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Okanagan Lake community directory; okanaganlakebc.ca; okanagan community directory for kelowna, vernon, westbank, westside, winfield, kaleden, naramata, summerland, peachland, penticton, and oyama.

Regional District of Central Okanagan

PEACOCK CONTROL

Make a comment using the Comment form at the bottom of this webpage

Last update July 13, 2017

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We did not post this poster (below) to the local Bulletin Boards.

We believe that someone is terrorizing the North Westside Road area under false allegations.

There is nothing on okanaganlakebc.ca about any poisonings that we are aware of after doing a search on google, so we don't think anyone filled out a form and posted anything about this.

If you saw who posted this poster on the bulletin boards at Westshore Estates, Estamont Beach, Killiney Beach, or Valley of the Sun, please report it to Constable Warner of the Enderby RCMP 250-838-6818.  Constable Warner is aware of the poster.

Enderby, Armstrong and Falkland RCMP serve the North Westside Road area.

Caution - rise of poison to pets, chickens & wildlife (vehicle seen prowling overnight) Please report incidents to authorities (see okanaganlake bc.com gossip section)
Click poster for a larger copy

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UPDATE YOU ARE GOING TO LAUGH YOU'RE HEAD OFF:  That wasn't a peachick, it was a baby grouse lol
The RDCO took it to the SPCA and had a wildlife expert have a look.  The wildlife expert confirmed, its a grouse lmao.
Fruck am I ever stupid.  I looked at the tail and thought it looked like a peacock tail starting lol.
The wild life expert said the chick is old enough that it can be released anywhere.
Am I ever glad its not a peachick lol

July 12, 2017 saw a peahen with some peachicks going through my yard, that I don't own

If those are your several peachicks and peahen, can you please contain them, because I do not want them in my yard for several reasons, one being that the peafowl attract predators, another being that they eat my garden and strawberries and raspberries, and another being that they leave their droppings for me to step in, and another being that they squawk at 5:00am, and another being that they damage the paint on vehicles by flying and landing on them, and then perching on them or seeing their reflection in shiny vehicle paint and attack the vehicle because it sees its reflection and thinks its another peacock that it wants to fight.

Also please take care so as they are not squawking overnight and early in the morning please.  Roosters are to be contained in a sound proof building from 8pm to 7am, and so the same for Peacocks.

Thank you for containing your peafowl, so no free peafowl ad has to go in the newspaper again Sharon Perkins or Jim, if those are your birds.

I thought if I don't catch one, the owner will say nobody owns the peafowl again, and the peafowl will be left to roam and populate again.  And again an ad would have to go in the newspaper again.  So I decided to catch one to find out who owns the peachick.  If nobody claims the peachick, I can use it to catch the rest and/or give it to someone who lives far far away.

You know if I was a coyote, your pea sized chick would have been a goner in one bite!!!

Anyway your peachick is at the Regional District of Central Okanagan in case you thought maybe one was eaten by a predator.  Did some get eaten already?  Or did the racoon eat a couple of her eggs.  I didn't count eight peachicks.  Usually they have 8 eggs I read, and if they loose an egg, they will lay another to make 8.  Don't know how true that is.

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.pdf icon November 26, 2012 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Nothing was mentioned in the Highlights about a fine amount being added to the Ticket Bylaw so that RDCO Animal Bylaw #880 for Roosters had a fine amount.  Before this amendment, a fine could not be levied for Roosters not contained in a sound proof building overnight because in the original ticket bylaw someone forgot to add a fine amount for RDCO Animal Bylaw #880 in regard to Roosters.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio November 26, 2012 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (60.8 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files November 26, 2012 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 11.1 Ticket Utilization Amendment Bylaw Roosters - .wma (158 KB)

This bylaw was amended because RDCO animal bylaw requires roosters to be in a sound proof building overnight and RDCO forgot to add a fine for roosters in this ticket bylaw.

.pdf icon November 26, 2012 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

11. NEW BUSINESS
11.1 Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1318, 1st, 2nd and 3rd reading and Adoption (All Directors Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated November 16, 2012 outlined the amendment is being requested is for housekeeping purposed to the ticket schedule for the Animal Control Bylaw.

BAKER/FIELDING
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1318, 2012 be given first, second and third readings and adopted this 26th day of November 2012.

CARRIED

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio November 26, 2012 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (60.8 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files November 26, 2012 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 11.1 Ticket Utilization Amendment Bylaw Roosters - .wma (158 KB)

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RDCO Fines 2011 .pdf icon Item 6.1 Amendments to Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw

Did you know that under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act that if the SPCA fails to act on a cruelty investigation that should have been investigated, that they are liable to a fine of only $100

 

Poll on Castanet.net about Peacocks and Bunnys

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WARNING - THIS JOKE MIGHT NOT BE FUNNY TO EVERYONE, BUT IT IS TO US RIGHT NOW!

BIRD CRAP SENSOR -- NEW FROM FORD

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Wanna know what flowers peacocks like to eat, and what they don't like to eat?

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RDCO Chief Administrative Officer Harold Reay told okanaganlakebc.ca that RDCO does not regulate peacocks.  Obviously Harold Reay doesn't know his job because RDCO Animal Control Bylaw #880 regulates peacocks.  Peacocks are considered a Pheasant.

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Just like the McCoys, but these are the McCaws

Popoff v. Krafczyk, 1990 CanLII 589 (BC SC)

Appeal - Popoff v. Krafczyk, 1991 CanLII 1425 (BC CA)

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Peacocks sitting on a homes roof squawking at 5:32am

PEAFOWL AT VALLEY OF THE SUN COULD COST TAXPAYERS THOUSANDS

REMEMBER THE BUNNY PROBLEM DOWNTOWN KELOWNA?  It cost at least $54,000 for a one year contract to capture ferral bunnies in Kelowna.

There are two peafowl remaining at Valley of the Sun that the owner claims are not his/hers.  Although there were 54 peacocks at Valley of the Sun last year in 2011, the owner claims he/she has moved all their peacocks to another location.  But there is still a breeding pair of peafowl left at large and unclaimed. 

RDCO has washed its hands of the peacocks, stating that if nobody owns the peacocks that RDCO will do nothing but let the peafowl populate because they don't have the resources.  What a stupid answer in our opinion.

It only took about 3 years for 2 peafowl to become 54 peafowl.  Peafowl are very hard to catch because they can fly into the trees.  The only way to capture them is to snare, shoot, or feed them until they go into a building and you can close the doors on them.  It will not be an easy task to capture peafowl alive.

Breeding season is all summer, which peafowl do a lot of squawking during breeding season.  Peafowl are loud like a rooster.  One peacock can lay 8 eggs.  If a Raven or crow steals an egg, she will lay another, up to 26 eggs in a season.

Peafowl have been found 15 km's away from Valley of the Sun down at Westshore Estates, so don't think that it is just a Valley of the Sun problem.  Its a Westshore Estates, Killiney Beach, Estamont Beach and Ewings Landing problem too.

Be aware that your nice shiny new vehicle can be pecked because if a peacock see's its reflection in the paint, it will think its another peacock and will try and peck it.   Your vehicle can be scratched from peafowl roosting on it too. Peafowl leave large seagull type poop all over your yard and sun deck.  Peafowl squawk at 3am and 5am and are much like a guard dog and squawk at noises.  They like to squawk lots before dusk.  Sure peacocks are pretty, but their eggs also attract Ravens and crows which are also very noisy.  You should hear what it sounds like when Ravens or crows fight with the peahen over the peahens eggs.  Now there are Ravens or crows hanging around squawking at Valley of the Sun.  They squawk for 1/2 hour at a time sometimes.

If you don't complain to RDCO now before this gets to be a bigger problem, as we have complained, and the two peacocks become 100's of peacocks like the rabbits, RDCO will eventually have to charge you thousands of dollars to hire someone to capture the peacocks.  Do you have $54,000 to waste like what was wasted capturing bunnies that people let run loose?  Right now RDCO has to capture only 2 peacocks, which it will cost a lot less than $54,000 to capture 2 peafowl.

People wonder why their broke... well in part its due to policy like RDCO's, and people not saying anything!

If you have tons of money and don't want to make time to complain, then don't, but be prepared to reach into your pocketbook to capture peafowl if you don't complain.  If people don't complain, RDCO will do nothing.

If you are broke like us and don't want to wait for this to become a bigger problem and you don't want to pay out a pile of money to capture the two peafowl turned into who knows how many, you might think about giving RDCO Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer Rhoda Mueller or RDCO Chair Robert Hobson a phone call at 250-763-4918.  You will probably get their answering machines but please leave them a message and they will get back to you.

If you do call, please send us a note by filling out this form to let us know you called, and we will keep track of how many people called in to complain and post it here so RDCO can't say okanaganlakebc.ca is the only one complaining!!!  We will only post the number of people who called, and not your name or any identifiable information.

This is a reply email we received July 18, 2012 from City of Kelowna in regards to the costs associated to capture feral rabbits within the City of Kelowna.

Over the 2-3 years, our program captured between 600-700 feral rabbits. The initial contract was for $50,000 and we followed up with a two years maintenance contract. The total cost was =- $75,000.

Any further questions please give me a call.

Thanks
Blair


Blair Stewart, RPF, Certified Arborist
Urban Forestry Supervisor
Civic Operations
TEL 250 469-8843
FAX 250 862-3335

City of Kelowna 1359 KLO Rd, Kelowna, BC V1W 3N8 kelowna.ca

There was a story on CHBC news July 11, 2012 about how people in one community were trying to capture the peafowl in their neighborhood because the peafowl were pecking at shiny new cars and causing damage.  They were putting tarps over their cars.  We tried to find the story on July 12, 2012 morning but it wasn't posted on CHBC news website yet.  And we checked again the next day and it still wasn't posted, so don't bother looking for it, its not there.

.pdf icon February 14, 2008 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Minutes

5. Development Services

5.1 City of Kelowna's request for the management of European Rabbits (forwarded from the January 28, 2008 Regional Board meeting)

The City of Kelowna has identified that there is a nuisance feral rabbit population within its boundaries and requested that the regional district expand its dog control function to remedy this problem.

Staff noted that the regional district is limited to the types of animals that are identified under the Local Government Act (part 22, Div.1, Section 703). Staff noted that no other municipality or electoral area within the Central Okanagan have
indicated a similar problem with rabbits. Further it was noted that the regional district does not have the staff resources, land to house, nor the infrastructure to expand this service. The current dog control function does not have the statutory authority to provide such a service. Should the regional district seek the authority it would charge the City to provide such a service, therefore it was recommended that the City of Kelowna handle the issue themselves.

FINDLATER/EDGSON
THAT the City of Kelowna's request for the management of European rabbits and other problem wildlife be referred back to the City of Kelowna as the regional district does not have the statutory authority to provide such a service and that no
other municipality or electoral area within the Central Okanagan has a similar problem
.

CARRIED

Rogue peacock patrols UBC's Okanagan campus
CBC News - Thursday, June 24, 2010

Petey the peacock has been patrolling the UBC Okanagan campus in Kelowna for several weeks. (Jackie Sharkey/CBC)
A rogue peacock has been strutting his stuff at the University of British Columbia's Okanagan campus, but nobody seems to know where he came from or who's responsible for making sure he comes to no harm.

The fully grown male bird has caught the attention of students and staff alike, who generally agree that he's a lively addition to the Kelowna campus.

Petey, as he has been named, has been patrolling the grounds for a couple of weeks, creating quite a spectacle for students like Luke Allinson.

"I just walked out of my dorm one day to take out my recycling and bam, it was right there."

Student Adam Goodwin said the colourful bird is a welcome addition.

"I think it's really quite delightful that there's just a peacock, wandering around the campus," said Goodwin.

Origin unclear

But no one's taking responsibility for the rogue bird, and some students like Ranjan Dutta are worried someone might actually be plucking its beautiful feathers.

"It's quite obvious. Like on this side of the lower ones, you see so many eyes there. But on the other side there's none. So I wonder if somebody has plucked it," said Dutta.

Dutta said it's beautiful to have the majestic bird on campus, but it may be endangered by its own roguish nature.

"The threat is that the bird will hurt somebody when it's scared.… He's kind of guarding that door and an animal that is scared is very dangerous to the public and itself," Dutta said.

Assistant grounds manager Al King said he thinks the bird belongs to a nearby farmer.

"He really likes to get around. This week I'm going to play over here … next week, who knows where he's going to go. I've seen him almost everywhere," King said.

The authorities don't seem too concerned. The SPCA said it knows about Petey, and has reported him to the provincial conservation officers, who say the peacock is a domestic animal, so it's not their jurisdiction.

Officials with the Regional District of Central Okanagan said they regulate game birds, but it's not their job to collect them if they run astray.

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Feral bunny bill $4K a month
Castanet.net - by Jennifer Zielinski - Story: 64646 - Sep 15, 2011

In the spring of 2008 TRACS had 67 rabbits in their care, today they have 800.

Sinikka Crosland the vice president of TRACS says it has become difficult to care for 800 rabbits.

“It’s a challenge to get the money and not only to feed them but the biggest portion of that would be veterinary bills," says Crosland.

TRACS started a Feral Rabbit Relocation Program and obtained a permit from the Ministry of Environment to relocate and sterilize the bunnies that had been multiplying around the Okanagan. The society constructed secure pens on an acreage belonging to a rural family to house the rabbits.

TRACS has never had this many rabbits in its care, according to Crosland.

“I am sure everyone can imagine that caring for 800 animals is a lot for one little group to handle.”

According to Crosland if she averaged out the monthly cost of food and bedding for each rabbit the total would amount to about $4,000.

Crosland adds that the cost for repairing and building new pens is also pricey.

The City of Kelowna does incur the cost of spaying or neutering the animals after they awarded TRACS a contract back in 2008 to capture, spay/neuter and find homes for the feral rabbits.

The rabbits are located throughout the city in six different sanctuaries with the largest sanctuary housing 400 rabbits.

A few months ago the Feral Rabbit Relocation Program reached the striking number of 800 animals, and Crosland says she’s hoping the number doesn’t increase.

“As most people may have noticed there aren’t rabbits hopping around Kelowna anymore but there is the odd pocket that may spring up here and there that we have to be on top of.”

By being 'on top of it', Crosland means capturing the animals, sterilizing them and providing any necessary veterinary care.

According to Crosland, TRACS is one of the only societies taking in rabbits throughout the Kelowna area.

“I know the SPCA has a few rabbits for adoption but the Humane Society doesn’t take in rabbits anymore, although they have helped us out with sterilization in the past.”

TRACS is concerned with helping all animals but as Crosland explains when they have this many rabbits then the priority has to be on them.

“Hopefully we would never have to cap the number of rabbits that we take in. We do have an active adoption program and that helps somewhat to lessen numbers a little bit.”

Crosland says there is good legislation in place with the city that has really helped to reduce the amount of rabbits in the Okanagan.

“There aren’t many rabbits anymore. With the trapping the numbers have declined although we do get the odd call now and again.”

TRACS is holding a fundraiser dance on October 22 at the Okanagan Mission Community Hall, with doors opening at 8 p.m.

For more information on tickets for the fundraiser, donating to TRACS or adopting a rabbit click here or call 778.754.5522

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Just in, readable copy of the tickets that were issued in 2012 to the owner of the wild peacocks, one ticket was CANCELLED
RDCO Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer Rhoda Mueller agreed the report stated


click cancelled ticket for a larger copy

 


click ticket for a larger copy

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THE OWNER SAID HE/SHE WOULD TAKE IN THE WILD PEACOCKS THAT HE/SHE CLAIMED ARE NOT HIS OR HERS.

BELOW ARE RDCO's REPORTS THAT STATE SUCH.

Complaints started in April 2011 when the peacocks were at at large and started squawking (breeding season) at 5am, but RDCO didn't get around to doing anything until August 4, 2011?  That is a 4 month wait!!!  Is waiting 4 months for RDCO to act, an acceptable wait for you if you were woken by 54 squawking peacocks at 5am many mornings?

August 4, 2011 complaint form states: spoke to NAME REMOVED and he/she has taken in the wild peacocks/peahens and will move them to an alternate location hopefully by the end of August 2011.  Is aware only 5 permitted, and permitted up to 50 pigeons.

Says the rooster that is crowing is not his/hers.


click complaint form for a larger copy

How is RDCO suppose to catch a rooster crowing at 5am or a dog barking in the middle of the night if they only work day shift 9am - 5pm!!! 

===================

March 5, 2012 counted more than 5 birds behind property.  Issued ticket for too many birds and no ticket for peacocks at large.

March 9, 2012 still working to contain the peafowl.

March 14, 2012 Request from NAME REMOVED who is trying to help peacock owner to cancel ticket Several want to change bylaw.  RDCO agreed and called peacock owner to explain.


click complaint form for a larger copy

====================

April 26, 2012 issued ticket section 2.2 of RDCO's Animal Bylaw
Section 2.2 No keeper of livestock, small livestock or farmed fur bearing animals shall allow their animals to run at large.

Small livestock means poultry, rabbit or other small animals similar in size and weight but does not include farmed fur bearing animals.

May 4, 2012 rooster owner says going to shoot the rooster today. Owner says still trying to contain the peafowl.

May 18, 2012 owner has built a moving cage for the peafowl.

May 28, 2012 Two remain.  Concluded.  (Unfounded)


click complaint form for a larger copy

===================

Because the person said they would take in the wild peacocks, why are the remaining wild peacocks not considered theirs?  The person taking in the wild peacocks is the original owner to begin with anyway.  In our opinion, the peafowl owner is a liar saying he/she does not own the remaining two peafowl!  No its not his/her rooster crowing .. yeh right.  The rooster owner claimed they don't hear anyone else's rooster crowing... probably because the rooster owner is too drunk all the time is why he/she can't hear their own rooster.  We drove by and know who's rooster was crowing and who's pigeons and chickens drink out of water filled pot holes in the road.  Makes a person wonder if the chickens had water available to them that they were drinking water from pot holes in the road.

 

Please call RDCO and make a complaint about the 2 remaining breeding pair of peafowl, before they populate... it might already be too late and there might already be another 8 peachicks emerging but its better to nip the problem in the bud now before it becomes a bigger problem.

We believe the owner of the peafowl deserves another ticket!  Such a drunk liar!!!

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Rabbits being evicted - video
CHBC News July 26, 2012

Dozens of rabbits which were save from a cull program in Kelowna a few years ago are suddenly in need of a new home. 

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PEACOCKS ATTRACT RAVENS

RAVENS EAT BABY TURTLES, FROGS , LIZARDS, AND PEACOCK EGGS. ALL OF WHICH LIVE AT VALLEY OF THE SUN PONDS.

THERE ARE 3 PONDS AT VALLEY OF THE SUN WHERE THE WESTERN PAINTED TURTLE AND LOTS OF FROGS LIVE.  THE WESTERN PAINTED TURTLE IS ON BC's BLUE LIST OF SPECIES AND THERE ARE AT RISK FROGS AS WELL.

RDCO SAID NOBODY OWNS THE PEACOCKS AT VALLEY OF THE SUN AND THAT RDCO WILL DO NOTHING BUT LET THE PEACOCKS POPULATE.  THE SPCA AND BC MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT ARE NOT CONCERNED... WHY NOT?

BLUE LIST:
Includes any ecological community, and indigenous species and subspecies considered to be of special concern (formerly vulnerable) in British Columbia. Elements are of special concern because of characteristics that make them particularly sensitive to human activities or natural events. Blue-listed elements are at risk, but are not Extirpated, Endangered or Threatened.

ABOUT TURTLES
Not every nest is successfully hatched, as up to 90% of all turtle nests are lost to predators. Freshly laid eggs are dug up and consumed, a Raven has found this nest. He searches for more and flips the laying turtles up side down for the eggs, before they can be buried.

PROTECTION
Federal Protection
The Western Painted Turtle, Pacific Coast population, is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.
In British Columbia, the species is not protected under provincial legislation.

Species at Risk - Western Painted Turtle
Significant population declines have occurred on southern Vancouver Island, and in the Fraser, Okanagan, and Similkameen Valleys. The main threats are habitat loss and fragmentation due to agricultural and urban development, roadkill, increased nest predation, and injuries from angling gear.

Search species at risk by Regional District

Search species at risk by Species

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.pdf icon October 13, 2011 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Ticket Bylaw Fine Changes

The Regional Board has approved amendments affecting the fees and fines structure in the Regional District Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw. The changes are the result of a review of the fines and fees structure of the Regional District and other local governments throughout the Central Okanagan and around the Province. Among the changes: fines for
all infractions of the Sign Bylaw rise $50 to $100; fines under the Smoke Control Bylaw are elevated from $100 to $150 and fines under both the Animal and Noise Control bylaws are structured to include increasing penalties for a second and subsequent infractions. As well, new ticketing offences have been added for relevant sections of the RDCO Building, Zoning, Subdivision and Development Servicing bylaws as well as for the Ellison and Rural Westside Official Community Plan bylaws and the Joe Rich Rural Land Use Bylaw.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 13, 2011 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (144 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2011 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Amendments to Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw - .wma (2.49 MB)

.pdf icon October 13, 2011 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.1 Amendments to Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw.pdf

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click link above for entire contents.

Agenda No: 6.1
Mtg Date: October 13, 2011

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT REPORT For the Regional Board October 13, 2011

TO: Chair & Members of the Regional Board
FROM: Rhoda Mueller, Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer
DATE: October 5, 2011
SUBJECT: Amendments to Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw No. 435, 1990

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1299 be given three readings and adopted.

BACKGROUND:
A review of housekeeping issues of the Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw No. 435 is one of the initiatives of the Inspections Section of Development Services.

Staff compared the current RDCO ticket fine amounts with those of the City of Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon and the Capital Regional District. The following changes are being recommended:

-Fees for the Sign Bylaw were elevated from $50 to $100 for all fines.
-Fees for the Smoke Control Bylaw were elevated from $100 to $150 for each fine.
- The Animal and Noise Control bylaw ticket fees are now structured to include an increase in fines for the second and subsequent offences. (Animal bylaw is different than the Dog bylaw)
- Four ticket fines of the two Parks bylaws that deal with dogs were elevated to $100 to match the fees of the Dog Control bylaw.
- The ticket fine for graffiti, under the Unsightly Premises bylaw was increased from $100 to $250 because the elevated fees of other Municipalities stood out at $250 and $1000.
- New ticket offences were added for sections of the Building, Zoning, Joe Rich Rural Land Use, Subdivision and Development Servicing, Ellison Official Community Plan and Rural Westside Official Community Plan bylaws. And, new ticket offence schedules No. 23 to 28 have been added for bylaws were there are currently none.

These changes will ensure that ticket bylaws match regulatory bylaws. Having ticket fines for bylaw sections that prohibit or regulate, will assist enforcement because instead of having to file a Long Form Information and Summons in Provincial Court, a ticket can be served and the choice to dispute is up to the person charged.

Respectfully submitted,

Rhoda Mueller, Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer

Dan Plamondon, Director of Development Services

----------------------------------------------------

FINES FOR VIOLATIONS IN REGARDS TO RDCO ANIMAL CONTROL
(Noise and Animal Control Bylaw is different than the Dog Control Bylaw and does not include dogs)

RDCO's Schedule 5 of Bylaw No. 1299, 2011 - Tickets for violations against RDCO's Animal Control Bylaw
click RDCO's Schedule 5 of Bylaw No. 1299, 2011 to view larger print

 

Schedule 7 of RDCO Bylaw 1299, 2011 in regards to noise
Schedule 7 of RDCO Bylaw 1299, 2011 in regards to noise
click for a larger copy

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 13, 2011 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (144 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2011 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Amendments to Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw - .wma (2.49 MB)

.pdf icon October 13, 2011 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

6. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

Bylaw Enforcement

6.1 Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1299, 2011, 1st, 2nd and 3rd readings and Adoption (All Directors-Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated October 5, 2011 provided background for amendments to the RDCO Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw. The question was raised why weeds ticketing could not fall under the ticket adjudication program. Staff noted that with limited resources there would be additional expenses to run the program at the Regional District, that there are not many weed tickets written and when they are they are complex situations.

BAKER/EDGSON
THAT the Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1299, 2011 be given first, second and third readings and adopted this 13th day of October 2011.

CARRIED

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 13, 2011 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (144 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2011 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Amendments to Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw - .wma (2.49 MB)

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Feral bunny bill $4K a month
Castanet.net - by Jennifer Zielinski - Story: 64646 - Sep 15, 2011

In the spring of 2008 TRACS had 67 rabbits in their care, today they have 800.

Sinikka Crosland the vice president of TRACS says it has become difficult to care for 800 rabbits.

“It’s a challenge to get the money and not only to feed them but the biggest portion of that would be veterinary bills," says Crosland.

TRACS started a Feral Rabbit Relocation Program and obtained a permit from the Ministry of Environment to relocate and sterilize the bunnies that had been multiplying around the Okanagan. The society constructed secure pens on an acreage belonging to a rural family to house the rabbits.

TRACS has never had this many rabbits in its care, according to Crosland.

“I am sure everyone can imagine that caring for 800 animals is a lot for one little group to handle.”

According to Crosland if she averaged out the monthly cost of food and bedding for each rabbit the total would amount to about $4,000.

Crosland adds that the cost for repairing and building new pens is also pricey.

The City of Kelowna does incur the cost of spaying or neutering the animals after they awarded TRACS a contract back in 2008 to capture, spay/neuter and find homes for the feral rabbits.

The rabbits are located throughout the city in six different sanctuaries with the largest sanctuary housing 400 rabbits.

A few months ago the Feral Rabbit Relocation Program reached the striking number of 800 animals, and Crosland says she’s hoping the number doesn’t increase.

“As most people may have noticed there aren’t rabbits hopping around Kelowna anymore but there is the odd pocket that may spring up here and there that we have to be on top of.”

By being 'on top of it', Crosland means capturing the animals, sterilizing them and providing any necessary veterinary care.

According to Crosland, TRACS is one of the only societies taking in rabbits throughout the Kelowna area.

“I know the SPCA has a few rabbits for adoption but the Humane Society doesn’t take in rabbits anymore, although they have helped us out with sterilization in the past.”

TRACS is concerned with helping all animals but as Crosland explains when they have this many rabbits then the priority has to be on them.

“Hopefully we would never have to cap the number of rabbits that we take in. We do have an active adoption program and that helps somewhat to lessen numbers a little bit.”

Crosland says there is good legislation in place with the city that has really helped to reduce the amount of rabbits in the Okanagan.

“There aren’t many rabbits anymore. With the trapping the numbers have declined although we do get the odd call now and again.”

TRACS is holding a fundraiser dance on October 22 at the Okanagan Mission Community Hall, with doors opening at 8 p.m.

For more information on tickets for the fundraiser, donating to TRACS or adopting a rabbit click here or call 778.754.5522

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Maddening marmots all part of the season
Kelowna Capital News - June 6, 2010 - by Jennifer Smith

MARMOTS have become a common site around the city of late. But wildlife experts say they are not following in the footsteps of feral rabbits.

Could marmots be the next rabbits?

Not likely, according to local wildlife experts, though they admit you will likely see several marmots lining the old bunny haunts in coming weeks as a groundswell of babies start leaving the nest.

“As their babies mature, they’ll start to disperse,” said Pete Wise, urban wildlife specialist.

For those who have noticed an unusual number of the furry little critters digging in gardens and roaming the roads, Wise said fear not, there is nothing out of the ordinary about their presence.

Marmots build a summer den and a winter den and move out of populated places like the city as summer approaches, by
building dens to hop to as they flee the area.

For now, that means a lot of marmots on city streets and according to Wise, it will likely mean he’ll receive several calls from concerned car owners finding the little critters are burrowing in their cars.

“The best thing to do, at least the least expensive way to deal with it, is to park beside some grass with a hedge and open the hood,” said Wise. You open the hood as then the marmot will not want to sit on top of the engine, where they’ve been known to hide out, chewing on wires and wreaking havoc on the vehicle.

Wise warns the home remedy will only work if you don’t peek—and keep the dogs away; patience is the name of the game.

jsmith "at" kelownacapnews.com

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City of Kelowna Rabbit Control

European Feral Rabbit Control Program

Feral rabbits are considered an invasive species by the provincial Ministry of Environment. Feral rabbits (animals that have escaped from domestication and returned, partly or wholly, to their wild state) have caused severe damage in other areas around the world. These rabbits could be particularly damaging to Kelowna’s agricultural community and have already been reported as a problem on several farms in the Kelowna area.

.pdf icon Feral Rabbit Poster

The feral rabbit control program in Kelowna is overseen by a subcontractor.

Rabbit Bylaws
On November 25, 2008, Council approved several bylaw changes that will:

Prohibit the feeding of rabbits (or other animals) in parks or public spaces;
Prohibit the sale or adoption of rabbits that have not been spayed or neutered;
Prohibit uncontained feral or pet rabbits from occurring on private property; and
Require property owners to clean up problem breeding sites (e.g. wood piles).

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Culling of rabbits in Kelowna sparks police probe
CBC News - Monday, September 29, 2008

RCMP investigating allegations of animal cruelty

The City of Kelowna says there are around 2,000 feral rabbits in the city, and it is spending $54,000 on a one-year contract to get rid of them.

Police are investigating allegations that the way hired contractors cull feral rabbits in Kelowna constitutes animal cruelty.

Kelowna city council contracted EBB Environmental Consulting Inc. in May to eliminate about 2,000 rabbits following complaints that the animals had swarmed the city's lawns and parks in recent years.

Gwenda Garrett, a security guard working in the city, told CBC News on Monday that while on patrol Saturday morning, she saw a man shooting a feral rabbit, then two people stomping on the animal's head.

"The bunny was flopping around on the grass and a female got out of the passenger side of the truck. She went over to where the bunny was. She stomped on it really hard four times," Garrett said.
 
"It was still flopping around because it didn't die yet. Then the driver of the truck went over and stomped on it twice and it still didn't die. And then he crouched down and I believe I watched him break the rabbit's neck."

She reported the case to Kelowna RCMP, who are investigating to see whether there is evidence of animal cruelty.

"Because there is a section of the … Criminal Code that deals with cruelty to animals, we will be looking at it solely from that perspective and deciding whether or not enough evidence exists to satisfy [the] Crown that a charge should be laid," Const. Steve Holmes said.

"It all has to do with the interpretation of how the bunnies met their fate and the method used, and obviously, to people it appears to be very inhumane."
Kelowna city forester Ian Wilson says a single shot from an air gun normally puts down a rabbit quickly and humanely.(CBC)
Municipal forester Ian Wilson said the city is looking into the case, adding that the workers from EBB were just doing their job.

One method being used to cull the rabbits is to shoot them with an air gun, he said.

"They use this high-power rifle that would kill the animal instantaneously, [but] there is sometimes a little bit of twitching or movement in the animals," Wilson said.

"Normally, with a single shot, it does put down the animal quite quickly and humanely. I think that's the definition of humanely, as quickly and with as little suffering for the animal as possible," he said.

EBB said the rabbit in question was dead or close to death and its muscles were twitching, so the worker simply broke its neck to finish the job.

The city is spending $54,000 on a one-year contract to get rid of the animals.

The B.C. SPCA has said that while it doesn't condone the killing of animals, the rabbit situation in Kelowna is a huge problem.

VIDEO: Bonnie Allen reports on allegations of animal cruelty in culling rabbits (Runs 2:07)

Gwenda Garrett says the rabbit was still flopping after being shot with an air gun and stomped on the head several times.(CBC)

Feral rabbits to be culled in Kelowna

Kelowna rabbit exterminators call for RCMP protection

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.pdf icon January 28, 2008 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Meeting

There was nothing mentioned in the Highlights about Rabbit Management

.pdf icon January 28, 2008 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Meeting Minutes

3.4 City of Kelowna re: Management of European Rabbits and Other Problem Wildlife

Staff will present a report at the Governance & Services meeting in February.

BAKER/LETNICK
THAT the January 22, 2008 letter from the City of Kelowna regarding the request from Kelowna Council to expand the Regional District's Animal Control Function beyond existing dog control contract, to include the investigation, control and enforcement of nuisance animal complaints, including rabbits be referred to staff to report to the Governance & Services Committee.

CARRIED

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.pdf icon February 14, 2008 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Minutes

5. Development Services

5.1 City of Kelowna's request for the management of European Rabbits (forwarded from the January 28, 2008 Regional Board meeting)

The City of Kelowna has identified that there is a nuisance feral rabbit population within its boundaries and requested that the regional district expand its dog control function to remedy this problem.

Staff noted that the regional district is limited to the types of animals that are identified under the Local Government Act (part 22, Div.1, Section 703). Staff noted that no other municipality or electoral area within the Central Okanagan have
indicated a similar problem with rabbits. Further it was noted that the regional district does not have the staff resources, land to house, nor the infrastructure to expand this service. The current dog control function does not have the statutory authority to provide such a service. Should the regional district seek the authority it would charge the City to provide such a service, therefore it was recommended that the City of Kelowna handle the issue themselves.

FINDLATER/EDGSON
THAT the City of Kelowna's request for the management of European rabbits and other problem wildlife be referred back to the City of Kelowna as the regional district does not have the statutory authority to provide such a service and that no
other municipality or electoral area within the Central Okanagan has a similar problem
.

CARRIED

According to what we were reading the Regional District of Central Okanagan does have the authority to regulate rabbits because a Regional District does have "Broad Power" and can regulate animals not mentioned in the Local Government Act.  Click here to see where we found out this information.

Plus the Local Government Act specifically mentions RABBITS

Local Government Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 323
Part 22 — Miscellaneous Powers
This Act is Current to September 28, 2011
Division 1 — Regulation of Animals
Animal control authority
703 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the board may, by bylaw, do one or more of the following:
(a) regulate or prohibit the keeping of dogs, horses, cattle, sheep, goats, swine, rabbits or other animals and define areas in which they may be kept or may not be kept;
 

City of Kelowna had a feral rabbit problem .. upwards of 800 feral rabbits

Fintry has a ferral peacock problem still to this day of October, 12, 2011 because the man who claimed he has contained all his peacocks still has some running around and the Regional District refuse to do anything about them claiming they don't have a place to keep them or a way to collect them.  We have a whole list of people who would take the peacocks.  RDCO could hire an animal control company who will capture peacocks like Wise Wildlife Control whom told us that RDCO has used their services before.

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Jim Edgson on the BUNNY population in Kelowna

“We don’t have a problem (in) Westside because we have coyotes to deal with them,” Findlater said, somewhat jokingly.

A comment which led Central Okanagan West director Jim Edgson to chime in.

“And coyotes deal with the problem in our area too–(as do) hawks, eagles and owls.”

But, for Kelowna Mayor Sharon Shepherd, what to do with a problem bunny population was no laughing matter.

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From How Stuff Works

The Indian peacock is Pavo cristatus; the Javanese peacock, P. muticus. The Congo peacock is Afropavo congensis. Peacocks belong to the family Phasianidae.

From Encyclopedia Britannica

Phasianidae, the pheasant family, a bird family (order Galliformes) that includes among its members the jungle fowl (from which the domestic chicken is descended), partridge, peacock, pheasant, and quail. Some classifications assign the turkey to Phasianidae, whereas several others place it in the family Meleagrididae.

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The Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal Control Bylaw #880, 2000 regulates peafowl.

Peafowl are a relative of the pheasant.

A male peafowl is called a peacock.  A female peafowl is called a peahen.  A baby peafowl is called a peachick.

REGIONAL DISTRICT OF CENTRAL OKANAGAN ANIMAL CONTROL BYLAW NO. 880, 2000

*Note* Below is not the entire bylaw but only a snippet, click the link above or below to read the entire contents. July 12th, 2011 we talked to RDCO and were told that Peacocks are a relative of the pheasant, and that RDCO's Animal Control Bylaw does regulate Peacocks.

Being a Bylaw to Control Animals

WHEREAS the Regional District of Central Okanagan has adopted the extended service of animal control;

AND WHEREAS the Regional District of Central Okanagan deems it expedient to replace the Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal and Bird Regulation Bylaw No. 398, 1989;

NOW THEREFORE, the Regional District of Central Okanagan in open meeting assembled enacts as follows:

1. Definitions
In this Bylaw all words and phrases shall have their normal or common meaning except where this is changed, modified or expanded by the definitions set forth below:

Farmed fur bearing animals means all animals that are wild by nature, kept in captivity and whose pelts are commonly used for commercial purposes, but does not include a species of animal excluded by Provincial Regulations.

Farmed game means any animals held under the authority of a license under the Game Farm Act and includes fallow deer, bison and reindeer.

Game birds include guinea fowl, pheasant, partridge, quail, silkies, squab and tinamou.

Inspector shall mean the Bylaw Enforcement Officer, Director of Inspection Services or any other person authorized to enforce or assist in the enforcement of this Bylaw.

Keep/keeper/keeping means raising and/or maintaining, owning possessing or harbouring.

Livestock includes cattle, horse, mule, ass, sheep, goat, swine, musk ox, llama, alpaca, farmed game and ratites.

Pet means a domesticated animal kept for pleasure as opposed to being kept for a utilitarian purpose.

Poultry means domesticated birds kept for eggs, meat, feathers, hide, cosmetic or medicinal purposes and includes chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys and game birds.

Ratites mean birds that have small or rudimentary wings and no keel to the breastbone and include ostriches, rheas and emus.

Run at large means livestock, small livestock and farmed fur bearing animals that are elsewhere than on the premises of their owner while not being under the direct charge and control of a competent and responsible person. (This does not include livestock that are allowed under provincial permit to graze on crown land.)

Small livestock means poultry, rabbit or other small animals similar in size and weight but does not include farmed fur bearing animals.

2. Regulations
2.1 Subject to the requirements of the Farm Practices Protection Act:

2.1.1 On parcels of less than 400 m2 in area, keeping of livestock, small livestock or farmed fur bearing animals shall not be
permitted.

2.1.2 On parcels greater than 400m2 and less than 1,500 m2 in area, keeping of animals shall be limited to 5 small livestock. Roosters shall not be kept on parcel of this size.

2.1.3 On parcels greater than 1,500 m2 and less than 2,500 m2 in area keeping of animals shall be limited to 5 small livestock. Roosters shall be kept inside sound resistant buildings between 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m.

2.1.4 On parcels greater than 2,500 m2 and less than 5,000 m2 in area, keeping of animals shall be limited to 25 small livestock. Roosters shall be kept inside sound resistant buildings between 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m.

2.1.5 On parcels greater than 5,000 m2 and less than 1 hectare in area, keeping of animals shall be limited to 1 livestock and 25 small livestock per 5,000 square meters of lot area.

2.1.6 On parcels 1 hectare or greater and less than 2 hectares in area, keeping of animals shall be limited to 5 livestock and 100 small livestock per hectare (10,000 square meters) of lot area.

2.1.7 On parcels 2 hectares or greater and less than 4 hectares in area keeping of animals shall be unlimited but shall not constitute intensive agriculture as defined

   400 m2 = 0.098842153 acres
  1500 m2 = 0.370658072 acres
  2500 m2 = 0.617763454 acres
  5000 m2 = 1.235526907 acres
10,000 m2 = 2.471053815 acres
 m = acres online calculator

1 hectare = 2.47105 acre
2 hectare = 4.94210 acre
3 hectare = 7.41316 acre
4 hectare = 9.88421 acre
hectares = acres online calculator

3. Enforcement
3.1 The inspector may enter any property at any reasonable time concerning any matter under this Bylaw.

3.2 Any person who breaches any provision of this Bylaw commits an offence and is liable upon conviction to the penalties provided under the Offence Act.

 

You can find the Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal Control Bylaw #880 at the link or click on the bylaw directly below.

.pdf icon Animal Control Bylaw No. 880, 2000 - Repeals Bylaw No. 398

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Can RDCO regulate rabbits? Doesn't RDCO have "Broad Power"

.pdf icon Regulatory Best Practices Guide (304 KB) was written to encourage the best possible use of municipal regulatory authority in relation to broad spheres of jurisdiction outlined in the Community Charter. (from page 10 of 36)

Animals – Pre- and Post-Charter

Another example is in relation to animals. Under Division 1 of Part 22 of the Local Government Act, there was no specific power to regulate cats because the regulation of cats was not specified. However, under Section 8 of the Community Charter, there is a broad power to regulate animals and an animal is defined so as to include cats.

Therefore, the broad power to regulate animals has expanded the power to regulate certain kinds of animals not mentioned in the Local Government Act.

http://www.cscd.gov.bc.ca/lgd/gov_structure/community_charter/services_regulatory/regulatory_guide.htm

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Local Government Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 323
This Act is Current to September 28, 2011

Part 1 — Purposes, Principles and Interpretation
Application of Community Charter definitions
5.1 Unless a term is otherwise defined in this Act or a contrary intention appears in this Act, the definitions in the Community Charter apply to this Act.

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Community Charter
[SBC 2003] CHAPTER 26
Schedule
This Act is Current to September 28, 2011

Definitions and Rules of Interpretation

"animal" means any member of the animal kingdom, other than a human being;

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Plants, fish, birds, insects, reptiles, mammals, and human beings are all animals according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Dogs, Cats and Human beings are all mammals according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary

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Rogue peacock patrols UBC's Okanagan campus
CBC News - Thursday, June 24, 2010

Petey the peacock has been patrolling the UBC Okanagan campus in Kelowna for several weeks. (Jackie Sharkey/CBC)
A rogue peacock has been strutting his stuff at the University of British Columbia's Okanagan campus, but nobody seems to know where he came from or who's responsible for making sure he comes to no harm.

The fully grown male bird has caught the attention of students and staff alike, who generally agree that he's a lively addition to the Kelowna campus.

Petey, as he has been named, has been patrolling the grounds for a couple of weeks, creating quite a spectacle for students like Luke Allinson.

"I just walked out of my dorm one day to take out my recycling and bam, it was right there."

Student Adam Goodwin said the colourful bird is a welcome addition.

"I think it's really quite delightful that there's just a peacock, wandering around the campus," said Goodwin.

Origin unclear

But no one's taking responsibility for the rogue bird, and some students like Ranjan Dutta are worried someone might actually be plucking its beautiful feathers.

"It's quite obvious. Like on this side of the lower ones, you see so many eyes there. But on the other side there's none. So I wonder if somebody has plucked it," said Dutta.

Dutta said it's beautiful to have the majestic bird on campus, but it may be endangered by its own roguish nature.

"The threat is that the bird will hurt somebody when it's scared.… He's kind of guarding that door and an animal that is scared is very dangerous to the public and itself," Dutta said.

Assistant grounds manager Al King said he thinks the bird belongs to a nearby farmer.

"He really likes to get around. This week I'm going to play over here … next week, who knows where he's going to go. I've seen him almost everywhere," King said.

The authorities don't seem too concerned. The SPCA said it knows about Petey, and has reported him to the provincial conservation officers, who say the peacock is a domestic animal, so it's not their jurisdiction.

Officials with the Regional District of Central Okanagan said they regulate game birds, but it's not their job to collect them if they run astray.

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Chilliwack BC Peafowl Bylaw

Livestock or poultry cannot be kept in residential areas.

“pet” means any domesticated animal other than livestock or poultry kept within a
residence or on real property for other than commercial purposes;
“poultry” means any fowl including a chicken, turkey, duck, goose, swan or peafowl but
excluding a bird commonly kept indoors;

Click both links to read about Chilliwack's bylaw in regards to peafowl.

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Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal Control Bylaw

At the present time, RDCO claim their animal control bylaw does not include peafowl although RDCO's Animal Control Bylaw #880 says the following:

 Small livestock means poultry, rabbit or other small animals similar in size and weight but does not include farmed fur bearing animals.

Then there is another section of RDCO's Animal Control Bylaw that reads:

2. Regulations
2.1 Subject to the requirements of the Farm Practices Protection Act:

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DISTRICT OF MISSION DOG LICENSING AND ANIMAL CONTROL AND IMPOUNDING BYLAW 1782-1988

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRODUCED FOR CONVENIENCE ONLY and is a consolidation of "District of Mission Dog Licensing and Animal Control and Impounding Bylaw 1782-1988" with the amending bylaws:

3105-1997-1782(15)
f) "poultry" means any fowl including a chicken, turkey, duck, goose, swan or peafowl but excludes a bird commonly kept indoors;

*Note: this is only a snippet, slick link above for entire content.

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3) Worm your flock regularly. Use Tramisol (1/4 teaspoon per gallon of water) or Ivomec & Panacur. Ivomec is given at a dosage per adult bird of cc per bird. Panacur is dosed at 1/10 cc per 2 pounds or approximately cc per bird.

Worm your birds once a month. A liquid dewormer is applied to the birds drinking water.

Eggs can be left with the mother or artificially incubated. If eggs are removed, the female will continue to lay more eggs until her clutch reaches 12 eggs or she maxes out at 28 eggs for the year.

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Meanings in the table below
Federal MBCA - The Migratory Birds Convention Act
CWS - Canadian Wildlife Service (can't find it on the web)

The information below came by email on June 8th and June 9, 2011

To North Westsider:

Peacocks are not classified as wildlife under the Wildlife Act so we have no jurisdiction over them. They are not covered under the federal MBCA either, so CWS has no jurisdiction over them either. They are an alien species introduced either as pets, for wildlife viewing or by agriculturalists. They have proven to be invasive where people who acquired them on private land have released them and let them form feral flocks. This always seems to bring complaints, especially with noise. The only thing the Wildlife Act covers is that it makes it illegal to transplant any non-native species (for just this reason, to try to stop spreading them).

Fish, Wildlife and Habitat Management

--------------------------------------------------------

From: Conservation Officer Service CSD:EX
Sent: Wednesday, June 8, 2011 2:34 PM
To: North Westsider
Cc: Fish and Wildlife ENV:EX
Subject: RE: Question

To North Westsider:

I have forwarded your email to Fish and Wildlife staff who may be able to assist you. This is not something that COS is involved in.

Regards
Dave Jevons | Division Initiatives Manager
Conservation Officer Service | Ministry of Environment

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The Local Government Act applies more to Regional Districts.  The Community Charter applies more to Municipalities like the City of Kelowna.

Local Government Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 323
Division 1 — Regulation of Animals
Application in relation to regional district animal control service

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Community Charter
[SBC 2003] CHAPTER 26
Division 6 — Animal Control

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Goose Population Control Program

The Okanagan Valley Goose Management program is preparing for its fifth year of egg addling to control the number of Canada geese in public spaces.

Trained contractors have begun searching for nesting sites and hope to complete the addling program by the end of April.

“Last year, field crews located and addled 1,269 eggs between Vernon and Osoyoos,” said Project Co-ordinator Kate Hagmeier. “The multi-year project aims to reduce the population of resident Canada geese to a more manageable level, and reduce large concentrations of geese in heavily used public areas. Due to the longevity of geese, it is expected to take three to five years to see a reduction in the Okanagan goose population from egg addling.”

Egg addling involves shaking eggs or coating them with non-toxic 100 per cent biodegradable food-grade corn oil within 14 days of incubation to make them non-viable. The U.S. Humane Society considers egg addling during this time to be humane.

Once addled, the eggs are returned to the nest. Geese continue to incubate until they realize the eggs will not hatch. At this point, it is generally too late in the year to produce more eggs. Adults are not harmed and will continue with their regular life cycle after the nesting season.

During the past four seasons, approximately 5,000 eggs have been prevented from hatching through this minimally invasive approach. This program also entails a nest locating program and goose population surveys.

The public is asked to keep away from goose nests and to avoid touching the eggs; a special permit is required to perform egg addling. An egg addling permit has been secured from the federal government allowing crews from EBB Environmental Inc. and Wise Wildlife Control to addle goose eggs on public and private lands with the owner’s permission. Public assistance is requested by reporting nest locations on private or public land. Email coordinator "at" okanagangooseplan.com or call 1-877-943-3209. Information about the program is available at okanagangooseplan.com

Interior Health continues to encourage local governments throughout the Okanagan to reduce the risk of recreational water contamination from sources such as geese. A swimming notification program was implemented by Interior Health in 2006. Since then, no beach advisories have had to be issued due in part to the combination of activities to protect beaches and beach water areas.

The Okanagan Valley Goose Management Program is a partnership between the City of Kelowna, Central Okanagan Regional District, Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen, District of West Kelowna, City of Vernon, City of Penticton, District of Lake Country, Town of Osoyoos, Town of Oliver, District of Peachland, District of Summerland and Glenmore Ellison Irrigation District.

(April 19, 2011)

Source:  RDCO What's New

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.pdf icon June 9, 2011 Regional District of Central Okanagan Special Board Meeting Agenda

There was nothing mentioned in the Agenda (.pdf) about the peafowl, but the peafowl were mentioned in the audio of the Regional Board Meeting Agenda at the end of the audio tape

You can hear on the audio that the Regional Board carried a motion to investigate who is responsible for feral peafowl when RDCO is responsible.. that is is how smart our board members are.

Apparently there were 9 people who talked to COW Director Jim Edgson saying they wanted the peacocks to roam freely around the subdivision.  There was someone else who wanted to complain about the peafowl running around loose to wander on other people's property, but RDCO refused to return their call.  Another person who does not reside at the subdivision but who has a vacation property at the subdivision, and who most likely doesn't want the peafowl on their property wasn't able to be informed about the meeting and probably still doesn't even know there was a meeting.

---------------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio June 9, 2011 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting .mp3 (25 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files June 9, 2011 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about the Board looking into who has authority to regulate feral peafowl - .wma (1.60 MB)

.pdf icon June 9, 2011 Regional District of Central Okanagan Special Board Meeting Minutes

Director items were added to the agenda

7. DIRECTOR ITEMS

a) Peacocks in Rural Area
Director Hodge noted that he has received a concern from a resident in the Valley of the Sun regarding peacocks at-large and questioned what the rules are with regard to this issue. Staff noted that they are aware of the concerns raised by the resident, that there is only one complainant from the area, and that other residents in the area have either contacted the Regional District or the Director directly expressing no concern.

HODGE/RULE
THAT staff be directed to forward a letter to the Conservation Officer to clarify if there is any rule/legislation in regards to peacocks at-large in a rural area.

CARRIED

There is only one sane resident living at Valley of the Sun in our opinion, the other residents don't care if dogs bark for 6 hours at a time and they don't seem to care about peacocks making so much noise and leaving shit everywhere!  They also don't seem to care about listening to roosters at 5am either.  The people of Valley of the Sun would like to see their tax dollars wasted on feral abandoned peacocks that populate like wildfire after they become a bigger problem.. just like the bunny problem in Kelowna... nobody cares until its too late.  It is beyond us why 34 feral peacocks running around and populating in a subdivision are not a problem?

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Pesky peacocks continue to roam Surrey neighbourhood
Frank Luba, The Province: Thursday, February 25, 2010

Some residents in the Surrey neighbourhood of 150th Street and 62nd Avenue aren't too happy with their guests — a flock of peacocks that are roosting on the rooftops of their homes.

Peacocks aren’t a problem for some residents of the Surrey neighbourhood where the beautiful but noisy birds have taken up residence.

But the private company called in to look at them is.

Chetan Tamber, a resident of 149A Street, doesn’t mind the birds, a flock of peacocks and peahens known collectively as “peafowl.”

Tamber says that when he and several neighbours were out Tuesday afternoon watching an employee of Pigeon Patrol, the animal-control worker trespassed on his front lawn.

“He came up to us and said, ‘I can do what I want, I am going to capture those peacocks’ — and then he started swearing,” Tamber says.

Tamber also said the man then switched his speech to a derisive East Indian accent.

“The Pigeon Patrol guy needs to apologize to us all for what he did,” said Tamber. “This has gone beyond the peacocks. This has become a personal issue.”

Pigeon Patrol did not respond to a request for an interview, but did send an email reading: “There is no story, we were just dropping off netting to the spca, surrey at this address.

“We have not been contracted by the city or spca, surrey to capture any birds. We did not touch any or [sic] the peacocks or ruffle any feathers.”

Rick Bamford, senior bylaw officer with Surrey, confirmed that the company was not hired by the city. He said Pigeon Patrol was consulted by the city for advice on how to deal with the birds, which weigh six to eight kilograms.

Bamford said animal-control officers were not at the immediate scene when the alleged confrontation took place.

“We’re still in the process of determining what happened,” he said.

While some neighbours like the birds, others object.

“We have a number of complaints from neighbours [who] are saying ‘Enough is enough,’” said Bamford.

In addition to roosting and defecating on roofs and porches, the birds’ calls can be deafening — particularly as the weather warms up.

Because the birds are being fed, according to Bamford, he’s worried about that attracting pests like rats.

“They can be quite aggressive,” he said of the male birds. “They’re rounding up their harems and they’re extremely protective.”


The birds’ presence in the neighbourhood predates the new subdivisions that have sprung up recently.

They are not native, but it has yet to be determined exactly how they came to live in the area.

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Prowling Peacocks

Written by Dr. Rob Fergus

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) are large impressive birds native to south Asia. It is the national bird of India, and justifiably famous around the world for the male’s colorful blue plumage and impressive spread tail displays. They are popularly maintained as a semi-domesticated poultry species adding ambiance to large parks and estates in towns and cities across the United States and around the world. While peafowl are attractive, they need a lot of room and are hard to keep from roaming—which is why they can appear as escapees just about anywhere. Wild flocks have even become established in some places, including Arcadia and Palos Verdes, California, the foothills of the Toquima mountains in central Nevada, parts of Florida including Coconut Grove and Longboat Key, and on Oahu, Hawaii.

Peafowl can be a problem if they show up to roost in your trees or feed on your flower beds. When this happens, the first thing to determine is if these are escaped birds—in which case their owners need to be contacted so they can remove and make reparations for any damages done by their livestock. If the birds are part of a feral population, then your local government may have policies or plans in place for how to deal with the birds.

But what to do if you can’t find an owner for the birds or your town doesn’t have a plan for dealing with these strays? The city of Arcadia, CA has a large free-roaming peacock population, and publishes a great pamphlet on how to deter peacocks from your property. They recommend trimming trees that the birds may like to roost in, using sprinklers to chase the birds away, and removing or netting the plants that peacocks like to eat.

If relandscaping your yard isn’t an attractive option for you, you may be able to deter peafowl from spending time in your yard with an automatic sprinkler system like Bird-B-Gone’s Scarecrow. You can deploy these scarecrows to blast the birds with a stream of water any time they come into your yard. Just make sure to turn them off before you go out to do your own yard work!

Another option is to spray the area where the birds are feeding with non-toxic goose repellent. Made from a safe grape extract that many birds avoid, it may be able to keep the peafowl from eating all your plants.

These measures can also work to deter roaming bands of Wild Turkeys, which are an even more common sight than free-roaming peafowl. So give these techniques a try as your first line of defense if you have peacocks or Wild Turkeys show up and start munching on your yard.

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Feed your peacocks a mixture of chicken pellets and mixed grains (barley, wheat, rice) corn feed is also acceptable. You might want to add some dog food (for larger dogs) into the mix. They love all fruits and vegetables and will eat any and nearly all of your human table scraps. Do not give them small bones, as they may choke.

Be sure the cage is large enough for a male to strut (display his tail feathers) and fly around. Provide high perches in each part of the coop.

Watch for predators such as foxes and raccoons. These can possibly kill your peacocks and eat their eggs.

If you have a nesting female, provide a large, clean tire with the middle filled with straw. This should be placed within the wooden shelter. She will lay her eggs there. If you don't provide this, she will just lay them on the floor where they can be stepped on or eaten by wandering predators.

When entering the coop, watch and be sure your peacocks do not get out. Carry a broomstick if you must. Get a lock that unlocks without using a key, and locks behind you as you close the door. If your peacocks get lose, they will likely fly into a tree or away completely. They may also begin running with flocks of wild turkeys, as they are close cousins of the peacock.

KEEP THEM WARM! I cannot stress this enough! Peacocks are not used to freezing temperatures! (Peacocks are very hardy, and do well in cold climates if allowed shelter out of the wind.)

Do not startle your peacocks. They are very jumpy birds, and may injure themselves by flying into the walls of ceilings of their enclosures repeatedly.

Please note that these birds mate for life. If their mate dies, they will not mate again.

Peacocks' loud calls are a problem if kept in urban areas.

Peahens are very susceptible to fox attacks, especially if looking after chicks. The males are better able to defend themselves and will readily fly into trees, hence there is often an excess of male peacocks compared with peahens.

Since they rarely have their wings clipped, you may want to keep your peacock in a large coop.

Avoid feeding chocolate, coffee or alcohol to your peacocks as these can be toxic.

Although peacocks can be kept with common chickens, blackhead, caused by a germ that is transmitted with roundworms, is common in peacocks kept with them. It is preferable to house the two species separately.

Avoid access to metallic objects such as coins, toys, nails, solder or loose wire.

Do not keep two male peacocks in the same coop. They can and will fight with one another, and death is the common outcome of these fights.

Source: WikiHow

Pretty interesting isn't it?

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Wildlife Act
Designation and Exemption Regulation
[includes amendments up to B.C. Reg. 56/2011, April 1, 2011]

Exemption from section 34 of the Act for certain birds

11.3 (1) A person is exempt from section 34 of the Wildlife Act with respect to possessing, taking, injuring, molesting or destroying a bird or its egg or a nest occupied by a bird or its egg if the bird is not designated as wildlife, a threatened species or an endangered species.

(2) Despite subsection (1), a person is exempt from section 34 of the Wildlife Act with respect to taking, injuring, molesting or destroying a bird or its egg or a nest occupied by a bird or its egg if the bird is listed in Schedule C.

[en. B.C. Reg. 253/2000, App. 2, s. 7; am. B.C. Reg. 132/2002, s. (a).]

http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/13_168_90#section11.3

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Wildlife Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 488
This Act is current to June 1, 2011

Birds, nests and eggs

34 A person commits an offence if the person, except as provided by regulation, possesses, takes, injures, molests or destroys

(a) a bird or its egg,

(b) the nest of an eagle, peregrine falcon, gyrfalcon, osprey, heron or burrowing owl, or

(c) the nest of a bird not referred to in paragraph (b) when the nest is occupied by a bird or its egg.

Retrieval of wildlife killed

http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/00_96488_01#section34

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34 Peacocks at Valley of the Sun

Someone told us they counted 34 peafowl at Valley of the Sun one day.  We were told that there was a gentleman who has passed away now, who first brought the peafowl to Valley of the Sun years ago, and that the peafowl were hanging out at Ewings Landing and on Crown Land behind Valley of the Sun.  Back in 2003 it seemed like there were only a couple peafowl running around, but in the last couple of years since the Terrace Mountain fire, the peafowl have populated and there are so many we can't count them all because they are not all in one place at one time.  They are scattered throughout Valley of the Sun.  The peacocks wander checking on the peahens who sit on their eggs for 28 days before their eggs hatch.  A peahen can lay up to 7 eggs.  Maybe the peafowl came down from the hills behind Valley of the Sun due to the Terrace Mountain fire?  There are also a couple properties who do own peacocks at Valley of the Sun.

Here is a short audio clip of what the peafowl sound like. They squawked for 40 minutes on one audio tape we taped on May 19, 2011.  They squawk lots during mating season, and can squawk lots most of the summer.  Click the link to hear what they sound like. (.wma 328kb)

Regional District of Central Okanagan Letters Patent asking permission from the BC Government to control animals.

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.pdf icon LP DIV XXVII 1988 Animal Control Apr 7.pdf

AND WHEREAS the Regional Board of the Regional District of Central Okanagan has requested that the regional district be empowered to undertake the function of animal control:

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Please note that the Local Government Act may have changed since this information was posted, so please check the latest version of the Local Government Act for up to date info

Local Government Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 323
This Act is Current to May 18, 2011

 

Part 1 — Purposes, Principles and Interpretation

Purposes of this Act

1 The purposes of this Act are

(a) to provide a legal framework and foundation for the establishment and continuation of local governments to represent the interests and respond to the needs of their communities,

(b) to provide local governments with the powers, duties and functions necessary for fulfilling their purposes, and

(c) to provide local governments with the flexibility to respond to the different needs and changing circumstances of their communities.





Purposes of regional districts

2 Recognizing that regional districts are an independent, responsible and accountable order of government within their jurisdiction, the purposes of a regional district include

(a) providing good government for its community,

(b) providing the services and other things that the board considers are necessary or desirable for all or part of its community,


(c) providing for stewardship of the public assets of its community, and

(d) fostering the current and future economic, social and environmental well-being of its community.




Principles for governmental relations

3 The relationship between regional districts and the Provincial government in relation to this Act is based on the following principles:

(a) cooperative relations between the Provincial government and regional districts are to be fostered in order to efficiently and effectively meet the needs of the citizens of British Columbia;

(b) regional districts need the powers that allow them to draw on the resources required to fulfill their responsibilities;

(c) notice and consultation is needed for Provincial government actions that directly affect regional district interests;

(d) the Provincial government recognizes that different regional districts and their communities have different needs and circumstances and so may require different approaches;

(e) the independence of regional districts is balanced by the responsibility of the Provincial government to consider the interests of the citizens of British Columbia generally.

 

Broad interpretation

4 (1) The powers conferred on regional districts and their boards under this Act must be interpreted broadly in accordance with the purposes of this Act and in accordance with regional district purposes.

(2) If

(a) an enactment confers a specific power on a regional district or board in relation to a matter, and

(b) the specific power can be read as coming within a general power conferred under this Act,

the general power must not be interpreted as being limited by that specific power, but that aspect of the general power that encompasses the specific power may only be exercised subject to any conditions and restrictions established in relation to the specific power.



Part 22 — Miscellaneous Powers


Repealed

702 [Repealed 1997-25-127.]


Division 1 — Regulation of Animals


Application in relation to regional district animal control service

702.1 This Division applies only to a regional district that provides a service referred to in section 797.1 (1) (b) [animal control].


Animal control authority

703 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the board may, by bylaw, do one or more of the following:

(a) regulate or prohibit the keeping of dogs, horses, cattle, sheep, goats, swine, rabbits or other animals and define areas in which they may be kept or may not be kept;

(b) require that the owner, possessor or harbourer of a dog, or any class of dog, must keep it, as the bylaw directs,

(i) effectively muzzled while at large or on a highway or public place, or

(ii) on leash or under control of a competent person while on a highway or public place.

(2) For the purpose of subsection (1), "other animals" does not include any animal that the board did not have authority to regulate in respect of, or prohibit the keeping of, under section 703 as it read immediately before its re-enactment by the Community Charter Transitional Provisions, Consequential Amendments and Other Amendments Act, 2003.

(3) Without limiting subsection (1) (a), a bylaw under that provision may regulate the keeping of dogs by requiring persons who own, possess or harbour a dog to hold a licence for the dog.

(4) A bylaw referred to in subsection (3) may

(a) require a separate dog licence for each dog, and

(b) vary the amount of the fee according to the sex, age, size or breed of the dog.

(5) A dog licence issued under this section is for the calendar year in which the licence is issued.

(6) If a fee is imposed for a dog licence, the board may, by bylaw,

(a) provide for the payment of compensation, on a scale set out in the bylaw, to the owner of any domestic animal that is killed or injured by a dog over the age of 4 months, the owner of which is unknown and, after diligent inquiry, cannot be found, and

(b) provide for the maximum sum that is available in any one year for the purposes of compensation under this subsection.


Repealed

704–706 [Repealed 2003-52-315.]


Animal pounds

707 The board may, by bylaw, do one or more of the following:

(a) provide for the seizure, impounding and detention of

(i) unlicensed dogs, and

(ii) animals referred to in section 703 (1) (a) that are unlawfully at large;

(b) establish, maintain and operate facilities as pounds;

(c) regulate and establish the fines and fees, including damages for trespassing on private property, to be levied and collected by pound keepers;

(d) provide for the sale or destruction of animals impounded if the fines, fees and other charges are not paid within a reasonable time.

 

Specific regulatory and other powers

797.1 (1) If a board establishes any of the following services, the indicated provisions apply in relation to the service:

(a) in relation to building inspection, Division 2 [Regional District Building Regulations] of Part 21;

(b) in relation to animal control, Division 1 [Regulation of Animals] of Part 22;

(c) in relation to the control of the deposit and removal of soil and the control of the deposit of other materials, section 723;

(d) in relation to the control of pollution, nuisances, pests, noxious weeds, noise, unsightly premises, unwholesome or noxious materials, odours and disturbances, sections 724 [noise control], 725 [nuisances and disturbances] and 728 [fireworks];

(e) in relation to the regulation of fire alarm systems and security alarm systems, section 726;

(f) in relation to the numbering of buildings, section 728.1 [house numbering].

(2) [Repealed 2004-35-88.]

(3) Despite section 182 [prohibition against providing assistance to business], a regional district may operate the service of

(a) providing capital financing for services provided by a telephone, natural gas or electric power utility, or

(b) the giving of grants to an applicant for a business promotion scheme under section 215 [business improvement areas] of the Community Charter in relation to a mountain resort.

(4) A board may, by bylaw, establish the service of the regulation, storage and management of municipal solid waste and recyclable material, including the regulation of facilities and commercial vehicles used in relation to these matters.

(4.1) For the purposes of subsection (4), "municipal solid waste" and "recyclable material" have the same meaning as in the Environmental Management Act.

(5) If a board adopts a bylaw under subsection (4), the board has and must exercise its authority in accordance with the Environmental Management Act and regulations under that Act.

(6) Any bylaw under section 4 (1) (b) [powers of regional park district] of the Park (Regional) Act that is in effect on the date of repeal of that Act is deemed to be a bylaw of the regional district in which the regional park or regional trail is located.

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.pdf icon Regulatory Best Practices Guide (304 KB) was written to encourage the best possible use of municipal regulatory authority in relation to broad spheres of jurisdiction outlined in the Community Charter. (from page 10 of 36)

Animals – Pre- and Post-Charter

Another example is in relation to animals. Under Division 1 of Part 22 of the Local Government Act, there was no specific power to regulate cats because the regulation of cats was not specified. However, under Section 8 of the Community Charter, there is a broad power to regulate animals and an animal is defined so as to include cats.

Therefore, the broad power to regulate animals has expanded the power to regulate certain kinds of animals not mentioned in the Local Government Act.

http://www.cscd.gov.bc.ca/lgd/gov_structure/community_charter/services_regulatory/regulatory_guide.htm

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Please note that the Community Charter may have changed since this information was posted, so please check the latest version of the Local Government Act for up to date info

Community Charter
[SBC 2003] CHAPTER 26
This Act is Current to May 18, 2011

Part 2 — Municipal Purposes and Powers


Division 1 — Purposes and Fundamental Powers

Fundamental powers

8 (1) A municipality has the capacity, rights, powers and privileges of a natural person of full capacity.

(2) A municipality may provide any service that the council considers necessary or desirable, and may do this directly or through another public authority or another person or organization.

(3) A council may, by bylaw, regulate, prohibit and impose requirements in relation to the following:

(a) municipal services;

(b) public places;

(c) trees;

(d) firecrackers, fireworks and explosives;

(e) bows and arrows, knives and other weapons not referred to in subsection (5);

(f) cemeteries, crematoriums, columbariums and mausoleums and the interment or other disposition of the dead;

(g) the health, safety or protection of persons or property in relation to matters referred to in section 63 [protection of persons and property];

(h) the protection and enhancement of the well-being of its community in relation to the matters referred to in section 64 [nuisances, disturbances and other objectionable situations];

(i) public health;

(j) protection of the natural environment;

(k) animals;

(l) buildings and other structures;

(m) the removal of soil and the deposit of soil or other material.

(4) A council may, by bylaw, regulate and impose requirements in relation to matters referred to in section 65 [signs and other advertising].

(5) A council may, by bylaw, regulate and prohibit in relation to the discharge of firearms.

(6) A council may, by bylaw, regulate in relation to business.

(7) The powers under subsections (3) to (6) to regulate, prohibit and impose requirements, as applicable, in relation to a matter

(a) are separate powers that may be exercised independently of one another,

(b) include the power to regulate, prohibit and impose requirements, as applicable, respecting persons, property, things and activities in relation to the matter, and

(c) may not be used to do anything that a council is specifically authorized to do under Part 26 [Planning and Land Use Management] or Part 27 [Heritage Conservation] of the Local Government Act.

(8) As examples, the powers to regulate, prohibit and impose requirements under this section include the following powers:

(a) to provide that persons may engage in a regulated activity only in accordance with the rules established by bylaw;

(b) to prohibit persons from doing things with their property;

(c) to require persons to do things with their property, to do things at their expense and to provide security for fulfilling a requirement.

(9) A municipality must make available to the public, on request, a statement respecting the council's reasons for adopting a bylaw under subsection (3), (4), (5) or (6).

(10) Powers provided to municipalities under this section

(a) are subject to any specific conditions and restrictions established under this or another Act, and

(b) must be exercised in accordance with this Act unless otherwise provided.

(11) For certainty,

(a) the authority under subsection (2) does not include the authority to regulate, prohibit or impose requirements, and

(b) for the purposes of subsection (3) (a), a service does not include an activity that is merely the exercise of authority to regulate, prohibit or impose requirements and related enforcement.




Spheres of concurrent authority

9 (1) This section applies in relation to the following:

(a) bylaws under section 8 (3) (i) [public health];

(b) bylaws under section 8 (3) (j) [protection of the natural environment];

(c) bylaws under section 8 (3) (k) [animals] in relation to wildlife;

(d) bylaws under section 8 (3) (l) [buildings and other structures] establishing standards that are or could be dealt with by the Provincial building regulations;

(e) bylaws under section 8 (3) (m) [removal and deposit of soil and other material] that

(i) prohibit soil removal, or

(ii) prohibit the deposit of soil or other material, making reference to quality of the soil or material or to contamination.

(2) For certainty, this section does not apply to

(a) a bylaw under section 8 [fundamental powers] that is under a provision not referred to in subsection (1) or is in respect of a matter to which subsection (1) does not apply,

(b) a bylaw that is authorized under a provision of this Act other than section 8, or

(c) a bylaw that is authorized under another Act,

even if the bylaw could have been made under an authority to which this section does apply. 
[A little hard to understand section 9 (2) under Spheres of concurrent authority LOL, you have to really read it, but we don't believe this part applies to peacocks.  If you think it does, please let us know here.]

(3) Recognizing the Provincial interest in matters dealt with by bylaws referred to in subsection (1), a council may not adopt a bylaw to which this section applies unless the bylaw is

(a) in accordance with a regulation under subsection (4),

(b) in accordance with an agreement under subsection (5), or

(c) approved by the minister responsible.

(4) The minister responsible may, by regulation, do the following:

(a) establish matters in relation to which municipalities may exercise authority as contemplated by subsection (3) (a), either

(i) by specifying the matters in relation to which they may exercise authority, or

(ii) by providing that the restriction under subsection (3) only applies in relation to specified matters;

(b) provide that the exercise of that authority is subject to the restrictions and conditions established by the regulation;

(c) provide that the exercise of that authority may be made subject to restrictions and conditions specified by the minister responsible or by a person designated by name or title in the regulation.

(5) The minister responsible may enter into an agreement with one or more municipalities that has the same effect in relation to the municipalities as a regulation that could be made under subsection (4).

(6) If

(a) a regulation or agreement under this section is amended or repealed, and

(b) the effect of the amendment or repeal is that bylaws that previously did not require authorization under subsection (3) would now require that authorization,

those bylaws affected that were validly in force at the time of the amendment or repeal continue in force as if they had been approved by that minister.


Division 2 — Scope of Jurisdiction


Relationship with Provincial laws

10 (1) A provision of a municipal bylaw has no effect if it is inconsistent with a Provincial enactment.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1), unless otherwise provided, a municipal bylaw is not inconsistent with another enactment if a person who complies with the bylaw does not, by this, contravene the other enactment.

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Please note that the Community Charter may have changed since this information was posted, so please check the latest version of the Local Government Act for up to date info

Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 372
This Act is Current to May 18, 2011

Part 1 — Interpretation and Application

Definitions

1 (1) In this Act:

"justice" means a justice as defined in the Offence Act;

"registered veterinarian" means an individual who is authorized under the Veterinarians Act to practise veterinary medicine;

"rules", in relation to the society, include except in section 5 the constitution, bylaws and regulations of the society;

"society" means the society continued under section 3.

(2) For the purposes of this Act, an animal is in distress if it is

(a) deprived of adequate food, water, shelter, ventilation, space, care or veterinary treatment,

(b) injured, sick, in pain or suffering, or

(c) abused or neglected.

(3) For the purposes of this Act, a person responsible for an animal includes a person who

(a) owns an animal, or

(b) has custody or control of an animal.

 

Part 2 — The Society

Application

2 This Act does not apply to wildlife, as defined in the Wildlife Act, that is not in captivity.

 

Corporate duties and obligations

9 (1) The society must

(a) have an address in British Columbia to which all communications and notices may be sent and at which all process may be served, and

(b) file with the Registrar of Companies notice of every change of address within 14 days after the change is made.

(2) Every general meeting of the society must be held in British Columbia.

(3) The society must hold an annual general meeting.

(4) Within 14 days after the annual general meeting, the society must file with the Registrar of Companies

(a) an audited financial statement in the form of

(i) a balance sheet containing general particulars of assets and liabilities, and

(ii) a statement of income and expenditure, and

(b) a list of directors of the society, stating for each director his or her address and date of appointment or election.

(5) In addition to the filings required under subsection (4) (b), on request by the Registrar of Companies, the society must furnish the registrar with particulars of directors of the society.

(6) The society and each of its branches must

(a) maintain a register of members, and

(b) record in it the name and address of every person admitted as a member of the society.

(7) Failure, refusal or neglect by the society to observe or perform a duty or obligation created or imposed by this section or section 8 (4) or (5) is an offence.

(8) If the society commits an offence under subsection (7), it is liable on conviction to a penalty of not more than $100.



Part 3 — Relieving Distress in Animals

Abandoned animals

10.1 (1) In this section, "abandoned animal" includes an animal that

(a) is apparently ownerless,

(b) is found straying,


(c) is found in a rental unit after expiry of the tenancy agreement in respect of the rental unit, or

(d) if a person agreed to care for the animal, is not retrieved from that person within 4 days following the end of that agreement.

(2) If an authorized agent is of the opinion that an animal is an abandoned animal, the authorized agent may take custody of the animal and arrange for food, water, shelter, care and veterinary treatment for it.
 



Disposition of abandoned animals taken into custody

17 If an animal is taken into custody under section 10.1 and

(a) the owner is unknown, the society may destroy, sell or otherwise dispose of the animal after the society has held the animal for a period of at least 4 days, or

(b) the owner is known, the society may destroy, sell or otherwise dispose of the animal 4 days after the society has given notice to the owner in accordance with section 19.



Costs of taking action and proceeds of disposition

20 (1) The owner of an animal taken into custody or destroyed under this Act is liable to the society for the costs incurred by the society under this Act with respect to the animal.

(2) The society may require the owner to pay the costs for which he or she is liable under subsection (1) before returning the animal.

(3) Subject to subsection (4), the society may retain the proceeds of a sale or other disposition of an animal under section 17 or 18.

(4) If the proceeds of a sale or other disposition exceed the costs referred to in subsection (1), the owner of the animal may, within 6 months of the date the animal was taken into custody, claim the balance from the society.

 

Part 4 — General

Aid by police

21 A peace officer must assist the authorized agents of the society in enforcing this or any other law relating to the prevention of cruelty to animals.



Offence

24 (1) A person responsible for an animal who causes or permits the animal to be or to continue to be in distress commits an offence.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply if the distress results from an activity that is carried on in accordance with reasonable and generally accepted practices of animal management.

(3) If a person is convicted of an offence under subsection (1), a justice may, in addition to any other penalty that may be imposed for the offence, prohibit the person from owning or having custody or control of an animal for a period of time specified by the justice.

(4) A justice may make an order under subsection (3) on any terms the justice considers appropriate.

(5) A person who fails to comply with an order made under subsection (3) commits an offence.

 

Animals taken into custody

24.2 Sections 23 to 24.2 of the Offence Act do not apply to an animal taken into custody under this Act.

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One of the BC Government Ministries told us that peacocks are not regulated under the Wildlife Act.

Wildlife Act

"animal" means a mammal, reptile, amphibian or bird;

"bird" means an animal of the class Aves, and its eggs;

"domestic animal" means an animal that is prescribed as a domestic animal;

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Aves - From Wikipedia

Birds (class Aves) are feathered, winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals.

Galliformes—fowl

------------------------------

Galliformes

The galliform bird species with the largest wing-span and largest overall length (including a train of over 6 feet) is most likely the Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus). Most galliform genera are plump-bodied with thick necks and moderately long legs, and have rounded and rather short wings.

Typical peafowl (Pavo), most of the peacock-pheasants (Polyplectron), the Bulwer's Pheasant (Lophura bulweri), the ruffed pheasants (Chrysolophus) and the hill partridges (Arborophila) have narrow, relatively delicate bills, poorly suited for digging. These Galliform genera prefer instead to capture live invertebrates in leaf litter, in sand and in shallow pools or along stream banks. These genera are also outwardly similar in that they each have exceptionally long, delicate legs and toes and the tendency to frequent seasonally wet habitats to forage, especially during chick-rearing. The Blue Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) is famed in its native India for its appetite for snakes – even poisonous cobras – which it dispatches with its strong feet and sharp bill. The Lady Amherst's Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae), Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus), Bulwer's Pheasant and the Crestless Fireback (Lophura erythrophthalma) are notable for their aptitude to forage for crustaceans such as crayfish and other aquatic small animals in shallow streams and amongst rushes in much the same manner as some members of the rail family (Rallidae).

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Wildlife Act Designation and Exemption Regulation - okanaganlakebc.ca doesn't think a peacock is a domestic animal

Domestic animals under section 26 (2) of the Act

8 For the purposes of section 26 (2) of the Wildlife Act the following are domestic animals:

(h) an animal not defined as wildlife in the Wildlife Act or regulations, that is not native to or does not naturally occur within the province and is tame and kept in captivity for the use of man.


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Hunting, trapping and firearm prohibitions

26 (1) A person commits an offence if the person hunts, takes, traps, wounds or kills wildlife

(a) that is an endangered species or threatened species,

(b) in a wildlife sanctuary,

(c) at a time not within the open season,

(d) with a firearm or a bow during the prohibited hours,

(e) by the use or with the aid of a light or illuminating device,

(f) with poison,

(g) with a set gun, or

(h) with a pump, repeating or auto loading shotgun unless the magazine contains a plug that is incapable of removal except by disassembling the gun, and that makes the magazine incapable of holding more than 2 cartridges.

(2) Subsection (1) (c), (d), (e) and (h) does not apply to a person who hunts or traps wildlife that is on the person's property and is a menace to a domestic animal or bird.

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Wildlife Act - Property in wildlife

2 (1) Ownership in all wildlife in British Columbia is vested in the government.

(2) A person does not acquire a right of property in any wildlife except in accordance with a permit or licence issued under this Act or the Game Farm Act or as provided in subsection (3) of this section.


(3) A person who lawfully kills wildlife and complies with all applicable provisions of this Act and the regulations acquires the right of property in that wildlife.

(4) If a person by accident or for the protection of life or property kills wildlife, that wildlife, despite subsection (3), remains the property of the government.

(5) Despite anything in this Act, no right of action lies, and no right of compensation exists, against the government for death, personal injury or property damage caused by

(b) an animal that escapes or is released from captivity or is abandoned

in British Columbia

----------------

Wildlife Act - Release or escape of animals

77 (1) A person who releases or abandons an animal or from whose captivity an animal escapes

(a) is, despite section 11 (4) of the Livestock Act, liable to the government for loss or damage to wildlife or wildlife habitat caused by the animal, and for all costs incurred by the government in pursuing, recovering, holding or destroying it, and

(b) is not entitled to any compensation from the government if the animal is destroyed under section 79.

---------------

Destruction of animals

79 (1) An officer may kill an animal, other than a domestic animal, that is at large and is likely to harm persons, property, wildlife or wildlife habitat.


(2) An officer may kill a dog that is

(a) at large in a wildlife management area, or

(b) at large and harassing wildlife.

(3) An officer may kill a cat at large where wildlife is usually found

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THE NUMBER NOT TO CALL TO REPORT ABANDONED PEACOCKS IS 1-877-952-7277 WHICH IS THE CONSERVATION OFFICER SERVICE or (RAPP) Report All Poachers and Polluters.  CONSERVATION WAS CALLED MAY 30, 2011 IN REGARDS TO ABOUT A DOZEN PEACOCKS AT LARGE AND ABANDONED, THEY TOOK THE INFO, AND THE NEXT DAY THEY SAID THEY DON'T COLLECT PEACOCKS.

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Bylaws on RDCO's Website

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.pdf icon RDCO Development Services Director Dan Plamondon is responsible for the following:
Inspection Section
Responsibility Areas
Business Licenses
Building Inspection & Permits
Paid On-call Fire Departments
Regional Rescue
Dog Control
Noise Bylaw
Smoke Control Bylaw
Untidy Premises
Insect & Weed Control
Sign Bylaw
General Bylaw Enforcement

CONTACT RDCO

.pdf icon 2011 List of RDCO Committee Appointments

.pdf icon Regional District of Central Okanagan Organization and Responsibilities

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.pdf icon R.D.C.O. Consolidated Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw 435.pdf

.pdf icon R.D.C.O Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1266, 2009 - Amends Bylaw No. 435 (in effect Dec 2010)

please check to see if there are newer bylaws implemented since this information was posted Dec 2010

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.pdf icon Animal Control Bylaw No. 880, 2000 - Repeals Bylaw No. 398

.pdf icon Animal Control Extended Service Establishment Bylaw No. 769, 1998

--------------------------------

.pdf icon Prohibited Animal Amendment Bylaw No. 1073, 2004  Amends Bylaw No. 1028

.pdf icon Prohibited Animal Bylaw No. 1028, 2003 - Amended by Bylaw No. 1073

.pdf icon Prohibited Animal Control Service Area Establishment Bylaw No. 1027, 2003

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Local Government Act - Division 1 - Regulation of Animals
Division 1 — Regulation of Animals

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READ PEOPLES COMMENTS ABOUT PEACOCKS

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Some white, blue and green peacocks that were abandoned

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Westside Road Gossip
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Westside Road Gossip
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Adv. Plan Comm. ] Alt. Approval ] Ambulance ] Argo Road ] BC Hydro ] Budget 2010 ] Budget 2011 ] Budget 2012 ] Budget 2013 ] Budget 2014 ] Budget 2015 ] Building Inspection ] Build Laws - BC ] Build Laws - RDCO ] Building Violations ] COW Elect 08 ] COW Elect. 11 ] Director Edgson ] Dogs ] Easement Roads ] EDC ] Elect. Boundary ] Environ. Advisory ] ESS ] Finance ] Fintry Develop ] Fintry Park ] Fire Boat ] Fire Bylaws ] Fire Dept. ] Fire Dept FOI ] Fire Hydrants ] Fire Minutes ] Fires House ] FOI Act ] Friends Fintry ] Garbage ] Garbage Area ] Garbage Bylaws ] Garb Comment 08 ] Garbage Contract ] Garbage Finance ] Garbage FOI ] Garbage FOI ] Garbage La Casa ] Garbage Locker ] Garbage Minutes ] Garbage NOWESI ] Garbage Ombudsman ] Garbage Questionaire ] Garbage Secret ] Garbage Solution ] Garbage Survey ] Garbage Traders ] Governance Wide ] Government ] Helicopters ] History ] Killiney Hall ] Killiney Park ] La Casa ] Motorized Rec. ] NW OCP ] NWCA ] NWCA FOI ] NW Parks ] OKIB ] OKIB Logging ] OKIB Road ] OKIB Tax ] Peacocks ] Police Tax ] Property Tax ] RDCO ] RDCO Dog Minutes ] RDCO Jokes ] RDCO Policy ] RDCO Regs ] Report Animals ] Septic Systems ] Subdiv. History ] T. Mtn After Fire ] Terrace Mnt. Fire ] Trench Burner ] Vote Box ] Water Budget 08 ] Water Budget 09 ] Water Budget 10 ] Water Bylaws ] Water Construct ] Water FOI ] Water Grants ] Water Judgements ] Water Laws ] Water Meters ] Water Minutes ] Water Rates ] Water Right-of-Way ] Water Survey ] Water System ] Water VOS ] Water VOS Pics ] Water Well Data ] Water Wells ] Westside Road ] WR Development ] WR Incorporation ] WR Overpass ] WRIC ] Zoning Bylaw 66 ] Zoning Bylaw 1981 ] Zoning Bylaw 871 ]

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Gossip
In Other Towns

INDEX ALL ] Boucherie Rd ] Kaleden ] Kelowna ] Naramata ] Oyama ] Peachland ] Penticton ] Summerland ] Vernon ] West Kelowna ] Westside Road ] Winfield ]

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Index

Boucherie Road ] Kaleden ] Kelowna ] Naramata ] Oyama ] Peachland ] Pentiction ] Summerland ] Vernon ] West Kelowna ] Westside Road ] Winfield ]

You will find Okanagan B.C. businesses, services, classifieds, local arts and crafts, vacation rentals, plus much more located in communities around Okanagan Lake.  We will be adding to this site, so come back and check it often.  Lots of gossip, photos, and much more.

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