legally enforceable. Two types of recommended limits are specified: (1) Maximum Acceptable Concentration, and (2) Objective Concentration.

gov.bc.ca/wsd/plan_protect_sustain/groundwater/gwbc/C05_contamination.html

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Westshore Estates 2009 projected budget for metering = $99,500

Westshore Estates 2009 projected budget for reservoir = $370,000

Westshore Estates on page 45

Killiney Beach 2009 budget for metering = $131,000

Killiney Beach 2009 budget for reservoir = $300,000

Killiney Beach on page 39

 

http://www.westsidewatermeter.ca/ (website no longer works)

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Water board issues grants
article from the Vernon Morning Star April 6, 2008
Water board issues grants article from the Vernon Morning Star April 6, 2008
Lots of water grants in this article.

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May 20, 2008
Grants Increased to Small Communities

OKANAGAN – Peachland and Summerland are benefiting from $755,003 in provincial funding, announced Okanagan-Westside MLA Rick Thorpe.

“Increasing our support to our growing Okanagan communities’ ability to successfully provide services is important,” said Thorpe. “I am proud of our governments’ commitment to continue to increase funding to help Summerland and Peachland meet their operating costs.”

These grants will be distributed to these communities as follows in 2008:
• Peachland will receive $429,694
• Summerland will receive $325,309

Small Community Grants assist small and medium-sized area municipalities to fund local and basic services. The grant allocation is based on a formula with three elements: basic funding for all municipalities with a population of less than 15,000, population-based funding, and property assessment-based funding.

The Small Community and Regional District Grants are part of a series of programs available to local governments to help provide services and infrastructure. This includes annual Traffic Fine Revenue Sharing, LocalMotion, Towns for Tomorrow and B.C. Spirit Squares funding, as well as the Green City Awards.

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Infrastructure grants denied for Enderby
By Richard Rolke - Vernon Morning Star - May 07, 2008

The City of Enderby has lost out on major grants for infrastructure improvements.

Council was notified Monday that requests for water and sewer treatment projects were turned down by the federal and provincial governments.

“I guess they can’t give all of their money to the city and they have to spread it around,” said Mayor Sue Phillips of the fact that Enderby has received grants before.

The total price tag for the sewer improvements is $1.4 million, and it was hoped the provincial and federal governments would pick up two-thirds of the costs.

Work on the water treatment plant would have also been about $1.4 million.

Council was told Monday that the Canada/B.C. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund received more applications than money exists.

“This decision does not reflect on the importance of these projects but rather the degree by which the program has been oversubscribed,” states a letter from the federal and provincial governments.

Both the sewer and water projects are designed to meet the city’s future needs, and they will be postponed because of the lack of senior government funding.

“It’s not critical right now but with new subdivisions going in, it’s something we will have to look at,” said Phillips of the projects.

“To accommodate growth, we need the infrastructure.”

However, Enderby has a largely residential tax base and it’s difficult for the community to pay for major capital works on its own.

“We are dependent on funding grants,” said Phillips.

“There are granting opportunities all of the time, so we will just keep at it (applying).”

While there is no help for sewer and water, the city will receive federal/provincial assistance for road upgrades in the Cliff View Street.

Of the $1.8 million price tag, the senior governments are providing $1.2 million for the project

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snippets:

3. ENGINEERING SERVICES Minutes of February 6, 2003 page 4-5
a) Acquiring Private Water Utilities

Hilary read his report on the Regional District’s position on acquiring and operating private water utilities. Consideration is given based on the following:

  • That the current owners of the system support transferring the utility over to the Regional District.

  • That area residents are also in general support of the Regional District owning and managing the system.

THAT the report be received;
AND FURTHER THAT a copy be forwarded to the North Westside Road Rate Payers’ Water Committee.

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Water worries in the Okanagan Valley article March 2008
click article to read larger print
article from the Vernon Morning Star March 19, 2008

There could be water wars in the Okanagan Basin by 2050.  Licences for both use of groundwater and surface water should be restricted, and more enforceable tools are needed.  He suggested a plan to formulate a plan to buy back water licences, and he wondered whether upstream licences take into account the consequences they will have on downstream resources.

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IHA to continue, then revamp, advisory system
April 30, 2008 - Vernon Morning Star

The controversial system of issuing public water quality and boil water advisories as the turbidity in local water systems increases will continue this year, but will be revised for next year, according to the Interior Health Authority.

Senior medical health officer Dr. Andrew Larder was responding to a 69-page report just released by the provincial health minister, prepared by a group of international water experts, that reviewed the whole issue of risk assessment and water quality, and how best to inform the public about changing water quality.

They reported back to the minister Feb. 28, recommending that utilities and provincial government staff work together to come up with a better system of informing the public about water quality issues.

Larder said there will be provincial level discussions now about the effectiveness of the advisories.

However, they’re only one of a multi-barrier approach to water quality safety, he noted.

He believes such advisories, focused on turbidity levels, are based on risk factors of water systems, so he feels turbidity is a reasonable way to approach advisories.

But, he said, the report has provided new information and there will be “new best practices,” as a result of it.

The report did state that a water quality index, based on many water quality parameters, would be impossible to create. That index was recommended by the Water Supply Association of B.C.

Vice-chairman Toby Pike was pleased with the technical advisory committee’s report, and said he hopes the health minister will follow through with its recommendations.

Pike noted that the report did question Interior Health’s decision to mandate filtration of surface water systems as essential to make drinking water safe enough. Instead, he says the report states there are acceptable alternatives.

“Common sense is needed,” he commented, adding he looks forward to getting together with provincial officials to try and work out a better system.

The association has been adamant that the measure of turbidity (cloudiness) to indicate public health risk posed by water is not a good indicator.

“There are all kinds of instances of waterborne disease outbreaks without turbidity,” he said.

Chronic water quality advisories aren’t effective at modifying public behaviour, he said, because people get “message fatigue,” and ignore them.

Right now, he said the water utilities simply look at a turbidity meter and issue an advisory.

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Greater Vernon water rates climb
By Richard Rolke - Vernon Morning Star - April 20, 2008

“The guy who uses a big amount of water pays the same as the guy who keeps his water down to a minimum.”

— Cliff Kanester

Greater Vernon residents will be paying more every time they turn on the tap.

The Greater Vernon Services Committee approved changes to the water rates bylaw Thursday, including a 5.5 per cent increase for residential, industrial, commercial and institutional customers.

“They are a hell of an increase,” said Stan Field, BX-Silver Star director.

Of the 5.5 per cent, three per cent is to pay for projects related to the master water plan, while the remaining 2.5 per cent represents general and construction inflation.

The only board member to oppose the new rates was Cliff Kanester, BX-Swan Lake director.

Kanester insists that the billing structure does nothing to encourage water conservation.

“The guy who uses a big amount of water pays the same as the guy who keeps his water down to a minimum,” he said.

Agricultural rates have been increased at the B.C. rate of inflation of 1.8 per cent.

Staff recommended that the directors support the rate hikes Thursday.

“If the bylaw is not passed, the existing rates and fees will continue to be charged,” said Al Cotsworth, utility manager, in a memo.

“This will reduce the utility’s income and rate increases will have to be deferred to a future year, or capital projects will become further delayed.”

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Article from North Westside Communities Newsletter regarding water for Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun.  Found in the Spring 2008 edition
$15,000 per household for water North Westside Communities News article says.  This article was not published on the NWCA website as of April 9, 2008.

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Study benefits water supply
By Tyler Olsen - Vernon Morning Star - March 23, 2008

A key North Okanagan watershed will be the subject of a scientific study focusing on its long-term sustainability.

A team of professors and graduate students will examine the intricacies of the water supply collected by the Deep Creek watershed, which runs the length of the Township of Spallumcheen.

The team of scientists has been given $199,000 by the National Science and Engineering Research Council for the study, which will track surface and ground water in the watershed.

The results will be used to determine the effects of a host of variables, from development to climate change, on water supply. And the outcome should prove useful to not only Spallumcheen and Armstrong, but communities around the valley where such extensive studies have not been undertaken.

“I think it will be very useful,” said UBCO professor Adam Wei, one of the team leaders. “I think local communities definitely need that kind of information.”

The first step in the study will be to collect as much data as possible, said Wei.

“Once we collect data, we can calibrate it and test different scenarios,” he said. “The data definitely will be very useful for local community watersheds.”

That view is shared by Mayor Will Hansma.

“It will give us a good (idea) of water consumption and the level of recharge,” he said. “This will give us a real good idea for what we can expect that we can accommodate for growth.”

The study will examine how commodity prices, water prices and water use rules affect the demand for water. It will also test how demand and climate change will affect the sustainability of the precious resource. And the results will provide important data for governing bodies like the Okanagan Basin Water Board.

The study will begin in April and graduate students are currently being recruited. One post-doctoral fellow and three master students will be hired to work on the project.

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Okanagan Basin water supply could dwindle
By Judie Steeves - Kelowna Capital News - March 16, 2008

There could be water wars in the Okanagan Basin by 2050.

Predictions based on modeling suggest Okanagan Lake won’t fill by 2050, resulting in less water being released downstream; a 44 per cent drop in sockeye egg-to-smolt survival in the Okanagan River; and legal challenges from other water users.

The scenario is the result of work done by scientists such as Kim Hyatt, from the federal department of fisheries and oceans, and it was unveiled for members of the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council at Thursday’s meeting by systems ecologist Clint Alexander, of ESSA Technologies Ltd.

He gave a presentation on the implications of climate change to the cross-border Okanagan Basin, based on computer modeling.

Within 40 years shore spawning Okanagan Lake kokanee will be endangered by low water levels where egg-laying is less suitable; some water intakes may no longer suck up water because lake and river levels will be too low; and recreational navigation will be endangered by new hazards.

Runoff from melting snow will peak earlier, resulting in more demands for water that’s in shorter supply and there’ll be a 40 per cent reduction in total net inflow to Okanagan Lake.

However, he told council members there is hope.

He recommended we be proactive instead of reactive in dealing with the upcoming challenges. We should also get an honest estimate of surplus water that’s available for future growth.

Water management throughout the basin should be unified—a recommendation that was also contained in a 1974 report on the basin.

Money should be saved for education and outreach, to ensure better water conservation is practiced.

Based on a scientific water budget for the basin, regulations and standards should be set for water extraction.

Water managers must ask developers how water will be provided for their development, and they must then take into account the downstream impact of their decisions.

Alexander also proposed the establishment of ecological water banks or reserves.

More potent regulations and monitoring of water should be undertaken. “Voluntarism is an anemic response to the problem,” he commented.

Licences for both use of groundwater and surface water should be restricted, and more enforceable tools are needed.

He suggested a plan be formulated to buy back water licences, and he wondered whether upstream licences take into account the consequences they will have on downstream resources.

Real-time technology is needed to measure exactly what’s going on in the basin, he said. More habitat refuges or parks will be needed, and he suggested taking advantage of the money available from large conservancies and trusts.

Effective partnerships should be encouraged and coordination and cooperation should be strengthened.

There should be less talk and more action. “Somebody needs to implement ideas, not just talk about them,” he concluded.

Council member Grant Maddock, of the Urban Development Institute, agreed it’s important that if we don’t have water for the long-term, Official Community Plans must identify that.

Alexander responded that we can’t stop people from coming into the valley, but we can design how development occurs, while we learn about other adaptations.

Bernie Bauer, Dean of the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences at UBCO and a council member, said we need to make some basic changes to our lifestyles; to live more sustainably.

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The word "New" in red okanaganlakebc.ca recommends a bidet type toilet in your washroom for urinating.  Bidets take way less water than a regular toilet.  Just think of how many times you flush the toilet everyday when you urinate and how much water that uses.  How many people live in your house?

okanaganlakebc.ca recommends that bylaws be put in place by the Cities or Provinces to have bidets installed in new homes being constructed or the newest water saver toilets.  Trying to fit a bidet into a small bathroom is almost impossible later, so why not start now?  A bidet type toilet would be a huge water saver.  1 person can live on 6,000 gallons of water per year as  okanaganlakebc.ca does.  okanaganlakebc.ca uses 5 gallons of water per bath.  When you haul your water you find ways to conserve.

Squat Toilet more squat pans

OkanaganLakeBC calls this toilet the cats meow but wait here's a prettier one.

Designer Toilet - Algiers designer toilet - Nice set (a must see)

2.3 L. water saver toilet

1.6 and .8 gallons per flush (dual flush) toilet (Caroma)

Sydney Smart (Caroma) has a small flush of 0.8 gallons per flush (gpf) and an optional larger flush of 1.28 gpf. With the built-in lower flush option, typically used four times more often than the larger flush, Sydney Smart provides the highest water savings of any high efficiency toilet. In Ottawa they are giving out $60 and $75 rebates.

Small Toilet and Bidet all in one that fits on the wall

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Canada Mortgage and Housing tid bits

Toilets account for approximately 30 per cent of total residential indoor water use

The 1996 Ontario Building Code requires the installation of 6-litre toilets in new construction vs. earlier 13-litre toilets and even older 20+ litre toilets. The City of Vancouver has also mandated 6-litre toilets, however they are not required for the rest of the province. Although the use of 6-litre toilets is mandated across the entire United States and considered standard technology in most parts of Europe, Ontario is currently the only Canadian province with this requirement. Many municipalities across Canada have subsidized toilet replacement programs in an attempt to increase the market penetration of water efficient toilets and reduce overall water consumption. Promoting or mandating 6-litre toilets, often called ultra-low-flush or ULF toilets, is often a key component in conservation programs since toilets account for approximately 30 per cent of total residential indoor water use.

The dual-flush toilet, a technology first developed in the early 1980s, takes water-efficiency one step further by using 6 litres of water to flush solid waste but only 3 litres to flush liquid waste. While this technology is mandated in Australia and Singapore it is relatively new in North America.

There were several comments about bowl streaking.

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Snowpack highest in a decade
By Richard Rolke - Vernon Morning Star - April 06, 2008

Steady snowfall in the hills should provide enough water for Greater Vernon residents this summer.

At the end of March, snowpack readings on the Aberdeen plateau were 12 per cent above average.

“It’s the highest snowpack we’ve had in the last 10 years,” said Al Cotsworth, water utility manager for the Greater Vernon Services Committee.

As a result, Cotsworth isn’t forecasting a shortage of water this summer.

“It’s unlikely we will go to additional water restrictions. We will likely just keep with the odd-even restrictions,” he said.

Year-round restrictions require odd-numbered addresses to water on odd-numbered days, and even-numbered addresses to irrigate on even-numbered days.

But while conditions look good, a dry spring and summer could still place pressure on the utility.

“No matter what happens, people should follow the odd-even restrictions and think about how they are using water,” said Cotsworth.

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2008 INITIATIVES (BY RDCO FOR RDCO)
Complete feasibility study and begin design in order to provide water service to Upper Fintry and Valley of the Sun subdivisions in North Westside Road area.

Source RDCO 2007 Annual Report pg 8

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Nov 29, 2007

The Regional District operates eight water utilities and intends to implement a universal water metering program which is consistent with an initiative by the Westside Joint Water Committee. The cost of the program is estimated to be $920,000. $30,000 in funding assistance is being requested from the OBWB.
CARRIED

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Regional Board Report Feb 19, 2008

The Regional District also anticipates installation of water meters for its remaining water utilities in 2009, if funds are available and community support is received. The total cost for the 2600 meters in the Regional District's utilities is estimated to be $1,000,000.00

($1,000,000 divided by 2600 meters = $384.62 each meter)

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CITY OF KELOWNA STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT 2003

Typical Residential Water Use (from page 34)

  • Kitchen/ Drinking 10%

  • Laundry 20%

  • Cleaning, 5%

  • Showers & Baths 35%

The top five environmental concerns identified by Kelowna residents in the October 1998 telephone survey were: (from page 107)

1. Air Quality
2. Drinking Water Quality
3. Waste Disposal
4. Loss of Natural Space
5. Water Supply

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Design Guidelines for Rural Residential Community Water Systems

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RDCO is looking at hooking up Valley of the Sun and Upper Fintry to LaCasa's water system.

RDCO website links re: LaCasa

Clipart - New www.regionaldistrict.com/docs/engineering/nwwater/lacasastudy_jan08.pdf
- Based on initial cost estimates, the total cost per single family lot will be in the range $14,000 (pg 13)
-
Fire flow (FF) 30.3 L/s (rural) for 2.0 hrs or 60 L/s for 1.0 hr (pg 4)
- Fire flow (FF) 30.3 L/s (LaCasa)
Min. 75 L/s for 1.67 hr for SF
Min. 150 L/s for 2.0 hr for MF (pg 6)
- Note: Fire flows and storage will not be adequate to fight a major forest fire. (pg 6)

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Water woes flood communities
Vernon Morning Star article Feb 24, 2008
Water soes flood communties article from the Vernon Morning Star Feb 24, 2008
click article to read larger print
Hansma, meanwhile, said that if the city cannot transport water the township feels it owns it should look to expand its water capacity.

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Clipart - New Hole is being bored under Westside Road for a water pipe up from Okanagan Lake.  See pictures.

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Clipart - New Towns for Tomorrow Water Grant Circular

To be considered for the next round of approvals, all Application Forms, Project Update Forms and supporting documentation must be received at the Ministry by March 15, 2008. The next round of successful projects will be announced in summer 2008.

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Clipart - New  December 20, 2007 we received a reply to an email we sent Dec 19, 2007 to Blair Lekstrom Premier’s Parliamentary Secretary for Rural Development who oversees the Towns for Tomorrow grant program.  He says he has discussed this issue (that we may have no grant to help pay for a water system) with the Ministry responsible and they will respond directly.  He says have a Merry Christmas.

Feb 1, 2008 we haven't heard anything yet.

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IF YOU WANT WATER GRANT FUNDING, PLEASE DON"T RELY ON RDCO OR OUR NEW DIRECTOR TO WORK FOR YOU AS HARD AS YOU CAN YOURSELF.  PLEASE HELP TO TAKE CARE OF THIS OURSELVES OR WE MAY LOOSE OUT, WHICH WILL IN TURN HELP ALL OF US.  IF YOU WANT FUNDING THIS IS PROBABLY WHERE WE NEED TO START.

PLEASE CONTACT

Community Services Minister Ida Chong, and

Blair Lekstrom Premier’s Parliamentary Secretary for Rural Development who oversees the Towns for Tomorrow grant program, etc. etc.

If there are approx. 360 lots at Upper Fintry, Shalal Road and Valley of the Sun without Kubas property.  The capital cost for each lot to build a water system was mentioned at $20,360 maximum as stated in Agua's report, the total amount for 360 lots would come to $7,329,600.  If we qualified for up to a maximum of $500,000 worth of funding from Towns for Tomorrow grant program, this would still leave us $6,829,600 in debt between 360 lots which means $18,971 each to pay.  This is still a savings of $1,389 each lot.

http://www.regionaldistrict.com/docs/engineering/NWwater/Upper Fintry - Valley of the Sun.pdf

Ask government (above) why RDCO feel we don't qualify for funding.  Ask government (above) if maybe they can help fund just the full-time and part-time residents who own lots with houses on them if the reason we don't qualify for funding is because of too many vacant lots as RDCO statesTowns for Tomorrow grant program states it may provide up to 80% funding to build a water system for us to have a clean source of drinking water and fire protection.  Mention the mountain pine beetle if you contact them.  Tell them that maybe the reason why our subdivisions are not as developed, is because people don't want to build here without a clean source of drinking water.  They have given out funding to upgrade from boil water advisories which some of us don't even have water for a boil water advisory.  In one instance 16 service connections were paid for with a government grant and that grant is over now but this "Towns for Tomorrow" grant is available now, plus maybe this other "Building Canada" grant.  138 residents of Canal Flats received funding and we have maybe as many residents.  This funding is available now (Towns for Tomorrow).  There are close to 360-492 homes here with Kubas development (stats below).

The application submission deadline for 2008, the second round of Towns for Tomorrow grants, will be March 15, 2008

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Clipart - New Small Communities targeted for green infrastructure
Towns for Tomorrow $7 million supports "Green Infrastructure Projects"
click article dated December 7, 2007 to read larger print
Towns for Tomorrow $7 million supports "Green Infrastructure Projects"

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Nov. 30, 2007 Towns for Tomorrow News Release

VICTORIA – British Columbia’s smallest communities now have access to another $7 million in provincial funding, as the Province opens the application process for the next round of the Towns for Tomorrow program, supporting green infrastructure projects, announced Ida Chong, Minister of Community Services, and Blair Lekstrom, Parliamentary Secretary for Rural Development.

“I’m pleased that Towns for Tomorrow is directed specifically at communities of 5,000 or less,” said Lekstrom. “We know that this significant financial support contributes to these communities’ ability to make greener, healthier choices for their infrastructure projects.”

“This program is designed to support local governments in creating sustainable, vibrant communities,” said Chong. “This is more important than ever as we work hard to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 33 per cent below current levels by 2020. Local governments of all sizes have a significant role to play in this effort and I’m pleased we can provide funds to help.”

The entire program runs for three years and provides $21 million to assist local governments with populations under 5,000. Under the program’s cost-sharing formula, the Province will provide up to 80 per cent of eligible costs, for projects up to $500,000.

http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2005-2009/2007CS0105-001547.htm

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New Deal Community Works Fund

http://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/181.asp?grantid=30&r=23&r=121&r=16&r=30

Community Works Fund dispersals for water projects paid out of gas tax funds.


About the General Strategic Priorities Fund (GSPF) and Innovations Fund (IF)

The GSPF and IF are two application based funding programs under the
Canada–British Columbia–UBCM Agreement on the Transfer of Federal Gas Tax Revenues (GTA). The GTA delivers federal funding to local governments and other eligible recipients to invest in eligible capacity building/integrated community sustainability planning projects and public transit, community energy, water, wastewater or solid waste infrastructure projects that contribute to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, cleaner water or cleaner air.

The GTA contains three tiers of local government: Tier 3 is Greater Vancouver Regional District and its member municipalities; Tier 2 is Okanagan-Similkameen, Central Okanagan, North Okanagan, Capital, Cowichan Valley, Nanaimo, Fraser Valley and Squamish-Lillooet Regional Districts and their member municipalities; and Tier 1 is the remaining regional districts and their member municipalities. Funding under IF is available to all three tiers. GSPF funding, however, is available only to Tiers 1 and 2, since Tier 3 receives funding under a separate strategic priorities fund.

This is the second intake of applications invited under both the GSPF and IF programs. Funding for capital projects was originally set at $63.9 million under GSPF and $30.2 million for IF, and of this, $40.9 million from GSPF and $13.6 million from IF has been committed to projects from the first round of applications. Available funding for this round of capital project applications is therefore $23.0 million in GSPF and $16.6 million in IF.

Funding amounts (both GSPF and IF)
Successful applicants will be awarded grant funding up to the lesser of 100% of the actual eligible project costs and 100% of the estimated eligible project costs identified in the application. Grants will be approved on the basis of the net costs to the applicant, that is, net of other grants and other external contributions (e.g., governments, non-government organizations, private sector).

If funding for a project is provided under another federal infrastructure program (e.g., Canada/BC Infrastructure Program, Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund), the maximum federal contribution under the other infrastructure program continues to apply, and GSPF or IF funding cannot be used to increase the maximum federal contribution under the other infrastructure program.
page 3

http://www.civicnet.bc.ca/files/{FF03A1F6-7C04-42D6-9500-C3C3E4C49771}Capital GSPF-IF Program Guide.pdf

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December 16, 2007 an email was sent to Minister of Community Services Ida Chong.
http://www.gov.bc.ca/cserv/minister.html

The email to Minister Ida Chong asked why there is infrastructure funding grants for water system upgrades with new UV systems etc and there may not be infrastructure funding grants to help build a water system for Valley of the Sun and Upper Fintry as RDCO states on their website. (Latest News below... keep reading).

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Ministry of Economic Development http://www.gov.bc.ca/ecdev/index.html

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Dec 17, 2007 an email was sent to infra(delete)@gov.bc.ca
cserv.gov.bc.ca/lgd/infra/infrastructure_grants/community_water_improvement.htm

asking what government grants may be available.

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December 19, 2007 we also emailed Blair Lekstrom.

Local governments with populations of 5,000 or less and the Central Coast Regional District can apply to Towns for Tomorrow for grant funding. Under the cost-share program, the Province will provide 80% of the funding for approved projects up to $500,000, with communities funding the remaining 20%. A total of $7 million is available each year.

http://www.townsfortomorrow.gov.bc.ca/

The Towns for Tomorrow program is being overseen by the Premier’s Parliamentary Secretary for Rural Development, Blair Lekstrom (MLA for Peace River South) link below.

Towns for Tomorrow program website points to Blair Lekstrom's website as a contact.  You can find Blair's contact information on his website.

http://www.blairlekstrommla.bc.ca/EN/1066/

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Clipart - New Latest News

3. ENGINEERING SERVICES (on page 4 at link below)
c) Valley of the Sun / Upper Fintry Water Service

Hilary Hettinga advised that an analysis was completed by Agua Consulting Inc. into the feasibility of providing domestic water and fire flows to Upper Fintry, Valley of the Sun, and the Kubas development property. (Lower Fintry and the Fintry Provincial Park are not included).

Cost estimates were established at approx. $20,000 per lot.

There are 600 – 800 lots, most of which are vacant and thus it is unlikely that grants could be obtained.

Representatives of the areas were petitioned informally re. the estimated cost and they appeared optimistic. Staff will meet with the community to discuss further later in September.

BAKER/GIVEN

THAT the report be received. CARRIED

www.regionaldistrict.com/docs/boards_committees/eng/mins/2007/Eng_07_09_06min.pdf

**Note there are 360 lots in total at Valley of the Sun, Muir, and Shalal Road according to the North Westside Fire Rescue maps.  With Kubas property of 133 max. REU's (page 15 Agua's report) would = 493 lots in total and not the 600-800 according to RDCO

Valley of the Sun has approx. 149 lots of which approx. 37 lots are occupied full-time, 2 lots have new foundations, 8 lots have homes with part-time residents.

Upper Fintry/Muirallen has approx. 197 lots of which approx. 17 lots are occupied full-time, and 9 lots have new houses on them, 1 lot has a new foundation, 1 lot just started building, and 4 lots have cabins.

Shalal Road has approx. 14 lots of which 2 lots are occupied full-time.

Source of our statistics (number of lots) is from counting each lot on the maps found on the North Westside Fire Rescue website.

73 of the 360 lots at Valley of the Sun, Muir, and Shalal have homes on them.

---------------------------------------------

UF – Upper Fintry & Shalal Road – 206 REUs
VOS – Valley of the Sun – 153 REUs
K1 – Kubas Development (min) – 50 REUs
K2 – Kubas Development (max) – 133 REUs (200 Multi Family Units)
above statistics are from Agua's report on page 15  ... there is also a map of the proposed water system and this map has a lot map on it.

According to Agua's statistics there is in total including the max 133 REUs Kubas development, a total of 492 lots.

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North Westside Communities website Dec 07 newsletter page 8 (.pdf) states it may cost each property between $15,000 - $25,000 to build a water system.

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Building Canada will support investments in:

Drinking Water

Building Canada promotes long-term funding for water infrastructure projects designed to:

Improve the safety, management, reliability and efficiency of Canada’s drinking water treatment and distribution systems;

Increase the number of households with access to safe drinking water that meets or exceeds the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality;

Improve protection and management of drinking water sources;

Improve conservation of water.
Funding will focus on improved treatment standards that emphasize the protection of human health. In addition, projects will have to be supported by other measures that improve the management of sources of drinking water, reduce demand and improve the management of drinking water infrastructure.

http://www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca/plandocs/bg-di/bg-di-info5-eng.html

http://www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca/funprog-progfin/target-viser/bcf-fcc/bcf-fcc-eng.html

Building Canada promotes long-term funding for water infrastructure projects designed to:

Improve the safety, management, reliability and efficiency of Canada's drinking water treatment and distribution systems;

Increase the number of households with access to safe drinking water that meets or exceeds the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality;

Improve protection and management of drinking water sources;

Improve conservation of water.

http://www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca/plandocs/booklet-livret/booklet-livret08-eng.html#drinkingwater

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Aug. 15, 2007 Canal Flats

A $400,000 grant from the provincial government’s Towns for Tomorrow program will greatly improve drinking water quality for Canal Flats residents.

This funding will allow Canal Flats to create a unified drinking water system and improve water quality for 138 residents and Canal Flats Provincial Park.

Under the program’s cost-sharing formula, the Province will provide up to 80 per cent of eligible costs for projects up to $500,000.

http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2005-2009/2007CS0054-001025.htm

http://www.townsfortomorrow.gov.bc.ca/media/gallery/canal_flats/default.html

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Dec. 17, 2007

Pritchard - The Thompson-Nicola Regional District will receive more than $156,000 from the federal and provincial governments towards sewage treatment plant upgrades in the community of Pritchard.

The funding will enable the Thompson-Nicola Regional District to upgrade Pritchard’s sewage treatment plant, improve wastewater quality and ultimately lift a boil-water advisory from their drinking water system. This project is conditionally approved pending the successful completion of an environmental assessment.

This particular upgrade will lift a boil-water advisory and improve the water quality for more than 390 people

http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2005-2009/2007CS0114-001627.htm

The application process for accessing funding under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund began on October 12, 2006 and ended January 31, 2007. Applications for funding under the CBCMRIF are no longer accepted.

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Government funding.

The application submission deadline for 2008, the second round of Towns for Tomorrow, will be March 15, 2008.

Towns for Tomorrow will provide $21 million, over four years, for projects in B.C.’s communities with populations under 5,000. With the funding, communities may choose to make water quality improvements, develop recreation and cultural amenities, undertake environmental energy improvements, or invest in protective and emergency services infrastructure and community development.

Source http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2007/stplan/default.aspx?hash=4

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BOSTON BAR – The Government of Canada and the Province of B.C. are providing more than $1.3 million to improve drinking water quality in Boston Bar and eliminate a long-term boil water advisory.
Today’s investment will greatly benefit Boston Bar residents by providing safe drinking water for approximately 500 people and by enabling the community to remove a long-standing boil water advisory,....

http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2005-2009/2007CS0103-001510.htm

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Canada/BC Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund ended January 31, 2007

More than $150 million in funding is available to all B.C. communities under the Canada/BC Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund for water and sewer infrastructure projects.

The Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund helps support smaller scale municipal infrastructure such as water and wastewater treatment, or cultural and recreation projects, for smaller and First Nations communities.

The application process for accessing funding under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund began on October 12, 2006 and ended January 31, 2007.  Applications for funding under the CBCMRIF are no longer accepted.

--------------

Infrastructure Canada programs in Western Canada

http://www.wd.gc.ca/eng/4843.asp

--------------

Who works with who in partnership

http://www.th.gov.bc.ca/CBMRIF/

--------------------

Small Community Grant
This is an unconditional grant to municipalities to assist them to provide basic services. Grant amounts are based on a formula that factors in a base amount, population and assessment values. These grants generally apply to municipalities with populations up to 19,000.

Source cserv.gov.bc.ca/lgd/policy_research/local_government_grants.htm

---------------

B.C. Community Water Improvement Program
Program funds have been fully allocated - applications are no longer being accepted.
http://www.cd.gov.bc.ca/lgd/infra/infrastructure_grants/community_water_improvement.htm

Fraser Valley Regional District: Hatzic Island, Sheltered Cove and Vicinity Integrated Water System.
Provincial contribution: $796,223. Project value: $1,194,334.
This project will provide a safe and centralized drinking water system to the subdivisions of Sheltered Cove, Mountainview and Riverside, which are currently on boil water advisories. A major project component is a water main that will cross Hatzic Lake from Hatzic Island to Sheltered Cove. The project will
provide potable water for 103 residents.

Sunshine Coast Regional District: Davis Bay Water Main Replacement.
Provincial contribution: $200,000. Project value: $300,000.
Installation of 1350 m of ductile iron pipe from Bay Road to Nestman Road along the Sunshine Coast Highway.. This will
improve water quality and fire flows for 75 homes.

Thompson-Nicola Regional District: Walhachin Community Water System.
Provincial contribution: $73,333. Project value: $110,000.
The project includes installing chlorine monitoring and control equipment and other works to
improve drinking water quality protection and system reliability for 32 homes.

Thompson-Nicola Regional District: Evergreen Community Water System.
Provincial contribution: $21,667. Project value: $32,500.
Improving the Evergreen Estates Community Water System by renovating the reservoir to improve chlorine contact time, as well as other enhancements. The project will
improve water disinfection and improve system reliability for 16 service connections.

http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2005-2009/2005CS0074-001172-Attachment1.htm

Powell River Regional District: Myrtle Pond Water System Upgrade.
Provincial contribution: $703,457 Project value: $1,055,185.
Developing a new well, constructing a new reservoir, upgrading distribution pipes, and installing ultraviolet disinfection and chlorine treatment to provide a
community of 51 homes with a consistent source of potable drinking water.

http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2005-2009/2005CS0073-001086-Attachment1.htm

---------------

Local Government Grants Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 275

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Infrastructure Canada Program

Minister Colin Hansen joins MLA Dennis MacKay and Telkwa Mayor Sharon Hartwell in touring the community's recently opened water treatment facility. The village has received about $1.15 million for the first phase of its water system upgrade. The $1.78 million project will improve water supply and treatment.

Telkwa population: 1,443

http://www.gov.bc.ca/ecdev/popt/gallery/telkwa_1.htm

Phase 1A
Total Eligible Costs ($): 1,730,000
Contribution Breakdown:
Federal Share ($): 576,666
Provincial Share ($): 576,666
Applicant Share ($): 576,668

Phase 1B
Total Eligible Costs ($): 697,000
Contribution Breakdown:
Federal Share ($): 232,333
Provincial Share ($): 232,333
Applicant Share ($): 232,334

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Infrastructure Planning Grant Program
Provincial funding program for long-term plans and assessment studies to support local government infrastructure.
Ongoing intake - next round based on applications received by February 29, 2008.

cserv.gov.bc.ca/LGD/infra/infrastructure_grants/infrastructure_planning_grant.htm

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3. CORRESPONDENCE (on page 2)
3.1 Minister Ida Chong re: Approval for Infrastructure Planning Grants Minister Chong advised that the Regional District’s application under the Local Government Grants Act for infrastructure planning have been approved including a $5,000 grant for the Upper Fintry Water Utility study and a $6,500 grant for the West Kelowna Estates Water Utility study.

CARRIED

www.regionaldistrict.com/docs/boards_committees/mins//2007/07_10_15brdmin.pdf

Minister Ida Chong

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Water system revenue and expenses for Regional District run water systems. (source page 29)

http://www.regionaldistrict.com/docs/finance/CORD06FS.pdf

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BC's plan for safe drinking water

http://www.publications.gov.bc.ca/pubdetail.aspx?nato=7665003968

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Meeting Nov 05, 2007 at 7 PM at Killiney Beach Hall

regarding a water system for

Valley of the Sun, Upper Fintry, Kubas Property (Development at the front of Valley of the Sun), and Shalal Road

RDCO website informs residents of water meeting Nov 5, 2007

At the Nov 5, 2007 water meeting there were approx. 130 residents in attendance who all voted in favour of going ahead with a water system even if it cost $15,000 - $20,000 per property.  According to one scenario some properties may have to pay over $1,700 + per year plus a user fee according to Agua's report below.  More investigation needs to be done before deciding on lake water or ground water.  There will be a formal vote by petition when decisions have been made.

Clipart - New Agua Consulting Presentation to Residents Nov 5, 2007
This is a very informative presentation.

Photos of the standing room only attendance at Killiney Beach Hall on November 5, 2007

We heard it may take 3 years to develop a water system.  Probably takes 2 1/2 years to analyze and discuss it, and maybe 6 months to build it!  Its going to take far too long anyway!!

Nov. 9, 2007 we watched as one water cistern drove by on the back of a truck to be installed at a property in Valley of the Sun.

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Photo of the large lake at Valley of the Sun that nobody can see from the road because its farther into the bush.
Part of the panoramic view found at the link below.

Panoramic View of the large lake at Valley of the Sun.  This view was photographed on November 13, 2007.

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The costs provided are not fixed costs. They are estimated costs only
and, if the project proceeds, could be higher or lower upon completion of the project.

regionaldistrict.com/docs/engineering/NWwater/Upper Fintry - Valley of the Sun.pdf

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This is where you will find information on Valley of the Sun, Shalal Road, and Muir subdivisions forging ahead to bring water to each of their subdivisions.

On September 19, 2006 a local resident was turned away at Fintry Provincial Park and told they could not get water there for insurance reasons, as well as there is no backflow protection.

In September 2006 a water system survey was hand delivered to all properties of Muir and Valley of the Sun subdivisions with a house or building on it.  Only 8 surveys were returned.

This web page will keep you posted on the happenings regarding a water system.  Any new information will be posted as it becomes available.

Residents got together for a meeting February 15, 2007 and "Valley of the Sun water committee" was born.  The email for the water committee doesn't seem to be working but you can try it, maybe it works now.

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Water Bucket .ca - Okanagan

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October 2, 2007

Planning Grants Help Okanagan Westside Prepare for the Future

WESTSIDE – Peachland, Summerland, and the Central Okanagan Region will receive almost $57,000 in infrastructure grants from the Province to help plan for greener, healthier infrastructure development, Rick Thorpe, MLA for Okanagan-Westside announced today.

Central Okanagan Region: $5,000 for the Upper Fintry Water Utility Study. This will provide the options and cost estimates for providing a water supply and distribution system

Central Okanagan Region: $6,500 for the West Kelowna Estates Water Utility Study. This will provide the priorities and cost estimates for a capital plan for the West Kelowna Estates Water System with focus on the requirements for water intake supply, the pumphouse, water treatment and upgrades needed for the entire system.

rickthorpemla.bc.ca/EN/3887/57406 link no longer works

We will let you know when there are updates, so stay informed!

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If you have comments good or bad, solutions, concerns or complaints regarding a community water supply for Valley of the Sun and/or Muir subdivisions, please fill out the form below and let your neighbours know.  The more information you have, the better decision you can make.

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Comment Form

Comment on Regional District of Central Okanagan Water Systems to be posted here on okanaganlakebc.ca.

You are permitted to remain anonymous, just leave the text box blank.

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If you want to view comments, click here.

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If you have something you would like to see up here on the internet, please email

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Results of the Water System Survey

How To Disinfect Your Drinking Water

Ram Water Pump - Ram pumps pump water uphill
without electricity or powered engines.

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Water Survey and Water Comments

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Valley of the Sun Ponds and other Photos
Make a Comment

Big Pond ] FOI ] Gold Mine ] Middle Pond ] Minutes ] Pond 1 ] Rate Table ] Shorts Creek ] Single Pond ] Smaller Pond ] Survey ] Vegetation ] VOS Petition ] VOS Photos ] VOS Photos1 ] Well Data ] Wells ] [ Water System ] Water Systems ]

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Valley of the Sun Ponds and other Photos
Read Comments

Budget 09 ] FOI ] Survey ] Water System ]

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Westside Road Water Systems
Make a Comment

1973 Nov 7 OBWB ] 1973 Sep 27 OBWB ] 1970 Feb 16 Mun Aff ] 1970 Feb 9 PUC ] 1969 Sep 26 RDCO ] Advisory Services ] Bylaws ] FOI Act ] History ] Judgements ] Land Registry 60 ] Laws ] Letters Patent ] Licence ] Local Services 59 ] Local Service 59/495 ] Local Services 21/60 ] Local Services 70 ] Municipal Act 1960 ] Municipal Amend 69 ] Mun. Enabling ] Mun. Enabling 69 ] Order-In-Council ] Quashing ] RDCO CPA 1 ] Sub. Reg. 262/70 ] Town Planning 25 ] Water Advisories ]

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Westside Road Water Systems
Read Comments

1973 Nov 7 OBWB ] 1973 Sep 27 OBWB ] 1970 Feb 16 Mun Aff ] 1970 Feb 9 PUC ] 1969 Sep 26 RDCO ] Advisory Services ] Bylaws ] FOI Act ] History ] Judgements ] Land Registry 60 ] Laws ] Letters Patent ] Local Services 59 ] Local Service 59/495 ] Local Services 21/60 ] Local Services 70 ] Municipal Act 60 ] Municipal Amend 69 ] Mun. Enabling Act ] Mun. Enabling 69 ] Order-In-Council ] Quashing ] RDCO CPA 1 ] Sub. Reg. 262/70 ] Town Planning 25 ] Water Advisories ]

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Westside Road Gossip
Make a Comment

INDEX WR ] INDEX ALL ] Advis. Plan Comm ] Alt Approval ] Ambulance ] Argo Road Maint. ] BC Hydro ] Budget 2010 ] Budget 2011 ] Budget 2012 ] Budget 2013 ] Budget 2014 ] Budget 2015 ] Building Inspect ] Build Laws - BC ] Build Laws - RDCO ] Building Violations ] Bylaw Anon ] COW Elect. 08 ] COW Elect. 11 ] Director Edgson ] Dogs ] Easement Rds ] EDC ] Elect. Boundary ] Environ. Advisory ] ESS ] Finances ] Fintry Develop ] Fintry Park ] Fire Anon ] Fire Boat ] Fire Bylaws ] Fire Dept. ] Fire Dept FOI ] Fire Hydrants ] Fire Minutes ] Fires  House ] FOI Act ] Friends Fintry ] Garbage ] Garbage Area ] Garbage Bylaws ] Garbage Com 08 ] Garbage Contracts ] Garbage Finance ] Garbage FOI ] Garbage FOI ] Garbage LaCasa ] Garbage Locker ] Garbage Minutes ] Garbage NOWESI ] Garbage Ombudsman ] Garbage Prob ] Garbage Secret ] Garbage Solution ] Garbage Survey ] Garbage Traders ] Governance Wide ] Government ] Grants-in-aid ] Helicopters ] History ] Killiney Beach Park ] Killiney Hall ] LaCasa ] Motorized Rec. ] NWCA ] NWCA FOI ] NW OCP ] NW Parks ] OKIB ] OKIB Logging ] OKIB Road ] OKIB Tax ] Peacocks ] Police Tax ] Property Tax ] RDCO ] RDCO Dog Minutes ] RDCO Jokes ] RDCO Policy ] RDCO Regs ] Report Animals ] Residents Network ] Septic Systems ] Subdiv. History ] T. Mnt After Fire ] Terrace Mount. Fire ] Trench Burner ] Vote Boxes ] Water Budget 08 ] Water Budget 09 ] Water Budget 10 ] Water Bylaws ] Water Construct ] Water FOI ] Water Grants ] Water Judgement ] Water L Fintry ] Water Laws ] Water Meters ] Water Minutes ] Water Rates ] Water Right-of-Way ] Water Survey ] [ Water System ] Water Systems ] Water VOS ] Water VOS Pics ] Water Wells ] Water Well Data ] Westshore Playgrnd ] Westshore Sports ] Westside Rd. ] WR Development ] WR Incorporation ] WR Overpass ] WRIC ] Zoning Bylaw 66 ] Zoning Bylaw 81 ] Zoning Bylaw 871 ]

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Westside Road Gossip
Read Comments

Adv. Plan Comm. ] Alt. Approval ] Ambulance ] Argo Road ] BC Hydro ] Budget 2010 ] Budget 2011 ] Budget 2012 ] Budget 2013 ] Budget 2014 ] Budget 2015 ] Building Inspection ] Build Laws - BC ] Build Laws - RDCO ] Building Violations ] COW Elect 08 ] COW Elect. 11 ] Director Edgson ] Dogs ] Easement Roads ] EDC ] Elect. Boundary ] Environ. Advisory ] ESS ] Finance ] Fintry Develop ] Fintry Park ] Fire Boat ] Fire Bylaws ] Fire Dept. ] Fire Dept FOI ] Fire Hydrants ] Fire Minutes ] Fires House ] FOI Act ] Friends Fintry ] Garbage ] Garbage Area ] Garbage Bylaws ] Garb Comment 08 ] Garbage Contract ] Garbage Finance ] Garbage FOI ] Garbage FOI ] Garbage La Casa ] Garbage Locker ] Garbage Minutes ] Garbage NOWESI ] Garbage Ombudsman ] Garbage Questionaire ] Garbage Secret ] Garbage Solution ] Garbage Survey ] Garbage Traders ] Governance Wide ] Government ] Helicopters ] History ] Killiney Hall ] Killiney Park ] La Casa ] Motorized Rec. ] NW OCP ] NWCA ] NWCA FOI ] NW Parks ] OKIB ] OKIB Logging ] OKIB Road ] OKIB Tax ] Peacocks ] Police Tax ] Property Tax ] RDCO ] RDCO Dog Minutes ] RDCO Jokes ] RDCO Policy ] RDCO Regs ] Report Animals ] Septic Systems ] Subdiv. History ] T. Mtn After Fire ] Terrace Mnt. Fire ] Trench Burner ] Vote Box ] Water Budget 08 ] Water Budget 09 ] Water Budget 10 ] Water Bylaws ] Water Construct ] Water FOI ] Water Grants ] Water Judgements ] Water Laws ] Water Meters ] Water Minutes ] Water Rates ] Water Right-of-Way ] Water Survey ] Water System ] Water VOS ] Water VOS Pics ] Water Well Data ] Water Wells ] Westside Road ] WR Development ] WR Incorporation ] WR Overpass ] WRIC ] Zoning Bylaw 66 ] Zoning Bylaw 1981 ] Zoning Bylaw 871 ]

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Gossip
In Other Towns

INDEX ALL ] Boucherie Rd ] Kaleden ] Kelowna ] Naramata ] Oyama ] Peachland ] Penticton ] Summerland ] Vernon ] West Kelowna ] Westside Road ] Winfield ]

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Index

Boucherie Road ] Kaleden ] Kelowna ] Naramata ] Oyama ] Peachland ] Pentiction ] Summerland ] Vernon ] West Kelowna ] Westside Road ] Winfield ]

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You will find local North Westside Road BC businesses, services, classifieds, local arts and crafts, vacation waterfront rentals, plus much more located near and around Okanagan Lake BC.  We will be adding to this site, so come back and check it often.

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Central Okanagan BC Sagebrush Mariposa Lily