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Regional District of Central Okanagan

DOG CONTROL MINUTES YEAR 2012 - 2017

This webpage is not the official website of the Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO).  This webpage and subsequent webpages are made up of information we found on the net about dogs in the Regional District of Central Okanagan, including agenda and minutes plus audio clips of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Board Meetings.

This webpage is made up of old and new.  We usually try to post in date order, newest at the top and we don't remove info.  Please know that bylaws and laws change regularly.  Sometimes we don't keep up with posting the newest laws, so make sure you check the latest consolidated bylaws on RDCO's website and/or the BC laws website, if you are concerned about this.  By reading below you will find out what dog bylaws or laws you can look for on RDCO's website and what laws there are in regards to dogs that we found on the BC Laws website and elsewhere.  Note: Don't use RDCO's search feature, it doesn't work worth a u know what.  Google will find info on RDCO's website for you much better.  Much of what is on RDCO's website is also posted on okanaganlakebc.ca, including stats you may not find on RDCO's website.  We tried to consolidate as much information as we can find on this webpage and subsequent pages to help inform you.

The Regional District of Central Okanagan Bylaw Enforcement Department provides dog control services for the entire Regional District. This area includes the City of Kelowna, Districts of West Kelowna, Peachland and Lake Country, as well as the unincorporated Central Okanagan East and Central Okanagan West Electoral Areas of the Regional District that include Ellison, Joe Rich, North Westside, Wilsons Landing, Traders Cove, Trepanier Valley and Brent Road in Peachland.

If you wish to make a comment in regards to RDCO or dogs to be posted to okanaganlakebc.ca here, click the comment form link down a little from here, and fill out the form located near the bottom of this webpage.

RDCO mentioned in the August 22, 2011 Agenda, that RDCO Dog Control Bylaw amendments will be advertised for public input.  Feb 24th, 2014 RDCO passed 3rd reading on its new dog bylaw.

How to find text on this page using:  Internet Explorer | Firefox | Opera |Safari | Google Chrome

COMMENT FORM

Last update January 03, 2018

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CAUTION !

The Regional District of Central Okanagan will only hold your dog for 72 hours before its put out for adoption or maybe put down. 

If you live along Westside Road south of the OKIB reserve, you reside in the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

If you live in the Regional District of Central Okanagan, your dog will be taken to the pound in Kelowna and NOT Vernon. 

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"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated"
--Mahatma Gandhi

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AFTER HOURS DOG CONTROL NUMBER IS NOT PUBLIC

But it is now!!!

FYI RDCO has an after hours dog control number that is not public according to what we were told by the RCMP.

The RCMP told us that RDCO has this 250-469-8686 number that you can call from 6am - 10pm

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IMPORTANT INFO

IN THE REGIONAL DISTRICT OF CENTRAL OKANAGAN YOU NEED AT LEAST TWO PEOPLE TO COMPLAIN ABOUT A BARKING DOG OR THE DOG DOESN'T GET A TICKET, AND IT CAN'T BE TWO PEOPLE FROM THE SAME HOUSEHOLD, BECAUSE THE REGIONAL DISTRICT OF CENTRAL OKANAGAN SAYS THE ADJUDICATOR WILL SAY IT'S A HE SAID SHE SAID NEIGHBORHOOD DISPUTE AND MORE EVIDENCE IS NEEDED.  IF ONLY ONE PERSON IS COMPLAINING, THE RDCO WILL ONLY EDUCATE THE DOG OWNER AND WILL NOT ISSUE A TICKET.

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - the dog bylaw is a living document and amendments can be made - .wma (249 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 16, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - RDCO needs to involve your neighbors about the barking - .wma (900 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 16, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - RCMP can be called for barking dogs at night with RDCO to follow up - .wma (147 KB) You can call the RCMP, but the RCMP tell us that if RDCO won't follow up, which RDCO refused to follow up for us, the RCMP can't do anything and will not attend to barking complaints at night anymore because it wastes the RCMP's time if RDCO will not follow up.  We were told this by the Armstrong RCMP Sgt.

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 22, 2012 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 Consultant Report - Dog Control Service Review and only about barking being the number 1 complaint Item 6.1 Dog Control Service Review - .wma (2.59 MB)

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NEW .pdf icon RDCO's new Responsible Dog Ownership bylaw amendments adopted Oct 13, 2016

click for a larger copy

 

NEW .pdf icon RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw 1326 amendments adopted Oct 13, 2016

click for a larger copy

NEW 2013 - 2014 RDCO Dog Control Resource Group Terms of Reference
From Dec 9, 2013 RDCO Board Meeting Agenda

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New for 2013 dog licensing, dog owners that purchased a Permanent License tag during 2012 can easily renew and pay online at regionaldistrict.com/vdo

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RDCO DOG CONTROL

Gross Operating Cost per Complaint $457.17 in 2010.
(look under the heading "Efficiency" left side nearer the bottom of the page)

Ticket Revenue 2010 =

$14,855

   
Dog License Revenue 2010 =

$277,681

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Zero Tolerance for all dog aggression violations and for failure to have a license.  Include off leash violation which lead to aggression incidents due to lack of owner control. (RDCO Board Agenda Item 10.1 Dog Control Service Review Update page 6)

Zero Tolerance for all dog aggression violations and for failure to have a license.  Include off leash violation which lead to aggression incidents due to lack of owner control.

Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) includes the City of Kelowna, District of West Kelowna, Lake Country, Peachland, Central Okanagan West, Central Okanagan East, Trepanier.

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NEW FEDERAL DOG LAW

Remember that dog on Vancouver Island where the guy punched his dog in the middle of the road and then threw him in the ditch as a couple were driving by and seen the whole thing? Well the couple that saw this are trying to change laws. They are making a law themselves and are presenting it to their MP Jean Crowder. The couple have a page up on the net. They are doing the research of other countries laws and using their wording to make a law for us Federally. Please help support this couple in any way you can. You can sign up and get on the email list. http://www.terryslaw.ca/

This facebook group is affiliated with Terrys Law
https://www.facebook.com/groups/AnimalCrueltyLegislationCanada/

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RDCO Annual Reports 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Dogs Licensed 12,818 16,908      
Dog Complaints          
Dog Complaints & Responses 2,363 2,596   1,793  
Dog Non-Complaint Responses 246 232   315  
Dogs Impounded 685 632      
Dogs Euthanized 83 52   25  
Dog Bylaw Violation Tickets 513        
Dog Bylaw Fines   658   782  

 

RDCO Annual Reports 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Dogs Licensed 10,457 10,487 11,155 12,507 12,818
Dog Complaints 2,164 1,993 2,286 2,857  
Dog Complaints & Responses         2,363
Dog Non-Complaint Responses         246
Dogs Impounded 886 774 774 750 685
Dogs Euthanized 91 108 81 107 83
Dog Bylaw Violation Tickets 401 401 254 552 513
Dog Bylaw Fines          

 

RDCO Annual Reports 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Dogs Licensed 8,793 9,046 9,224 9,476 9,833
Dog Complaints 3,151 2,990 2,892 2,524 2,403
Dog Complaints & Responses          
Dog Non-Complaint Responses          
Dogs Impounded 1,229 1,186 1,111 1,128 874
Dogs Euthanized 306 292 259 219 113
Dog Bylaw Violation Tickets 367 330 324 218 338
Dog Bylaw Fines          

 

From RDCO Annual Reports

click for a larger copy

   2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015

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Regional District of Central Okanagan Dog Control webpage.
1450 K.L.O. Road
Kelowna, B.C.
V1W-3Z4

RDCO Dog Pound
890 Weddell Place
Kelowna, B.C.
(between Richter Street and Gordon Drive)
link to map.pdf

Kelowna Branch of the SPCA
3785 Casorso Road
Kelowna, B.C.
V1W-4M7

NEW RDCO's Bylaw Adjudication Program

NEW Permanent Dog License

RDCO Dog Advisory Committee Agenda
(The Dog Advisory Committee has been disbanded as of 2011 in favour of the new Dog Resource Committee where committee members are not permitted to speak about issues they have but are only allowed to speak about issues RDCO has)

RDCO Dog Advisory Committee Minutes
(The Dog Advisory Committee has been disbanded as of 2011 in favour of the new Dog Resource Committee where committee members are not permitted to speak about issues they have but are only allowed to speak about issues RDCO has)

RDCO finally posted the Dog Advisory Committee Agenda and Minutes to its website end of 2011, but at the end of 2012 the Dog Advisory Committee was disbanded and not replaced.

For 2014 the contact at Kelowna city hall who oversees the by-laws is Greg Wise.

.pdf icon RDCO Dept Organization in 2013

.pdf icon RDCO in Command List for 2013 (first part of 2013)

.pdf icon RDCO in Command List for 2013 (last part of 2013) Now Chief Admin officer is in charge of Dog Control

.pdf icon 2011 List of RDCO Committee Appointments

.pdf icon 2011 Terms of Reference of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Dog Advisory Committee

.pdf icon Regional District of Central Okanagan Organization and Responsibilities

.pdf icon Brian Reardon, Chief Administrative Officer

Responsibility Areas
Corporate Records
Board & Committee Meetings
Administrative Support
Board Support
Interagency Liaison
Communications & Intergovernmental Affairs
Web Site and Social Media
Freedom of Information Act
Elections, Referenda & Alternative Approval Process
Bylaw Enforcement & Bylaw Adjudication Program
Dog Control
Noise Bylaw
Smoke Control Bylaw
Untidy Premises
Insect & Weed Control
Sign Bylaw

 

.pdf icon Dog Control Officer I Job Description

.pdf icon Bylaws on RDCO's Website

Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1266, 2009 - Amends Bylaw No. 435
Click image to read larger print.

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.pdf icon Dog Regulation and Impounding Amendment Bylaw No. 1265, 2009 - Amends Bylaw No. 366

section 32.4 A maintenance fee of $20.00 for each overnight detention.

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.pdf icon RDCO Letters Patent div xxvii Animal Control Apr. 7, 1988

.pdf icon Animal Control Bylaw No. 880, 2000 - Repeals Bylaw No. 398

.pdf icon Animal Control Extended Service Establishment Bylaw No. 769, 1998

--------------------------------

.pdf icon Prohibited Animal Amendment Bylaw No. 1073, 2004  Amends Bylaw No. 1028

.pdf icon Prohibited Animal Bylaw No. 1028, 2003 - Amended by Bylaw No. 1073

.pdf icon Prohibited Animal Control Service Area Establishment Bylaw No. 1027, 2003

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.pdf icon Dog Control Extended Service Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 1017, 2003 - Amends Bylaw No. 425

.pdf icon Dog Control Extended Service Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 733, 1997 - Amends Bylaw No. 425

.pdf icon Dog Control Extended Service Establishment Bylaw No. 425, 1990 - Amended By Bylaw Nos. 733 & 1017

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Local Government Act - Division 1 - Regulation of Animals
Division 1 — Regulation of Animals
702.1 Application in relation to regional district animal control service
703 Animal control authority
704–706 Repealed
707 Animal pounds
707.1 Dangerous dogs

Community Charter
[SBC 2003] CHAPTER 26
Division 6 — Animal Control

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B.C. Livestock Protection Act

B.C. Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act

B.C. Local Government Act

B.C. Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act

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Canine Good Neighbor information on RDCO's website

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KELOWNA - Dog Advisory Committee Recommendations 2003 - if link doesn't work try here

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"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated"
--Mahatma Gandhi

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My goal is to someday be the person my dog thinks I am ~ Author Unknown

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I wonder if I could prevail upon you to post this new SPCA cruelty hotline number on your website please?

I called the Vancouver SPCA to confirm that this is operational in our area, and was told that it is, and they would arrange for someone from this area to attend to a distress situation.

(They need permission to enter the Reserves).

This number should be called if anyone sees a wild or domestic animal suffering, sick, abused, neglected, homeless; deprived of veterinary care, adequate food, water, shelter, space, ventilation, etc.

The call can be anonymous.

ANIMAL CRUELTY HOTLINE: 1 - 855 - 622 - 7722

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October 22, 2012 RDCO Board Meeting the Dog Consultant said that there were no contractors for dog control in the area.  We do know that the following areas choose a contract over in house service:

K9 Control is the contractor for the enforcement of dog control bylaws in the following areas:
City of Vernon
District of Coldstream
Village of Lumby
Electoral Areas ‘B’ and ‘C’
Part of Electoral Area ‘D’ in the Lumby and District Fire Protection Area.
Township of Spallumcheen
City of Enderby and parts of Electoral Area ‘F’
City of Salmon Arm
Parts of Columbia-Shuswap Regional District (CSRD) in Ranchero, Sorrento, Blind Bay and Eagle Bay.


http://dogcontrol.ca/

K9 Dog Control from Vernon does not serve the Westside Road Area.  RDCO Dog Control has in house dog control that serves the North Westside Road area.

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Dog Control Officer's have no training to assess behaviour of our dogs, so why do they alone have absolute power to seize any dog they see fit.  Please join these facebook groups and communities.

THE NOT SO "DANGEROUS" DOGS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Group

THE NOT SO "DANGEROUS" DOGS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Community

DIESEL THE DOG - A STORY OF SECTION 49 ABUSES

and join in the fight to change this piece of crap legislation.


click for larger print

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Tax Requisition for Dog Control vs Actual Revenue and Expense

YEAR / TAX REQUISITION / ACTUAL EXPENSE / REVENUE

2003 (406,707) / 542,816 / (550,397)
2004 (419,288) / 581,193 / (587,790)
2005 (432,816) / 571,475 / (602,542)
2006 (472,583) / 649,116 / (657,810)
2007 (562,889) / 651,642 / (727,095)
2008 (552,884) / 746,144 / (814,975)
2009 (580,166) / 786,428 / (819,897)
2010 (652,592) / 821,366 / (909,204)
2011 (662,138) / 922,810 / (988,017)
2012 (723,860) / 1,070,920 / (1,033,864)
2013 (850,526) / 1,020,359 / (1,095,298)
2014 (861,665) / 1,101,897 / (1,387,509)
2015 BUDGET (768,089) / 1,446,820 / (1,446,820)

Residential Tax Rate for 2013 = 0.0242 (per $1000 of assessment)
Residential Tax Rate for 2014 = 0.0245 (per $1000 of assessment)
Residential Tax Rate for 2015 BUDGET = 0.0207 (per $1000 of assessment)

For more info, click here

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2016 Program Plan Summary (from RDCO Budget Docs)
page 1 of 2


click page for larger copy

 

2016 Program Plan Summary (from RDCO Budget Docs)
page 2 of 2

click page for larger copy

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This is how we tried to deal with our neighbors barking dogs at Valley of the Sun in the Regional District of Central Okanagan, but it did not work for us.  It got our house egged.  No other neighbor wants to complain about the excessive or overnight barking.  RDCO Dog Control will not do anything unless other neighbors also complain.  We have listened to barking for 6 years now.

http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-a-Neighbor's-Dog-from-Barking

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files RDCO Dog Control Consultant said October 22, 2012, that the number 1 complaint in the RDCO about dogs, is barking.

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Facts from RDCO Dog Control Stats from .pdf icon Feb 11, 2016 RDCO Board Agenda Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update.

In 2015 in Central Okanagan West

Licences = 180
Complaints = 33
Impounds = 2

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Poll: increasing the number of dogs to 3

seen on Kelowna Capital News online front page

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BRIAN REARDON the article states:
In residential area's, barking keeps dog control officers busy.  "Often the dog complaints we get have nothing to do with the dog.  People don't get along with their neighbors," said Ellis.

Or how about neighbors ganging up on one neighbor so that all neighbors can walk their dogs off leash or let their dogs run at large, and leave their dog shit laying around.  I would hate to see what would happen if one of them got a barking ticket.  They let their dogs bark for hours and not one of these asswipes at Valley of the Mental Cases have ever received a ticket.

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Consideration sought from dog owners
LETTER: Dogs and owners leaving their mess behind on Okanagan Rail Trail
Vernon Morning Star - Dec. 23, 2017

On CBC’s “Daybreak” program the other morning, there was an item of news that caught my attention. In the Kootenays, there is a trail being constructed from Invermere to Fairmount and apparently it is going to be declared off-limits to dogs. Some of the local dog-owners cannot understand why! One reason given for this ban is that the powers-that-be have heard from the owners of the lands being donated that they have got tired of dealing with off-leash animals worrying other animals, and the high incidence of unpicked-up dog poop. Simply, they do not want dogs on their land, and who can blame them?

Too bad Windermere is so far away! I would love to be able to hike on such a trail, and not have to deal with these problems, which are already spoiling our much-heralded Okanagan Rail Trail. Sadly one cannot walk here with head up admiring the view, as you run the risk if stepping in some undesirable heap on the pathway. More often than not, there is a also a highly-visible line of white plastic bags marking the edge of the trail. I don’t think that dogs are yet capable of pooping into plastic bags by themselves, so obviously the owners have participated, and knowingly parking them there. Can they not read the many signs, and cooperate in keeping this trail hygienic and pleasant for all to use?

Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park is another area where the public’s enjoyment is also being spoiled for many by non-compliant dog owners. Here the problem is more often dogs ranging off-leash.

Many owners do comply, but a large number consider they are exempt. One of the reasons such signs are posted is to protect the natural wildlife whose home this is, but please consider that a lot of people are uncomfortable and nervous when confronted on the trails by an off-leash dog, of any size. Not everybody has the same affection for your dog as you do.
Dog-owners, please be more considerate! If not, you may find a ban being imposed here.

Iain Smith
Vernon

Source: https://www.vernonmorningstar.com/opinion/consideration-sought-from-dog-owners/

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Hot Dogs - Prevent Summertime Pet Fatalities

With temperatures warming up in the Okanagan, the Kelowna RCMP, the Regional District of the Central Okanagan (RDCO) Animal Control and the BC SPCA gathered at Orchard Park Mall today (June 7) for a public awareness campaign on the dangers of leaving pets unattended in hot vehicles.

“Each summer our agencies receive hundreds of emergency calls to rescue dogs whose lives are endangered because they are left in hot cars,” says Sean Hogan, BCSPCA Kelowna Branch manager. “Many well-meaning guardians leave their pets in parked vehicles while they run errands, thinking they will be safe for a short period. Tragically, in hot weather their pets can suffer serious heatstroke and die in a matter of minutes.”

“We make it a priority to respond as quickly as possible, but we would rather see the problem addressed through education and prevention before an animal is put in a potentially fatal situation,” says Kelowna RCMP Cpl. Jesse O’Donaghey.

All three agencies note that each time an officer is dispatched to rescue an animal in a parked car, it stretches resources required for other emergency calls. “This is a preventable problem and we strongly urge all pet guardians to leave their animals at home during hot days,” says RDCO communications officer Bruce Smith.

The temperature in a parked car, even in the shade with windows partly open, can rapidly reach a level that will seriously harm or even kill a pet. In just minutes, the temperature in a parked car can climb to well over 38 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit). Dogs have no sweat glands, so they cool themselves by panting and by releasing heat through their paws. Information Sheet

On summer days the hot air and upholstery in a vehicle can make it impossible for pets to cool themselves. Dogs can withstand high temperatures for only a very short time – usually just 15 to 20 minutes - before suffering irreparable internal organ and brain damage or death.

“If you’re used to letting your pets accompany you on errands, you might feel guilty leaving them behind on hot summer days. But they will be much happier – and safer – at home, with shade and plenty of fresh, cool water,” Hogan says.

What to do if you see a dog in distress in a parked vehicle:

Note the license plate and ask managers of nearby businesses to page the owner to return to their vehicle immediately;
Call for emergency assistance - during the daytime, call the Kelowna SPCA at 250-861-7722 or RCMP (250-762-3300 or 911, depending on the level of animal distress). The Kelowna SPCA will troubleshoot with RCMP and RDCO Animal Control to assist when pets in hot car calls come in. Note: It is illegal for members of the public to break a window to access the vehicle themselves;
Keep emergency supplies - bottled water, a small bowl, a towel that can be soaked in water- in your car so that you help hydrate an animal (if a window has been left open) while you wait for emergency response;
Be an advocate! Help spread the word that pets and hot vehicles are a fatal mix. Contact the BC SPCA for a #HotPetsNotCool decal for your vehicle and download posters and other materials at spca.bc.ca/hotpets to put up in malls and other areas in your community where pets are left unattended in vehicles.
 

Symptoms of heatstroke in pets:

Exaggerated panting (or the sudden stopping of panting)
Rapid or erratic pulse
Salivation
Anxious or staring expression
Weakness and muscle tremors
Lack of coordination, convulsions
Vomiting
Collapse
If your pet shows symptoms of heatstroke:

Immediately move the animal to a cool, shady place
Wet the dog with cool water
Fan vigorously to promote evaporation. This will cool the blood, which reduces the animal’s core temperature
Do not apply ice. This constricts blood flow, which will inhibit cooling.
Allow the animal to drink some cool water (or to lick ice cream if no water is available)
Take the animal to a veterinarian as soon as possible for further treatment

(June 7, 2017)

Source:  RDCO What's New https://www.regionaldistrict.com/whats-new.aspx

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'My Dog Park Finder' Now Available on the 'My Dog Matters App'

Forgot to read the signs when entering a park that allows dogs? Dog owners in the Central Okanagan now have a powerful tool available for their mobile device to keep them informed.

This feature is just one more value-added benefit provided to dog owners in the region.

Dog owners can download the ‘My Dog Matters App’ for free at the Google and iTunes app stores or access it on their desktop computer. If you’re among the close to 5,000 dog owners who’ve already downloaded the App this special feature is available in the most recent update. More information can be found at www.mydogmatters.ca/mdmapp

Communications Officer Bruce Smith says, “Anyone, including visitors to the region, can access the My Dog Park Finder if they download the App. The new feature has information on more than 230 parks that allow dogs in every area of the Central Okanagan including Kelowna, West Kelowna, Lake Country, Peachland and the Regional District’s regional and community parks. It provides the rules in each of these parks such as: on or off leash and dog beach access areas, just in case you miss any signs on your way in.

“Together with Google maps” he says, “the App provides you with directions to any particular dog-friendly park.

The new feature of the App is the result of an exciting collaboration between the Regional District’s innovative Geographical Information Systems team and Socilogica Technologies, the company that developed the My Dog Matters App, which was released earlier this year.

He adds, “This summer our Dog Ambassadors are back and will be providing information about this exciting new feature of the My Dog Matters App along with dog-resource information as they visit parks and high traffic pedestrian areas right across the Central Okanagan. They’re a dog owner’s best friend, there to help residents and non-residents alike by encouraging responsible dog ownership.”

As a reminder to dog owners in the region, the ‘My Dog Matters App’ lets you easily renew your annual license and includes the digital My Dog Matters Reward Card. This card provides the opportunity to receive special discounts at more than 50 participating businesses in the region.

Information about dog licensing and Responsible Dog Ownership in the Central Okanagan is available online, anytime at regionaldistrict.com/dogs.

(June 8, 2017)

Source:  RDCO What's New https://www.regionaldistrict.com/whats-new.aspx

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Fraser Valley had half the money as RDCO for dog control, and FV did 1,139 more dog complaints

We are being rooked badly by RDCO CAO Brian Reardon who is head of Dog Control!!

RDCO Dog Budget 2015 of $1,531,865 is more than double of Fraser Valley 2015 Dog Budget of $744,010 ( x 2 = $1,488,020) and RDCO did over 1,000 less dog complaints than Fraser Valley. See attached 2 documents from Fraser Valley at the links below if you don't believe me, and compare to this page of dog stats we have collected.  Fraser Valley documents "2015 calls for service" and "2015 financial plan"

CAO and staff other than employees, and other financial Chair Gail Given stated at March 27, 2017 RDCO Board meeting is the admin overhead
2017 Budget RDCO admin overhead $178,039
2016 RDCO actual admin overhead $181,237
2015 RDCO actual admin overhead $174,757
2014 RDCO actual admin overhead $165,203
2013 RDCO actual admin overhead $136,965
2012 RDCO actual admin overhead $127,810
2011 RDCO actual admin overhead $143,186

2017 Budget RDCO dog licencing revenue $580,000
2016 RDCO dog licencing actual revenue $614,368
2015 RDCO dog licencing actual revenue $506,404
2014 RDCO dog licencing actual revenue $464,911
2013 RDCO dog licencing actual revenue $348,679
2012 RDCO dog licencing Impounding and MTI actual revenue $372,160
2011 RDCO dog licencing Impounding and MTI actual revenue $380,936
2015 Fraser Valley dog licencing revenue $295,000

2017 RDCO budget tax requisition revenue $640,460
2016 RDCO actual tax requisition revenue $768,644
2015 RDCO actual tax requisition revenue $768,089
2014 RDCO actual tax requisition revenue $861,665
2013 RDCO actual tax requisition revenue $850,526
2012 RDCO actual tax requisition revenue $723,860
2011 RDCO actual tax requisition revenue $662,137
2015 Fraser Valley tax requisition revenue $291,710

2017 Budget Tax Requisition $640,460
2016 Actual Tax Requisition $768,644
                      difference of $128,184 less in 2017 (after collecting a lot more in licence fees by
                      raising the fine for "no dog licence" from $100 to $300)

RDCO # of Dog Complaints
2011 - 2,857
2012 - 2,610
2013 - 2,618
2014 - 3,394
2015 - 2,089

2015 Fraser Valley # of Dog Complaints 3,228

2015 Fraser Valley RD Budget $744,010

RDCO proposed Dog Budget 2017 $1,416,382
RDCO Actual Dog Budget in 2016 $1,499,872
RDCO Actual Dog Budget in 2015 $1,531,865
RDCO Actual Dog Budget in 2014 $1,387,509
RDCO Actual Dog Budget in 2013 $1,095,298
RDCO Actual Dog Budget in 2012 $1,033,864
RDCO Actual Dog Budget in 2011 $988,017

RDCO Impounding Revenue
2017 Budget - 40,000
2016 Actual - 41,424
2015 Actual - 61,865
2014 Actual - 88,803
2013 Actual - 44,444
2012 Actual - mixed in with dog licencing so no stats for this year 380,936
2011 Actual - mixed in with dog licencing so no stats for this year 372,160

RDCO Ticketing Revenue
2017 Budget - 1,500
2016 Actual - 1,800
2015 Actual - 1,401
2014 Actual - 1,190
2013 Actual - 14,925
2012 Actual - 447
2011 Actual - 291

Fraser Valley 2015 MTI tickets revenue 15,500
Fraser Valley 2015 Boarding and Impound Fee Revenue 40,000

RDCO Bylaw Adjudication Revenue
2017 Budget - 45,000
2016 Actual - 62,902
2015 Actual - 83,251
2014 Actual - 61,205
2013 Actual - 10,745

RDCO Dog Licencing, Impounding & MTI combined
2012 - 372,160
2011 - 380,936

Fraser Valley 2015 Other Licences & Permits revenue 295,000


RDCO FTE's (FTE = full time equivalent staff)
2011 - 8.78
2012 - 8.83
2013 - 9.138
2014 - 10.460
2015 - 10.710
2016 - 10.710
2017 - 10.760

Budget Increases in Payroll
2011 - $34k
2012 - $8k
2013 - $18k
2014 - $119.6k
2015 - $39k
2016 - $15.3k
2017 - $20.3k

Grant to SPCA
2017 Budget - $92,000
2016 actual - $92,000
2015 actual - $87,000
2014 actual - $93,808
2013 actual - $67,000
2012 actual - $67,000
2011 actual - $67,000

RDCO Operations Expense
2017 Budget - $1,144,382
2016 Actual - $970,581
2015 Actual - $1,010,463
2014 Actual - $950,089 (Advertising, promo new dog program & parks signs $25k)
2013 Actual - $895,359
2012 Actual - $945,920 (deficit due to unplanned legal challenges)
2011 Actual - $782,810

Transfer from Capital - TCA Reclass.
2017 Budget - $0
2016 Actual - $15,570
2015 Actual - account did not exist
2014 Actual - account did not exist
2013 Actual - account did not exist
2012 Actual - account did not exist
2011 Actual - account did not exist

Transfer to Equipment Reserves
2017 Budget - $100,000
2016 Actual - $28,000
2015 Actual - $28,000
2014 Actual - $28,000
2013 Actual - $28,000
2012 Actual - $28,000
2011 Actual - $28,000

Equipment Reserve Fund Balance at Y/E
2011 - $37,286
2012 - $61,932
2013 - $37,603
2014 - $62,890
2015 - $80,567
2016 - $109,420
2017 Budget - $126,077 Equipment reserves required for upcoming vehicle and equipment replacements. Transfer additional amount this year due to larger surplus.

Transfer to Capital
2017 Budget - $0
2016 Actual - $16,260
2015 Actual - $0
2014 Actual - $0
2013 Actual - $0
2012 Actual - $0
2011 Actual - $15,000

Transfer to Facilities Reserves
2017 Budget - $50,000
2016 Actual - $30,000
2015 Actual - $30,000
2014 Actual - $30,000
2013 Actual - $30,000
2012 Actual - $30,000
2011 Actual - $30,000

Facilities Reserve Balance at Y/E
2011 - $63,494
2012 - $47,697
2013 - $50,802
2014 - $67,395
2015 - $70,736
2016 - $88,658
2017 Budget - $85,367 - Facilities Reserves required to expand the pound or rebuild in the future.

Transfer to Operating Reserves
2017 Budget - $30,000
2016 Actual - $60,000
2015 Actual - $200,000
2014 Actual - $0
2013 Actual - account did not exist
2012 Actual - account did not exist
2011 Actual - account did not exist

==================================

Actual General Revenue Fund Revenue
2011 - $988,017
2012 - $1,033,864
2013 - $1,095,298
2014 - $1,387,509
2015 - $1,531,865
2016 - $1,499,872
2017 Budget - $1,416,382

Total Actual General Revenue Fund Expenses
2011 - $922,810
2012 - $1,070,920
2013 - $1,020,359
2014 - $1,101,897
2015 - $1,355,463
2016 - $1,212,411
2017 Budget - $1,416,382

Actual General Capital Fund Revenue
2011 - $121,446
2012 - $49,752
2013 - $85,293
2014 - $22,048
2015 - $38,459
2016 - $29,087
2017 Budget - $137,799

Total Actual General Capital Fund Expenses
2011 - $121,446
2012 - $49,752
2013 - $85,293
2014 - $22,048
2015 - $38,459
2016 - $29,087
2017 Budget - $137,799

Dog Control Actual General Revenue Surplus's at year end
2011 - $65,207
2012 - $37,056
2013 - $74,938
2014 - $285,613
2015 - $176,402
2016 - $287,461
2017 Budget - says $0 but so did all the other years until year end

Operating Reserve Balance at Y/E did not start until 2015 budget
2015 - $200,000
2016 - $262,117
2017 Budget - $294,738

Blue Divider Line

Surrey sinks its teeth into comprehensive new dog bylaw
by Kevin Diakiw - Surrey North Delta Leader - Feb 7, 2017

Ten-year-old Doberman pinscher Ace was too busy helping his owner Gurbachan Kaler shovel snow Monday to notice that Surrey council has drafted a tough new dog bylaw.— Image Credit: Boaz Joseph / The Leader

There will soon be four kinds of dog in Surrey – and it has nothing to do with their breed.

Surrey is revamping its Dog Responsibility Bylaw and once again has chosen not to make the law breed specific.

There have been calls to create tougher laws – even bans – on dogs such as pit bull-type breeds.

Known as breed-specific legislation (BSL), Surrey has determined that model wouldn't best serve the city.

"Our analysis within the communities in which BSL has been implemented provided little evidence to suggest that breed bans have had a positive impact on dog attacks," a report to city council on Monday states. "They impart a misleading sense of security and suggest that there is a simple solution to a complex community issue. Studies in other municipalities suggest that BSL has a tendency to compromise rather than enhance public safety."

Coun. Tom Gill told said Monday he was surprised to learn from the report that breed bans have little positive effect.

Jas Rehal, Surrey's manager of bylaw enforcement, said a breed ban isn't the right answer to the problem of dog attacks.

"Ultimately we wanted a tool that wouldn't be limited," Rehal told The Leader. "We want a tool that's going to protect our residents from any dog attack and we feel this one does that."

Instead of pursuing a breed ban, Surrey is designating four different classifications of dogs: normal, aggressive, vicious and dangerous.

An aggressive dog will gain that status by being combative to a person or another animal without being provoked, or if it has caused a "minor" injury to them.

A vicious dog has caused "serious" injury to a person or animal, or has the tendency to attack without provocation, or has caused minor injury more than once.

(A minor injury is bruising, scratches or shallow punctures, while a serious one involves deep puncture wounds or broken bones).

A dangerous dog has killed or seriously injured an animal or person or was previously vicious and has since attacked.

Under each of these classifications, several restrictions are enacted.

An aggressive dog must be kept on a leash no longer than one metre when not on the owner's property and must be muzzled when in an off-leash park. The owner must also obtain permanent identification information for the city's records.

The owner of an aggressive dog will also have to take a course to learn how to control the animal's behaviour before it is taken off the aggressive list.

The owner of a vicious dog must follow all of the above restrictions, as well as post a sign on their property warning people the dog is vicious. The animal must also be kept in a confined enclosure when outside on the owner's property.

The owner of a dangerous dog must follow all of the above restrictions plus get written confirmation from a city-approved trainer that the animal is undergoing appropriate training. The owner must also provide evidence of liability insurance of not less than $500,000 for a year.

An owner of a dangerous dog unwilling to comply with the requirements will have their dog seized for two weeks, after which the dog may be euthanized.

The new bylaw, five-and-a-half months in the works, was created in collaboration with several animal experts, including the BCSPCA, the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association and the American Veterinary Medical Association.

The City of Surrey also sought the advice of dog behaviour expert Dr. Rebecca Ledger who has served in court as an expert witness in animal cruelty and aggression cases.

In crafting the bylaw, the team examined other cities with best practices, including Toronto and Montreal.

"The biggest thing (the bylaw) brings in is the "tiering" system," Rehal said. "We get complaints now of animals demonstrating aggressive behaviour and unfortunately with the old (bylaw), the ultimate control we had was the dangerous dog definition."

Dogs had to be an extreme threat to meet that designation.

The bylaw has passed third reading. It's expected to become law on Feb. 20.

Source: http://www.surreyleader.com/news/413079733.html

Blue Divider Line

Surrey skips breed ban, but puts more teeth in updated dog bylaw
Vancouver Sun - by Cheryl Chan - February 6, 2017

A new dog bylaw in the City of Surrey is designed to give enforcement officers more tools to deal with problems, including stiff fines and property signs.

The City of Surrey won’t be banning any breed of dogs, but instead will update its dog bylaw to give it more teeth.

On Monday, councillors voted to repeal the city’s existing dog bylaw and replace it with a new “animal responsibility bylaw” which gives enforcement officers a wider range of tools to handle problematic dogs and hold their owners accountable.

“It gives us some new tools and powers to enforce in certain situations,” said Jas Rehal, the manager of bylaw enforcement and licensing, before the evening meeting. “Now we can have the ability to go aggressively on enforcement.”

Under the old bylaw, the city could only flag dogs as “dangerous” after an attack. The new bylaw allows the city to designate problem dogs as either aggressive, vicious or dangerous and require owners to get help from a qualified professional trainer, muzzle or confine the dog, or put up warning signs on their property.

The hope, said Rehal, is that cases can be addressed at the aggressive and vicious stage before they progress to an attack or a dog bite.


The new bylaw allows officials to levy multiple fines for infractions and requires owners of problem dogs to pay higher licensing fees of up to $500 for a dangerous dog compared to $43 for a regular licence.

The review of the municipality’s dog bylaws began last June after a 65-year-old woman was injured by an off-leash pit bull in an unprovoked attack.

City staff recommended against breed-specific legislation similar to Montreal, Winnipeg or Ontario, which singles out pit bull-type breeds.

In a report presented to council, Dr. Rebecca Ledger, an animal behaviour and welfare expert, said data suggests breed-specific legislation “is ineffective” at reducing cases of dog bites against humans. The B.C. SPCA also does not support breed-specific bans.

“We wanted a tool that’s going to protect our residents from any dog attack, regardless of breed,” said Rehal, noting that pit bull attacks only make up a small percentage of all reported dog bites.

chchan "at" postmedia.com

Twitter.com/cherylchan

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email vantips "at" postmedia.com

Source: http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/surrey-skips-breed-ban-but-puts-more-teeth-in-updated-dog-bylaw

Blue Divider Line

Peachland dog owner accuses regional district of dirty tricks
Infotel.ca - by Adam Proskiw - January 06, 2017

Peachland resident Drew Panton and Buddy, one of two dogs that bit and seriously injured another dog Jan. 1, 2015.

PEACHLAND – The owner of a dog labelled dangerous by the regional district is accusing them of using licence fees to get around a judge’s ruling.

Peachland resident Drew Panton’s two off-leash dogs — Buddy, an American bulldog, and Jake, a presa canario — attacked and fatally injured a Lhasa apso on New Year’s Day in 2015.

The regional district seized Jake and Buddy and sought a dangerous dog order.

On Aug. 4, Judge Anne Wallace ordered Jake be euthanized and after hearing testimony from an animal behavior expert, ruled Buddy could return home if kept under strict conditions.

Panton thought the regional district’s actions were unfair as this was the first offense for either dog and he appealed Wallace’s decision. Although the decision was upheld and Jake was put down, Panton says at least he got a judge to rule on an owner’s right to a trial by judge, rather than leaving such a major decision up to the regional district.

Now he says the regional district have switched tactics.

“Instead of licencing as dangerous dog for $75 a year, they’ve sent me a notice saying it’s going to cost $500 a year,” he says. “How do you justify a 900 per cent increase?”

Panton estimates he has already spent roughly $25,000 upgrading his yard in accordance with the judge’s orders, and accuses the Regional District of squeezing him to the point where he can no longer afford to keep his best friend.

“It’s an obvious attempt to tell people even if you win (in court) we’re still going to hit you for $500 a year and nobody can stop us. I’ve never seen a more blatant attempt to get by a judge’s decision.”

Panton is no stranger to court either. He represented himself against the regional district in Provincial court trying to save Jake from death row. Now he says it looks like he’ll be headed back.

“The only process I have is to not buy a licence and then challenge the ticket in a Provincial courtroom,” he says.

According to the Regional District of the Central Okanagan website any dog owner caught with an unlicenced dog will be fined $300 plus the cost of the licence.

Source: http://infotel.ca/newsitem/peachland-dog-owner-accuses-regional-district-of-dirty-tricks/it38451

Blue Divider Line

Tiny dog attacked at park
Castanet.net - Dustin Godfrey - Oct 31, 2016 - Story: 179610

Photo: Megan De Kock
A woman says her Boston terrier is lucky to be alive after it was attacked by another dog.

Megan De Kock said she was walking her dog and a foster dog in the Glenrosa area of West Kelowna, when she saw a large, brown dog running toward her with no leash on.

"I managed to say, "no" and "stop", and she did at first stop, but she just sort of ... went around me and went for my smaller, female Boston," she said. "And she latched on and wouldn't let go. I jumped in and tried to save her, and the dog dragged us down the street."

She said somebody had reported the dog, which had no collar on, to animal control, and bylaw officers soon arrived.

"They hit the dog with batons and the dog wouldn't let go, I was doing everything I could to stop it," she said. "They had to resort to pepper spray, they did their best to try and avoid me, but of course I got it because I was in the middle of the fight, and it took two of them and the pepper spray with batons to get this dog off my dog."

Her dog was rushed to emergency surgery with gashes all over the right side of its face and neck, including a gouge just under its eye, while she was treated by an ambulance.

She noted her proximity to the school during the attack, and that there were children nearby.

"What if the bylaw didn't come?" she said.

The dog, which workers at animal control told De Kock is a female pitbull, is now in the custody of animal control.

De Kock and authorities are now hoping that the owner or somebody with information on the dog's owner will come forward to take responsibility for the dog.

"You should be contacting my vet and stepping up," she said. "She's got a long road ahead of her to recover, if she ever fully recovers."

De Kock sought to make clear that she isn't against any breed of dogs, including pitbulls, despite movements in Canada and around the world to ban the breed.

"I love dogs, this is more about taking responsibility for your pet," she said. "People have got to step up."

While animal control told De Kock the dog is a pitbull, she said she couldn't confirm that, noting it could be a mixed breed.

Source:  http://www.castanet.net/news/West-Kelowna/179610/Tiny-dog-attacked-at-park

Now why would dog control hit the dog with batons instead of maybe stick their finger up the dogs butt to get the dog to let go?

Blue Divider Line

Fire Crews Receive Pet Masks
1075kiss.com - 10/17/2016 - by Pete McIntyre

Demonstration of pet oxygen mask
A fundraiser has allowed dozens of BC fire departments to receive free pet oxygen mask sets.

The Happy Dogs Legacy Campaign raised nearly $40,000 for the devices after a Burnaby house fire in May took the lives of seven dogs and two cats.

Each kit includes a set of three oxygen masks in various sizes, tubing to connect masks to an oxygen supply, and a training DVD.

Vernon Fire Rescue will be getting four sets, while kits will also be going to fire departments in Lumby, Enderby, Salmon Arm and Lake Country, among many others.

"We are immensely grateful to everyone who supported this campaign so we could make this legacy a reality - from the volunteers who tirelessly called halls to get mask numbers, to each and every donor who make a contribution - we could not have done this without you," says Happy Dogs Legacy Team Member Elisha McCallum. "Knowing that there will soon be 328 more pet oxygen masks sets in use around the province gives us hope that more companion animals, of all shapes and sizes, will have a fighting chance if exposed to smoke in a fire and that the heartache over the loss of a pet can be prevented."

For more details, go to www.happydogslegacy.com

Source: http://www.1075kiss.com/top-news-stories/2016/10/17/fire-crews-receive-pet-masks

Blue Divider Line

.pdf icon October 13, 2016 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Dog Licensing Fees Updated
The Regional Board has adopted amendments to annual licensing fees under the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw. The vast majority of dog owners renewing their license during the first two months of the year, won’t see any change. As in the past, after February 28th license fees for a dog that is spayed or neutered is $40 and the fee for dogs that are not fixed is $80. Owners renewing or purchasing their annual license before the end of February each year will receive a $20 discount. The half price license fee after July 31st has been discontinued. New dogs licensed after September 30th each year will receive a license for the remainder of that year as well as for the next calendar year.

Two Dog Bylaw Fines Adjusted
The Regional Board has adopted amendments to two fines under the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw to improve clarity and compliance. One adjustment provides a 50% discount for the $300 no valid dog license fine, if the ticket is paid within 14 days. This measure provides an incentive for owners to pay their ticket on time. A second change brings the fine for an aggressive dog in a prohibited area (park, playground, beach/swimming area or sports field) into line with the $300 fine amount for an owner who fails to control or enclose an aggressive dog.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 13, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (301 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 RDCO Responsible Dog Ownership Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption - .wma (4.77 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.2 RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw & RDCO Ticket Information Utilization Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption - .wma (2.06 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Stack asking CAO Brian Reardon where the dangerous dog report is that is suppose to be coming - .wma (578 KB)

.pdf icon October 13, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 7.1 RDCO Responsible Dog Ownership Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption

.pdf icon Item 7.2 RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw & RDCO Ticket Information Utilization Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption

*Note* Please click link above for entire content

Amendments to the RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No. 1326 & RDCO Ticket Information Utilization Bylaw No. 435
Voting Entitlement: (All Directors – Unweighted Corporate Vote – 2/3rd Majority – LGA 208.1 & 228)

Purpose: To propose bylaw amendments for fines related to the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343.
Executive Summary:
Staff has undertaken an audit of the number of ‘no dog license’ tickets issued under the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 which have not been paid. During the ticket audit, it became evident that a number of dog owners are failing to pay their fine(s) and consequently the outstanding amount is forwarded to a Collection Agency.
It is believed that if the early payment discount (payment within 14 days of the ticket issued) is increased from $25 to $150 there will be higher compliance by dog owners to pay their fine within the 14 day period.
In addition, on review of the ticketing bylaw the fine for Section 37 - Dogs in prohibited area, aggressive is currently $200; the fine for Section 38 - Failure to control/enclose an aggressive dog is $300. As the ticket pertains to an aggressive dog staff recommends the Section 37 fine should be the same as Section 38 at $300.

Background:
Amendment #1
Zero Tolerance for no dog license is working. Staff believes there is a likelihood of success in getting dog owners to pay their fines within 14 days by increasing the ‘early payment discount’ from $25 to $150. Bylaw enforcement staff will educate in the field that paying early will save them money, staff time will be saved by not having to process default payments and revenue will not be lost by sending outstanding fines to Collection.
Many local governments, like the Regional District have a zero tolerance policy for no dog license. Since implemented in the Central Okanagan in January 2014, a variety of advertising campaigns and notifications have been undertaken to ensure dog owners are aware of this policy.
Since 2014, 973 no dog license fines of $300 have been issued. 445 have been paid. 159 are either in the grace period before collecting or being paid through a 6-month payment plan. 369 tickets [approximately $110,700] have been forwarded to Collections.
Prior to a fine going to Collections, dog owners receive fair warning that this will occur. An owner has 14 days to pay the fine and currently receives an ‘early payment discount’ of $25 if paid within that timeline. If not paid they have another 14 days to pay the face amount of the ticket (after 28 days the $25 late penalty applies). Legislatively (Bylaw Enforcement Act-Part 4), the Regional District may then begin collection procedures. At this point, if the fine is not paid a first notice is mailed notifying the dog owner that they have 28 days to pay the fine or will face collection proceedings. After that, a final notice is mailed providing a further 14 days to pay. If the fine remains unpaid it is sent to Collections (this is after providing 70 days to pay). The Collection Agency fee is 30% of the debt owed.
Licensing continues to increase: 19,815 in 2014, to 21,707 in 2015, and in 2016 approximately 23,900.

Amendment #2
An increase in the ticket in the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343:
o Section 37 (or an aggressive dog) – “no Owner shall allow a Dangerous Dog or an Aggressive Dog into any sports filed, playground, public beach, swimming area, park, off-leash park, or school grounds at any time.”
- Currently the ticket for this offence is $200 – recommendation is to increase the fine to $300 to match the same fine amount as Section 38 (fail to control/enclose aggressive dog). 163

Amendment #3
Housekeeping amendment to delete Schedule “B” which is the Southern Interior Bylaw Notice Dispute Adjudication Registry Agreement. This Agreement should not form part of a bylaw as it is not necessary and is amended from time to time as other local governments enter into the Bylaw Adjudication Process.

Financial Considerations:
- A reduction in ticketing revenue should the ticket be paid within the 14 days. This will be offset by not paying 30% collection fees (the return rate on tickets sent to collections is only about 10%).
Organizational Issues:
- Reduction in the amount of staff time required to process outstanding fines to Collection.

External Implications:
- Less angry dog owners who feel a $300 fine for not having a dog license is excessive. If they pay within 14 days the fine is reduced to $150. It is an incentive for dog owners to pay the ticket early for a 50% reduction in their fine.
Alternative Recommendation:
None proposed. The Board may choose not to support the amendments, or change the discount amount being recommended.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 13, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (301 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 RDCO Responsible Dog Ownership Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption - .wma (4.77 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.2 RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw & RDCO Ticket Information Utilization Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption - .wma (2.06 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Stack asking CAO Brian Reardon where the dangerous dog report is that is suppose to be coming - .wma (578 KB)

.pdf icon October 13, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

Minutes of RDCO Board meetings are not usually posted to RDCO's website until after the following meeting which would be October 24th.  If the minutes are not posted here yet, you can check RDCO's website to see if they are posted there yet.  If you want a copy of the minutes before then, contact RDCO who will have a copy of the minutes at their office within 7 days after you request a copy of the minutes.  This is in accordance to Local Government Act Procedure Bylaws and Enforcement section 794 (5) and Community Charter Other records to which public access must be provided section 97 (2)

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 13, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (301 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 RDCO Responsible Dog Ownership Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption - .wma (4.77 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.2 RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw & RDCO Ticket Information Utilization Amendment Bylaw Amendment - Adoption - .wma (2.06 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 13, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Stack asking CAO Brian Reardon where the dangerous dog report is that is suppose to be coming - .wma (578 KB)

Blue Divider Line

Urban deer attacks on the rise with burgeoning population
Infotel.ca - By Charlotte Helston - July 05, 2016

THOMPSON-OKANAGAN - Deer attacks are becoming more common in the region, and people are mostly to blame, according to the B.C. Conservation Service.

Since the beginning of April, conservation officers received more than 200 deer-related complaints across the Thompson-Okanagan. Specifically, Kamloops saw 27 calls, Vernon 45, and Kelowna and Penticton a whopping 74 and 92 respectively.

“Our urban deer populations seem to be growing at an alarming rate,” conservation officer Ken Owens says.

And with that increase, conflicts with people, particularly those walking dogs, are also on the rise. During fawning season, which starts around the end of May and beginning of June, Owens says there were several incidents where mother deer charged, and in some cases attacked, dogs in the Okanagan.

“Deer are hard-wired to protect their fawns. They will aggressively protect them,” Owens says.

Source: http://infotel.ca/newsitem/urban-deer-attacks-on-the-rise-with-burgeoning-population/it32356

Blue Divider Line

Pit bull deemed 'aggressive'
Castanet.net - David Wylie - Jun 21, 2016 | Story: 168836

A pit bull that attacked the dog belonging to the mayor of Peachland has been deemed "aggressive."

Bruce Smith, spokesman for the Regional District of Central Okanagan, says the animal is now considered aggressive under the Responsible Dog Ownership bylaw.

“Once a dog is declared aggressive, the owner is subject to more stringent controls when it’s outside,” says Smith.

Peachland Mayor Cindy Fortin told Castanet Monday she was out for a walk when a pit bull escaped through an unlocked fence and attacked her husky, named Nanook.

She managed to grab the pit bull’s choke chain, and she channeled all her adrenaline into choking the attacking dog off Nanook.

“I consider myself extremely lucky that I wasn’t injured, physically, that is. It will take a long time to erase the images and the sounds of the attack in my mind,” she says.

“Afterwards, I couldn’t stop shaking for hours. Poor Nanook had some serious puncture wounds on his face, one very close to his left eye which would require some surgery and a drainage tube. He also had a wide strip of his flesh torn off his snout and another piece torn off the rubbery tip of his nose.”

Smith says the "dangerous" distinction is used when a dog is involved in an attack causing very serious injury or death.

The aggressive classification under the RDCO bylaw carries certain consequences to dissuade irresponsible dog ownership, including a ban from off-leash dog parks and sports fields. It also means a higher fee for registering aggressive animals.

“It’s an encouragement to keep your dog under control,” says Smith.

Fortin says she shared her story “not to be breed discriminate against pit bulls, but to hopefully bring about more awareness about dangerous dogs.”

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/West-Kelowna/168836/Pit-bull-deemed-aggressive

Blue Divider Line

Letter: No parks for middle-class urban dogs
Kelowna Capital News - Jun 6, 2016

To the editor:

Kelowna's dog park survey has progressed to consulting local residents.

If locals say "no" to the proposed dog beaches, the issue may be shelved for years.

If "yes," the city may claim time, perhaps years, to find development funding for the dog beaches.

That said, only two of the four locations have a chance to become a dog beach. One is the doggy-dip by the Sails to cool visiting dogs, and the other is the Cedar Avenue Beach access.

The Lake Avenue site is within a residential location, and has only six parking spaces. A better choice would be in City Park by the bridge, where there is more parking and vehicle traffic from the bridge would dampen any sounds of barking.

The Poplar Point beach access is too small for more than two dogs at a time. Even so, it would need to be fenced to prevent a dog accidentally running into traffic from the lake. Also, if a dog or person were to be injured while crossing to the beach, the city could be liable.

Why is the city ignoring Sutherland Park? It could become a dog beach again without costly development.

If Cedar Avenue is blessed with a "yes" from locals, the cost to develop the three properties would be close to that provided to the Kelowna Paddle Centre's development which, with fewer than 1,000 members, was given a five-year lease of the four lots as well as a clubhouse.

In contrast there are at least 38,000 dog owners left without a dog beach downtown while the city has delayed development of the remaining Abbott Street properties to 2027.

Have dog owners no voice in city hall?

If developed to a downtown park standard, Cedar Avenue dog beach could become a template for other dog beaches, hopefully in locations already semi-developed, like Sutherland Park and City Park along the bridge.

The dog owners who are most underserved with dog beaches and dog parks live mainly in Kelowna's urban sectors. They do not live on an acreage, on waterfront properties, or near large regional parks where dogs on leash are allowed. There is a sad divide between wealthy dogs and middle-class dogs when it comes to green spaces or water.

The City of Kelowna has a duty to level that divide by providing dog beaches where needed, as well as .72-hectare dog parks in all residential sectors. And it must maintain these parks as it does parks that are not exclusively for dog owners.

Helen Schiele, Kelowna

Source: http://www.kelownacapnews.com/opinion/letters/382006461.html

Blue Divider Line

Fintry dog that attacked owner euthanized
infotel.ca - By Adam Proskiw - June 10, 2016

WEST KELOWNA – The dog that bit and seriously injured its owner last week has been euthanized.

Regional District spokesperson Bruce Smith says in an emailed statement the multiple injuries the Fintry man sustained on Dunwaters Road June 2 were serious enough he had to spend at least one night in Kelowna General Hospital.

It was euthanized today, June 10.

The dog has no record of aggressiveness but the owner voluntarily surrendered it for destruction, Smith says in the statement.

At the time of the attack Smith had said it was a pitbull-type dog but he didn't know if it was a purebred or a mix.

The identity of the victim is not being disclosed.

Source: http://infotel.ca/newsitem/fintry-dog-that-attacked-owner-euthanized/it31558

Blue Divider Line

Vicious dog attack
Kate Bouey - Jun 6, 2016 | Story: 167558

A pit bull was seized by authorities on the weekend after a vicious attack that sent a man to hospital.

“We had a report of a serious dog attack on a person at a residence on Dunwaters Road in the Fintry area,” said Bruce Smith, spokesperson for the Regional District of Central Okanagan. “The victim was taken to (Kelowna General Hospital) where he was treated and released.”

The attack occurred in the early evening of Thursday, June 2.

North Okanagan RCMP attended while a dog control official removed the pit bull from the property on the Muir Estates Saturday morning.

The animal was “seized with a warrant in the interests of public safety” and is being held at the dog pound pending an investigation which is ongoing, said Smith.

“It's the most severe dog attack that I've ever seen,” said a witness who did not want to be identified. “We were hoping he wasn't going to die.”

While Smith called the animal a "pit bull type dog," the witness identified it as a pit bull and said the owner was the victim of the attack.

The victim's shoulder and chest were torn up, but BC Ambulance personnel arrived on scene and were able to quickly stop the bleeding, said the witness.

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Kelowna/167558/Vicious-dog-attack

=============

Comments

Anonymous
I live down the street from this house. I am also a devout Pitty Lover!! I've owned and raised them from puppies. They are the most loving, calm, loyal, happy, and eager to please dogs on the planet. Who couldn't resist their smile! But these 2 dogs that attacked their owner....(there are 2 pit bulls on the residence) and yes...they are pure breed American Pit bull Terriers....these dogs are mean, they are used to guard the property. They are always outside the residence behind a gated, chain link fence where they snarl, snort and bark aggressively at passing cars, jumping against and pawing at the fence. I would never walk past that house, I don't even drive by. It's terrifying. These dogs can do damage, obviously! People make bad choices and decisions. Dogs just do what you teach them. I made a bad choice not to report these dogs' aggressive behavior, I avoided the problem. Lesson learnt!! I hate the consequences, this dog will be euthanized, the owner severely injured. It's sad because it could have been avoided.

Werall Gonnadie
All the neighbours know he beat that dog on occasion. As far as I'm concerned he got what he deserved. Probably left a bad taste in the dog's mouth!

Blue Divider Line

Residents urged to take responsibility for pets, livestock after Okanagan cougar attack
Infotel.ca - By Charlotte Helston - June 07, 2016

VERNON - Hobby farmers and pet owners in the North Okanagan are being reminded to take precautions after a cougar killed three goats earlier this week near Swan Lake.

The night of Sunday, June 5, a cougar attacked three goats in a residential area northeast of Swan Lake, conservation officer Terry Myroniuk says.

“The owner of the goats actually observed the cougar carrying one of the goats off,” he says.

There were also sightings of a cougar around a nearby elementary school during May, and it’s possible it’s the same animal, Myroniuk says.

Traps have been set by the conservation service and Myroniuk says they have no choice but to put the animal down.

“Unfortunately when they have actually switched their prey pattern from deer to livestock, they will have a tendency to focus their efforts more on livestock as a food source. They also associate livestock to being around people, so it will also keep bringing them into the community,” Myroniuk says.

Relocating cougars is challenging because they try to return to their original territories, and if they are habituated to preying upon pets and livestock, they are likely to continue that pattern wherever they are.

“Prevention is the key here,” Myroniuk says. “We’re asking people to protect their pets and livestock and keep them inside or in an enclosed shed at night. It’s the best thing to preventing problems with cougars.”

He says the goats in this particular case were left out in the open overnight, and believes the encounter could have been prevented.

“People need to take responsibility and protect their own animals,” he says. “A lot of hobby farmers maybe don’t expect that close to town like that there are cougars. A lot of the conflicts are people who maybe have not fully appreciated the potential threat.”

In addition to keeping pets and livestock secured, the conservation service is also reminding parents to educate their children on what to do if they see a cougar.

Another thing to remember is that cougars are attracted to deer.

“So, people that are feeding deer or attracting deer to their properties are increasing the risk,” Myroniuk says. “It’s not a good idea to feed any wildlife.”

To report a human-wildlife conflict, call the Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) line toll free at 1 877 952-7277 (RAPP), or visit the RAPP website.

Source: http://infotel.ca/newsitem/residents-urged-to-take-responsibility-for-pets-livestock-after-okanagan-cougar-attack/it31439

Blue Divider Line

Landmark ruling: BC SPCA wins fight to keep emotionally abused dog
May 31, 2016 - BCCTV News

In what’s being hailed as a landmark case for fighting animal abuse in B.C., a seized dog will not be returned to its owner over concerns it would endure future “emotional suffering.”
The German shepherd named Kello has been in the care of the BC SPCA since it was removed from the home of Vancouver senior Tarmo Viitre on March 9.
Brandon Isenor, a special constable from the animal welfare agency, visited the residence over complaints the large dog was being kept inside the 72-year-old’s vehicle for prolonged amounts of time.
But during the visit, Isenor said the senior continued to “act out physically” against the dog, including repeatedly striking Kello on the head hard enough “that the dog yelped and cowered,” according to a panel decision released online.
Isenor returned the next day with two Vancouver police officers to remove the dog, which remains at a local shelter.
Although Viitre was not charged with animal cruelty, the custody battle over the canine was just brought before a panel from the B.C. Farm Industry Review Board, the agency tasked with hearing appeals from decisions of the BC SPCA not to return animals to their owners.
Testifying about the behaviour he witnessed during his home visit, Isenor said that Viitre “smacked” his dog and “dragged him by his choke collar, grabbed him harshly by his snout in his efforts to restrain the dog.”
The constable testified that Viitre justified the behaviour by saying he had owned three German shepherds, and “that this was the way that he trained them.” Viitre told the panel he was preventing the dog from attacking the constable.
The panel also heard from a witness named Jessica MacDonald who testified she had seen Viitre yelling at his previous dog, Kali, and watched in horror as he whipped it with the leather end of the leash.
MacDonald reported to the SPCA in 2013 that the senior was in a “violent rage” when he dragged the dog up the stairs into his home, noting that the dog was yelping and whining and its legs were slipping.
In his defence, Viitre told the panel he had only struck his previous dog Kali once, and this must have been the incident witnessed by MacDonald. He refused ever abusing his current dog Kello – saying he considered the dog to be a member of the family – but his actions “had simply been a method of training the dog.”
But animal behaviourist Dr. Rebecca Ledger disagreed that his actions were a matter of training and handling, and said it demonstrated long-term emotional abuse.
Her examination of the animal at the shelter concluded that Viitre “handled Kello in ways that cause him physical and emotional suffering and pain since he was a puppy.”
During her assessment, she wrote that the dog was “extremely fearful” and exhibited “suspicious behaviour,” consistent with an animal who has been verbally and physically abused.
She argued that returning the dog to the senior would put the animal “into a situation in which he would suffer harm and distress,” adding that Kello needed extensive costly and time-consuming rehabilitation.
Even if Viitre agreed to refrain from using physical force and yelling at the dog, the behaviorist felt the dog would remain fearful for years, and she felt the dog may never recover from the psychological harm.
The panel agreed with Ledger’s recommendations and ruled that the BC SPCA’s seizure of the dog was justified – and Kello would not be returned to his owner.
Being able to use behaviour forensics to prove an animal is in emotional distress is a powerful new tool that the BC SPCA believes will prevent pets from being returned to “bad” owners.
“Even though there is no clear physical evidence, like where someone breaks an animal’s leg, this shows the emotional scars that are left on an animal,” said chief enforcement officer Marcie Moriarty.
“This is a groundbreaking case. Without that type of scientific evidence of emotional suffering provided by renowned experts like Dr. Ledger, these types of cases would be much more challenging to proceed criminally or civilly.”
Moriarty says this ruling sends a message that causing an animal pain in the name of training is no longer acceptable.
“There are still people and trainers out there that are perpetuating long-debunked theories that dominance is effective in training dogs,” she said.
“Using pain and aversion under the guise of training is not an excuse for abuse.”
Viitre has repaid $1,166.30 to the BC SPCA for care costs.
The senior has notified the BC SPCA that he will fight the panel’s decision, and will appeal through the Supreme Court.

Source: http://bc.ctvnews.ca/landmark-ruling-bc-spca-wins-fight-to-keep-emotionally-abused-dog-1.2925259

Blue Divider Line

Heavy doody headache
Castanet.net - Carmen Weld - May 2, 2016 | Story: 164722

Dogs must answer the call of nature. And when you add up all the poop from all the dogs in Kelowna, you get a whole lot of doo-doo.

But how much is left behind by owners who don't pick up after their pets?

According to the City of Kelowna, about 38 per cent of Kelowna residents own dogs, and given there are about 120,000 residents in Kelowna, that puts the number at about 45,000.

But, the Regional District of Central Okanagan says there are approximately 36,000 dogs in the RDCO, 22,000 of which are registered.

For the sake of argument, let's say there are 40,000 dogs in the Central Okanagan.

The average doggy deposit is said to weigh 0.17 of a kilogram, and the average dog does so twice a day.

Over the course of a year, that equals 5,000,000 kg of poop – or 5,000 tonnes.

That equals the weight of a decommissioned Royal Navy Trafalgar-class submarine each year.

While most dog owners are responsible and pick up after Fido, many do not.

If you believe a claim that states 40 per cent of dog owners don't pick, that's more than 2,000 tonnes of canine calling cards left to ruin your day. (Note: numbers are a best guess based on statistics provided)

Both the city and RDCO are fed up with the party poopers.

“It's not that this year is any better or worse than a typical year, but we do get quite a few calls and concerns from people about dog feces and owners not picking up,” says city park services manager Ian Wilson.

“Every year, it is a problem. When we did our survey for dog parks, we asked people why they don't use dog parks, and the main reasons were dogs that are not well behaved and the mess, owners not picking up.”

“We've taken steps in the last number of years to promote responsible dog ownership, and most people are responsible," adds RDCO communications officer Bruce Smith. "Unfortunately, the ones that don't tar all owners with a bad brush.”

Smith says bylaw officers have written 15 warning tickets in 2016 and given just one fine for failing to poop and scoop.

Wilson and Smith say the waste can cause problems.

“There have been studies done, especially in the States, where they look at the impact on a watershed basis and they show it can be quite significant. If you look at the amount of dog feces that can eventually wash into the storm sewers and into the creeks and into the watershed, it can be significant. If you multiply it by the thousands of dogs, it can add up,” says Wilson.

“Dog feces can be a health hazard,” Smith adds. “It only takes a few dog owners not picking up in public places to negatively reflect on all dog owners. As well, please don’t leave your bagged poop beside park trails or sidewalks or hanging in a bush. That’s just doing half the job. Please drop it in the nearest garbage can or take it home and properly dispose of it there.”

In a recent Castanet poll, 71 per cent of respondents felt the RDCO is not doing enough to enforce poop-and-scoop bylaws.

Dog owners can face warnings and fines if they are caught leaving behind Fido's feces.

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Kelowna/164722/Heavy-doody-headache

Blue Divider Line

.pdf icon April 25, 2016 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

RDCO-SPCA Memorandum Renewed

The Regional Board has approved renewing a Memorandum of Understanding with the SPCA. The three year agreement sees the Society provide public education programs; a successful spay and neuter program and dog adoption services. The Regional District provides $92,000 a year to the Society for those services in the Central Okanagan.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio April 25, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (189 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files April 25, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about item 7.1 SPCA Memorandum of Understanding - SPCA $92,000 - .wma (3.58 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files April 25, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item Carson - mentioning that Enderby requires dog owners to carry a doggie bag - .wma (478 KB)

.pdf icon April 25, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon 7.1 SPCA Memorandum of Understanding - SPCA $92,000

*Note* Please click link above for entire content

$17,000 for adoption of unclaimed, adoptable dogs that have been in the RDCO Pound for more than 72 hours; $55,000 for a spay and neuter program; $20,000 for an animal education program.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio April 25, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (189 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files April 25, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about item 7.1 SPCA Memorandum of Understanding - SPCA $92,000 - .wma (3.58 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files April 25, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item Carson - mentioning that Enderby requires dog owners to carry a doggie bag - .wma (478 KB)

.pdf icon April 25, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

7. CORPORATE SERVICES
7.1 Memorandum of Understanding – SPCA [All Directors - Weighted Vote - LGA 210(2a)]
Staff report dated April 18, 2016 outlined the renewal of a three-year Memorandum of Understanding between the RDCO and the SPCA for a spay and neuter program, education program and adoption services for dogs from RDCO Dog Control.
STACK/CARSON
THAT the Regional Board approve the Memorandum of Understanding with the SPCA for a three-year period (2016-2018) at a cost of $92,000 per year and authorize its signing officers to enter into this agreement.
CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio April 25, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (189 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files April 25, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about item 7.1 SPCA Memorandum of Understanding - SPCA $92,000 - .wma (3.58 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files April 25, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item Carson - mentioning that Enderby requires dog owners to carry a doggie bag - .wma (478 KB)

Blue Divider Line

West Kelowna vet says local dog attack numbers are problematic
Kelowna Now - April 11, 2016 - by Molly Gibson Kirby

Despite a low number of reported dog attacks, a local vet is saying it’s a huge problem in the Okanagan.

Bruce Smith with the Regional District of the Central Okanagan (RDCO) said between January and March this year the district has had six confirmed complaints of aggressive dog attacks and two attacks involving a dangerous dog.

For the same period of last year there were 21 confirmed aggressive dog attacks and two dangerous dog attacks.

That makes it seem like dogs are being less aggressive in the Okanagan, but Dr. Moshe Oz with Rose Valley Veterinary Hospital said he sees a dog every week that has been attacked.

Recently a Lake Country woman wrote an open letter to a woman whose dog attacked her 12-year-old beagle in Winfield. Alice the dog had to go through surgery to fix her ear, which was partially bitten off.

This is a usual occurrence for Dr. Oz, who said every week he sees a number of cases, just like Alice’s.

“Just on Thursday we had two big dogs and they were ripping each other apart. One of them completely almost took the whole arm off. We had six hours of operations in the middle of the night to sew everything together,” Dr. Oz mentioned.

These operations cost an arm and a leg for the owners and Dr. Oz believes the District is seeing such a low number of reports because people want to sort it out themselves. Instead of going right away to the RDCO, Dr. Oz said most people will go to the owner, show them the vet bill and if they will not cover it, then they go to the District.

Dr. Oz said he sees so many dog attacks in the spring time because dogs are excited to be outside in the beautiful weather. According to the veterinarian, it takes a dog some time to learn how to interact with other dogs again. The most important lesson is to always have your dog on a leash.

The second most important tip Dr. Oz could give owners is that if a dog is attacked to bring it to the vet as soon as possible.

“Early treatment and early intervention is way better. A lot of people say that their dog was bitten a week ago, and they come to the vet with very complicated wounds. I prefer them to come earlier because it’s fresher and it’s better for the animal.”

When a dog is attacked, it is not mandatory that the owner stays to sort out and exchange information, however RCMP said it’s morally the right thing to do.

Dr. Oz agreed saying it’s so important to trade contact information, just as someone would do if it was a car accident.

Within in the RDCO bylaw it states that “in the event of aggression or conflict with another dog or person, the Owner takes immediate physical control of his or her dog.” Nowhere in the bylaw does it say staying put after an attack is necessary. KelownaNow readers have commented on several dog attack stories about the need to change the RDCO bylaws since dog attacks are still happening in the region.

Source: https://www.kelownanow.com/watercooler/news/news/Kelowna/16/04/11/
West_Kelowna_vet_says_local_dog_attack_numbers_are_problematic

Blue Divider Line

Only 1 lonely poop ticket
Castanet.net - David Wylie - Apr 11, 2016 | Story: 162905

If you got a $150 ticket for not picking up after your dog, you may be the unluckiest person in the area.

Bylaw officers with the Regional District of Central Okanagan have issued only one lonely ticket for the stinky offence since January 2015.

Communications Officer Bruce Smith said they have also doled out 15 warnings over the past 15 months.

"Most dog owners are pretty good," said Smith.

He stressed the district takes a proactive approach, providing green bags at regional parks as well as educating and encouraging pet owners to stoop and scoop.

"They're your pet; they're no one else's," he said. "You feed it, you exercise it, you give it water, you should also pick up after it."

He said despite the low level of enforcement, bylaw officers are always cognizant of the law while on patrol.

"It's one of those things they're constantly aware of," he said, adding they will stop and talk to pet owners about picking up after their pet.

Last week, the City of Kelowna said a recent survey found people are concerned about the amount of dog droppings not being picked up.

“From the recently conducted dog park survey, residents identified that their primary concern with dog parks in their neighbourhood is cleanliness; specifically, owners not picking up,” said Ian Wilson, the city's park services manager.

Kelowna resident Rhea Kathleen said she could't help but notice the mess while hiking recently.

"I went to Myra Canyon last weekend, and had to walk on the hill of the trail, because it was covered in snow — not a big deal — and a lot of dog poop," she said. "It was so bad!"

"There was even dog poop in a bag, in a puddle of water. That's horrible, at least in my perspective. We were disheartened with the amount of dog waste, and plastic bag waste along the canyon trail."

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Kelowna/162905/only-1-lonely-poop-ticket

Blue Divider Line

Stink over dog poop
David Wylie - Apr 8, 2016 | Story: 162756

Kelowna residents are raising a stink over dog poop, according to a city survey.

“From the recently conducted dog park survey, residents identified that their primary concern with dog parks in their neighbourhood is cleanliness; specifically, owners not picking up,” said Ian Wilson, the city's park services manager.

“With the average dog producing 124 kilograms of waste per year, the waste can quickly add up in our parks, public spaces and along sidewalks if left behind.”

The city says with the mild spring weather, more residents and their dogs are out walking. It issued a reminder Friday to dog owners to pick up after their pets or face a $150 fine.

The waste contains bacteria, nitrogen and salts that don’t dissolve and can be harmful. Waste that is not properly disposed of has the potential of seeping into the ground and being washed into nearby creeks and the lake.

“Residents also regularly contact the city with concerns about off-leash dogs in on-leash parks, especially natural parks like Knox Mountain,” said Wilson. “While the regional district’s dog control officers head out to identified hotspots, for the safety of all park users and wildlife, we’d like to remind owners that dogs must be on-leash, except in a designated off-leash dog park.”

An owner of a pet that comes into conflict with a wild animal is liable for a $345 fine under the Wildlife Act.

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Kelowna/162756/stink-over-dog-poop

Blue Divider Line

Staying put after a dog attack is not mandatory
Central Okanagan Kelowna Now - April 7, 2016 - by Molly Gibson Kirby

Not stopping after your dog attacks another animal may not be illegal, but it is morally wrong, the RCMP say.

On Tuesday evening Amanda Pope was walking her 12-year-old beagle in Winfield, when she said a young woman jogged by her with a white Terrier, who then attacked Alice, her beagle.

Pope said that the woman carried on running and did not stop to make sure Alice was okay.

KelownaNow wanted to know the rules surrounding stopping and staying put if your dog attacks someone else’s. Kelowna RCMP said that failing to stop is not illegal.

“Obviously failing to stop, provide assistance and/or identify themselves is immoral. It may not necessarily constitute criminal negligence. This would of course vary from incident to incident,” explained Cst. Jesse O’Donaghey.

If a dog gets attacked by another animal the owner is asked to contact the Regional District of the Central Okanagan (RDCO).

Bruce Smith, Communications & Intergovernmental Affairs Officer with the RDCO said even though nowhere in the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw does it state owners must stay at the scene of an incident, most do.

“Our experience suggests that most [stop] as a courtesy and share information. If an attack incident is reported to the RDCO Dog Control and Regional Dog Pound, our officers will investigate and determine the appropriate course of action.”

Pope decided not to file a report with the RDCO and instead wrote an open letter to the woman who failed to stop and ask if Alice would be okay. Bruce noted that the RDCO has not noticed that failing to stay at the scene of a dog attack has been a problem in the Okanagan.

Within the bylaw it states that “in the event of aggression or conflict with another dog or person, the Owner takes immediate physical control of his or her dog.”

If an owner fails to comply with the responsible dog ownership bylaw they are liable to a penalty of not less than $50 and not more than $2,000 for each offence.

Smith urged any owner whose dog has been attacked to contact the RDCO to file a report.

Source: https://www.kelownanow.com/watercooler/news/news/Central_Okanagan/16/04/07/
Staying_put_after_a_dog_attack_is_not_mandatory/

Blue Divider Line

Letter: Open letter to bite-and-run dog owner
Apr 7, 2016 - Kelowna Capital News

Open letter to attack dog owner:

An open letter to the young woman who jogged past me with her black and white terrier on Woodsdale Road at Beasley Park at 9:15 p.m. on Tuesday April 5, and whose dog attacked my dog.

I just want to let you know that my dog is going to be OK. Her name is Alice. She is a 12-year-old beagle and she had to undergo surgery last night to fix her ear that was missing a large chunk after your dog bit her.

I don't understand why you just kept on jogging. My dog was obviously injured as she sat on the sidewalk yelping loudly. You seemed like a nice person. Perhaps you panicked.

While it would have been nice if you had stopped to check on her and apologize—or better still to help pay the $600 vet bill to have her ear fixed—I hope, at the very least, when you have some time to think about what happened that you will gain these important lessons from this:

1. Owning a dog is a big responsibility

2. Dogs can be more on edge when they are out in the dark

3. Dogs can also be more on edge when they are out running on a leash

4. If you know your dog can be unfriendly, it is important to have them in complete control when you pass another dog

5. It is better to err on the side of caution and give other dogs a wide berth when passing.

I am an advocate for making our cities more dog friendly, but it is situations like this that cause people to want to keep dogs out of public spaces. We, as dog owners, need to be committed to being responsible for our pets. They might be cute and cuddly at home, but it is different when they are out with all kinds of other stimuli around them.

Amanda Pope, Lake Country

Source: http://www.kelownacapnews.com/opinion/letters/374923091.html

Blue Divider Line

Dog Park Public Engagement

The City is currently undergoing a public consultation process to inform a long-term dog park management plan. Insight gained from this research helps the City make decisions regarding off-leash areas and on-leash parks.

Telephone Survey

DogParkSurvey_Highlights_InfoGraphic
Click here to enlarge the image.
The statistically valid survey represented all Kelowna residents. Responses are weighted by age, gender and city-wide distribution to accurately reflect Kelowna's population. NRG Research Group conducted the telephone survey from January 28, 2016 until approximately February 4, 2016.

Survey goals:

Determine residents' level of support for off-leash dog parks and/or dog beaches
Identify residents' tolerance level for off-leash dog parks and/or dog beaches in their neighbourhood
Identify priority locations for off-leash dog parks and dog beaches
Survey results:

38% of Kelowna households have at least one dog
52% of residents think that there are enough dog parks; whereas 55% think that more off-leash dog beaches are required
52% of dog owners report that their dog(s) rarely or never visit off-leash dog parks for a variety of reasons
76% of residents support the creation of a dog park or dog beach in their neighbourhood
Mission, Glenmore and Rutland were identified as priority areas for future dog parks
Downtown area, Mission and North End/North Kelowna were identified as priority areas for future dog beaches
View the complete results from the Dog Park Statistically Valid Survey.





Online Feedback

The online feedback form was available from January 27 until February 15. There were 1,610 responses with 1,245 completed responses. Majority of the respondents were dog owners (82%).

Online feedback goals:

Identify appropriate and community accepted dog park criteria (e.g. surface materials and infrastructure)
Identify benefits and drawbacks of designated off-leash dog parks
Provide an opportunity for residents to provide feedback or suggestions for dog parks
Online feedback results:

Socialization and exercise were identified as the main benefits of dog parks
Safety factor (e.g. aggressive or uncontrolled dogs or owners) was identified as the main drawback of dog parks
Drinking fountains (for dogs and people), parking and separate area for small dogs were the main infrastructure or dog park amenity priorities
Turf grass was the number one preference for surface material
The majority of respondents would be interested in contributing personal resources such as time, monetary or in-kind donation or both
Common themes that emerged from the open-ended feedback included: location suggestions or requests (e.g. water access, trails and mixed use); park design and amenity suggestions or requests; and concerns about dog parks (e.g. cleanliness/dog waste, enforcement, fines, uncontrolled dogs).

View the complete results from the Online Feedback Form.



Next Steps

Dog_On_Leash

Neighbourhood Consultations
Potential priority locations that were identified in the statistically valid survey through the public engagement process will require neighbourhood consultations. This process will include online engagement and face-to-face opportunities with surrounding potential park or beach neighbours, and stakeholders.

Proposed locations for an off-leash dog beach for further neighbourhood consultation in 2016 include:

Downtown
"mini" beach near the Sails Plaza for a cooling off opportunity
Lake Avenue Beach Access
North End/North Kelowna
Knox Mountain Park, across from Poplar Point Drive
Pandosy/KLO
Cedar Avenue Beach Access
Proposed locations for an off-leash dog park for further neighbourhood consultation in 2016 include:


Pandosy/KLO
Munson Pond Park, western field area (not including the riparian area and the recently constructed pond perimeter trail as this area is environmentally sensitive)




Park Development


Once potential sites for off-leash dog parks and/or dog beaches have been approved by Council and prioritized, each park will have to: be scoped, have cost estimates prepared; and be subject to the same budget approval process as other City projects.


Source: http://www.kelowna.ca/CM/Page4859.aspx

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Dog poop a foul concern for City of Kelowna
by Kelowna Capital News - Kelowna Capital News - Apr 10, 2016

The City of Kelowna is reminding dog owners that if their canines must poop, to remember to scoop it up.— Image Credit: Contributed

With the mild spring weather, more residents and their dogs are enjoying the outdoors.

The City of Kelowna is reminding dog owners that if “they poop, you must scoop.” While majority of owners are responsible and pick-up after their pets, it only takes a handful to create a problem.

“From the recently conducted dog park survey, residents identified that their primary concern with dog parks in their neighbourhood is cleaniness; specifically, owners not picking up,” said Ian Wilson, City of Kelowna parsk services manager.

“With the average dog producing 124 kilograms of waste per year, the waste can quickly add up in our parks, public spaces and along sidewalks if left behind.”

The waste contains bacteria, nitrogen and salts that don’t dissolve and can be harmful. Waste that is not properly disposed of has the potential of seeping into the ground and being washed into nearby creeks and the lake.

“Residents also regularly contact the City with concerns about off-leash dogs in on-leash parks, especially natural parks like Knox Mountain,” said Wilson. “While the regional district’s dog control officers head out to identified hotspots, for the safety of all park users and wildlife, we’d like to remind owners that dogs must be on-leash, except in a designated off-leash dog park.”

An owner of a pet that comes into conflict with a wild animal is liable for a $345 fine under the Wildlife Act. Owners caught not picking up after their dog are subject to a $150 fine.

For more information about dogs in parks, visit kelowna.ca/parks.

Source: http://www.kelownacapnews.com/news/375181271.html

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April 9, 2016 at 9:09am 2 dogs were chasing a deer through our yard at Valley of the Sun

Below are two dogs we seen chasing a deer through our yard.  The black one was in front, with the brown one following.

Conservation has been notified.

If you see these two dogs at large, please report them.  The wildlife also deserve to live in peace without fear of being harassed.

If you see a dog chasing wildlife, you can report it to RAPP (Report a Poacher or Polluter).  Here is information on the Ministry of Environments website on how to contact RAPP.

If you have just witnessed a serious violation, or to report a conflict with wildlife that threatens public safety, or to report an environmental violation or poaching call 1-877-952-7277 (RAPP) or #7277 on the TELUS Mobility Network, or if the situation is not an emergency, report the incident online or contact the nearest Conservation Officer Service district office.  Its the Penticton Office that serves Fintry/North Westside area.

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Dog adoption bid goes off the rails
Kelowna Daily Courier - March 17, 2016 - Andrea Peacock
 


Where is Angus?
Angus is one of the dogs West Kelowna resident Lorinda Shmyr was hoping to adopt.


Where is Pepper?
Pepper, is one of the dogs West Kelowna resident Lorinda Shmyr was hoping to adopt.

Lorinda Shmyr thought she had two dogs lined up to adopt, but when the dogs seemed to go missing without a trace, she was left only with questions.

“I’ve always had a dog, they are a part of my family,” said Shmyr, a West Kelowna resident. “I feel lost without a dog.”
Last Thursday, a co-worker told Shmyr a friend was trying to get rid of her two dogs and asked if Shmyr might be interested in them.
“She sent me pictures, and I said, ‘they’re so cute, they’re exactly what I’m looking for,’ so I asked her a few questions via text message and asked if I could come see them.”
Shmyr scheduled an appointment for that evening, but the other woman later rescheduled for Friday.
“On Friday at about 3:30, I texted her and said I’ll come shortly after I get off work at 4:30, and she sent me a message back saying the dogs were no longer available and it’s a really long story,” said Shmyr. “I said that’s too bad, and I hope it’s a good story.”

The woman replied back saying one of the dogs had gotten out and had been taken by dog control.
“Then she said she can’t bare to have them separated, so she was going to bring the other dog to dog control.”
When Shmyr got in touch with her again via text message after work, the woman said she had already taken the other dog to dog control.

On Saturday, Shmyr called dog control to inquire about the dogs to see if she could adopt them.
“The guy basically shrugged me off and said the dogs are no longer at our facility.”
Shmyr then called Paws it Forward Dog Rescue, Okanagan Small Dog Rescue Society and the SPCA, but no one knew anything about the dogs.

“I just find it so disheartening,” said Shmyr. “It’s like, what happened to them? How come I don’t have the option to look at them and take them?”

Shmyr’s last dog died in May 2015, and she was looking forward to finally having a dog in her life again.
“It was very traumatic for me,” she said. “Just within the last month, my husband and I decided we were ready to get another dog. I was planning on spending the weekend with them. You get all these ideas in your head of what you’re going to do, but then it didn’t happen.”

Shmyr is still hoping to locate the dogs and bring them home with her.
“The dog control website says the dogs go to the SPCA when the SCPA has room, so I’m going to call them every day,” she said.

Source: http://www.kelownadailycourier.ca/news/article_c8c5fedc-ec8f-11e5-9d4a-9b7c84aeba88.html

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.pdf icon March 31, 2016 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

2016-2020 Financial Plan Adopted

The Regional Board has adopted its 2016-2020 Financial Plan bylaw. The 2016 budget totals just over $63.1-milllion which includes $29.2-million for operations, $4.2-million for future infrastructure and capital projects and $29.7-million for Municipal Finance Authority payments. View the details at www.regionaldistrict.com/budgets.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 31, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (84.4 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 Director of Finance - Third draft report and Item 5.3 2016-2020 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1388 - .wma (11.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.3 2016-2020 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1388 - public comment on dog control budget - .wma (2.86 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.3 Financial Plan Bylaw motion - .wma (191 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.4 Temporary Borrowing Bylaw - .wma (255 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Given mentioning about letters for the board to read - .wma (120 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Carson re: letter from the Ratepayers - .wma (1.36 MB)

.pdf icon March 31, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 5.1 Director of Finance - Third draft report

.pdf icon Item 5.3 2016-2020 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1388

.pdf icon Item 5.4 Temporary Borrowing Bylaw

.pdf icon Letter from the Ratepayers

.pdf icon Item 5.1 A Budget Presentation
.pdf icon Item 5.1 B Budget Summary Tab 6 Pg 1 To 14
.pdf icon Item 5.1 C Tax Requisitions And Rates Tab 7 Pg 1 To 17
.pdf icon Item 5.1 D Community Services Engineering Services Tab 8 Pg 1 To 34
.pdf icon Item 5.1 E Community Services Solid Waste Management Tab 8 Pg 36 To 42
.pdf icon Item 5.1 F Community Services Planning Tab 8 Pg 43 To 46
.pdf icon Item 5.1 G Community Services Fire Protection Tab 8 Pg 47 To 65
.pdf icon Item 5.1 H Community Services Policing Services Tab 8 Pg 66 To 73
.pdf icon Item 5.1 I Community Services Inspections Tab 8 Pg 74 To 77
.pdf icon Item 5.1 J Parks Services Tab 8 Pg 78 To 90
.pdf icon Item 5.1 K Finance And Administration Tab 8 Pg 91 To 121
.pdf icon Item 5.1 L Corporate Services Tab 8 Pg 122 To 141
.pdf icon Item 5.1 M Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement Tab 8 Pg 142 To 153
.pdf icon Item 5.1 N Economic Development Commission Tab 8 Pg 154 To 155
.pdf icon Item 5.1 O Regional Board Tab 8 Pg 156 To 165
.pdf icon Item 5.1 P Community Works Fund Projects Tab 9
.pdf icon Item 5.1 Q Service Participation By Member Tab 11
.pdf icon Central Okanagan Regional Hospital District Board Meeting Agenda March 31 2016

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 31, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (84.4 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 Director of Finance - Third draft report and Item 5.3 2016-2020 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1388 - .wma (11.2 MB)

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.pdf icon March 31, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

5.2 Public Comment on the RDCO 2016 - 2020 Budget and Financial Plan
Chair Given asked if there were any citizens in the gallery who wished to comment on the Financial Plan. Three formal public input opportunities (including today) have been provided.
The following comments were received:
- Sharon Schnurr, Central Okanagan West - North Westside Resident commented on the cost of dog control service and believes the gross operating costs per dog complaint has increased with no change in service.
- North Westside Ratepayers Association letter dated March 30 commented on increases to electoral area planning and budgeted ‘study funds’ for the electoral area.
There were no other comments from the public.
5.3 Regional District of Central Okanagan 2016-2020 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1388, 2016 - 1st, 2nd and 3rd readings and Adoption [All Directors – Weighted Vote - LGA 210(1)]
#79/16 BAKER/FINDLATER
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan 2016-2020 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1388, 2016 be given first, second and third readings and adopted.
CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 31, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (84.4 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 31, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 Director of Finance - Third draft report and Item 5.3 2016-2020 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1388 - .wma (11.2 MB)

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SKYROCKETING DOG CONTROL COSTS

The cost for dog control just keeps going up, the more money they collect, the more they spend, and the less they hire any new dog control officer positions.  Its the same number of FTE's (Full Time Equivalent) this year as last year.  Every other year the number of FTE's (dog control jobs) goes up, except this year?  We have the poorest 3 managers of dog control than we have had in the last 10 years.

Gross Operating Cost per Complaint for Dog Control
2007 - $266.15
2008 - $335.87
2009 - $482.94
2010 - $457.17

OUR Estimated Gross Operating Cost per Complaint for Dog Control
1,043,365 revenue divided by 2,857 complaints in 2011 = $365.20 gross operating cost per complaint
1,096,468 revenue divided by 2,363 complaints in 2012 = $464.02 gross operating cost per complaint
1,269,319 revenue divided by 2,386 complaints in 2013 = $531.99 gross operating cost per complaint
1,477,774 revenue divided by 2,314 complaints in 2014 = $638.62 gross operating cost per complaint
1,531,865 actual revenue divided by 1,793 complaints in 2015 = $854.36 gross operating cost per complaint
1,348,907 budget revenue divided by 1,793 complaints in 2016 = $752.32 gross operating cost per complaint
If there were 2,314 complaints in 2016 it would be $582.93 gross operating cost per complaint

To get the gross operating cost per complaint you take the revenue and divide it by the number of complaints.

Think we need to stop hiring Dog Consultants because the last Dog Consultant RDCO hired back in 2012 cost us close to $100,000, and dog complaints are only getting more expensive to deal with ever since.

Dog Control FTE's
2016 10.710
2015 10.710
2014 10.460
2013 9.138
2012 8.83
2011 8.78

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.pdf icon March 10, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 5.1 Okanagan Wetland Strategy Presentation
.pdf icon Item 6.1 2016 2020 Financial Plan Presentation
.pdf icon Item 6.1 2016 2020 Financial Plan Staff Report
.pdf icon Item 6.1A Budget Summary Tab 6 Pg 1 To 14
.pdf icon Item 6.1B Tax Requisitions And Rates Tab 7 Pg 1 To 17
.pdf icon Item 6.1C Engineering Services Tab 8 Pg 1 To 34
.pdf icon Item 6.1D Community Services Solid Waste Management Tab 8 Pg 35 To 42
.pdf icon Item 6.1E Community Services Planning Tab 8 Pg 43 To 46
.pdf icon Item 6.1F Community Services Fire Protection Tab 8 Pg 47 To 65
.pdf icon Item 6.1G Community Services Policing Services Tab 8 Pg 66 To 73
.pdf icon Item 6.1H Community Services Inspections Tab 8 Pg 74 To 77
.pdf icon Item 6.1I Parks Services Tab 8 Pg 78 To 90
.pdf icon Item 6.1J Finance And Administration Tab 8 Pg 91 To 121
.pdf icon Item 6.1K Corporate Services Tab 8 Pg 122 To 141
.pdf icon Item 6.1L Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement Tab 8 Pg 142 To 153
.pdf icon Item 6.1M Economic Development Commission Tab 8 Pg 154 To 155
.pdf icon Item 6.1N Regional Board Tab 8 Pg 156 To 165
.pdf icon Item 6.1O Community Works Fund Projects Tab 9
.pdf icon Item 6.1P Service Participation By Member Tab 11 Pg 1 Tp 4
.pdf icon Item 6.2 Proposed Flood Protection Project Presentation

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 10, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (194 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 10, 2016 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 5.1 Okanagan Wetland Strategy Presentation - .wma (5.63 MB)

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Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 10, 2016 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about a new alternate for Director Hanson, Director Mark Bartick (not sure how its spelled)  - .wma (499 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 10, 2016 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Director Carson about the California Big Horn Sheep - .wma (1.0 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 10, 2016 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Director Findlater in regards to dog control costs - .wma (2.37 MB)

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.pdf icon March 10, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Minutes

Minutes of the RDCO Governance and Services Committee meetings are not usually posted to RDCO's website until after the following meeting which would be March 10th, 2016.  If the minutes are not posted here yet, you can check RDCO's website to see if they are posted there yet.  If you want a copy of the minutes before then, contact RDCO who will have a copy of the minutes at their office within 7 days after you request a copy of the minutes.  This is in accordance to Local Government Act Procedure Bylaws and Enforcement section 794 (5) and Community Charter Other records to which public access must be provided section 97 (2).

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 10, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (194 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 10, 2016 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 5.1 Okanagan Wetland Strategy Presentation - .wma (5.63 MB)

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New dog park sites identified in Kelowna after city survey
Infotel.ca - By John McDonald - March 18, 2016

SURVEY SHOWS MAJORITY SEE NEED FOR NEW DOG BEACH NEAR DOWNTOWN

KELOWNA - Kelowna has identified eight new possible dog park and beachsites from a survey conducted just last month.

With pressure on to expand the dog park system, city councillors will hear from planner Barb Davidson how the eight sites were chosen and how plans are to winnow them down even more.

The survey shows 38 per cent of Kelowna residents own at least one dog and represent of the largest user groups of the parks system, according to Davidson’s report.

Public opinion is divided on the need for another dog park, Davidson says, but the majority agree the city needs another dog beach and would support a small property tax increase to help pay for it.

Just over half believe there are enough dog parks in the city but 55 per cent think there’s a need for more lake access for dogs.

Downtown is where most people would prefer to see an off-leash dog beach followed by the Mission and the North End.

The possible beach parks include city-owned land around the Cedar Avenue beach access, the Lake Avenue beach access beside the Bennett Bridge or across from Knox Mountain Park on Poplar Drive. The beach acces at 1844 Dewdney Rd. in McKinley Landing and the 'mini-beach' downtown near the Sails plaza are also on the list.

Possible inland park locations include the soon-to-be constructed Glenmore Recreation Park on Valley Road, a portion of Knox Mountain Park East or a section of the Clement Avenue rail corridor between Gordon Drive and Spall Road. A section of Munson Pond Park near KLO Road rounds out the list.

Davidson points out 44 per cent of Kelowna residents would support a new dog beach, more than the number of households that own dogs.

Kelowna’s only legal dog beach is at Cedar Creek Park about 20 kilometres from downtown Kelowna, a distance that has been criticized in previous surveys.

The Southwest/Mission part of the city has the highest concentration of dog owners (44 per cent) followed closely by Downtown/Central (43 per cent).

The statistically valid survey was conducted by NRG Research Group.

Staff are seeking council approval to take the public consultation process a step further by surveying residents in closer proximity to the possible sites. A short list of possible sites and the cost associated with each will returned to council for consideration in the 2017 city budget.

Source: http://infotel.ca/newsitem/new-dog-park-sites-identified-in-kelowna-after-city-survey/it28789/kelowna

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Letter: Off-leash dogs a threat to Crawford walkers and residents
Kelowna Capital News - Mar 16, 2016

To the editor:

I live near Crawford and walk in the local parks almost daily and am also increasingly affected by off-leash dogs in what are supposedly on-leash parks.

I love walking the trails and ridges, but have started to avoid them out of fear as the dog problem continues to escalate. Mission Ridge Linear Park in particular has become bad—I have been threatened, held at bay, jumped on, bruised, scraped and even bit.

Owners assure me their dogs are ‘friendly’ or rationalize that ‘he’s just a puppy,’ or the classic, ignore me after calling desperately for their dog who is bounding towards me barking frantically. It can be terrifying at worst, and frustrating at best. My children are afraid to walk with me. Considerate dog owners who do leash their dogs, are often also bothered by the off-leash dogs.

In many cases people will drive to our neighbourhood and let their dogs out of the vehicle without a leash, and thus we have also had dogs running into our yard and down the street. My son was also threatened by one such dog while walking to school. The owner, who never did apologize, had to pull his dog away from my son who had been backed up against a hedge.

I have been in contact with Bylaws on several occasions, and while they have been understanding, I have yet to see any patrols in the area. I ask anyone experiencing similar problems to contact Bylaws and RDCO and perhaps even Kelowna city hall, so that these parks can be used and enjoyed by all, not just by off-leash dogs and their owners.

Marguerite Veenstra, Kelowna

Source: http://www.kelownacapnews.com/opinion/letters/372241611.html

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Jan 5, 2016 we noticed a lone California Big Horn Sheep alongside Westside Road right at the turn off for Estamont.  We stopped and took two photos before we carried on.  The Vernon Morning Star said the black dog attacked the sheep in Dec., but maybe it was in January, if this sheep was still standing on Jan 5, 2016, or it was another sheep?

 


You can see the yellow and black sign in the distance, which is the turn off to Estamont on the left.  This is heading towards Kelowna.

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Dogs chase sheep to death
Castanet.net - Carmen Weld - Feb 23, 2016 | Story: 159173

The B.C. Conservation Service is urging Westside Road residents to keep a look out for dogs it believes are responsible for the deaths of two bighorn sheep.

In two separate recent incidents, two large dogs, one described as brown and one as black, were seen chasing a bighorn sheep along the water near the Estamont Beach subdivision.

“We had two incidents there about a week apart from one another,” said conservation officer Dave Cox.

In the first incident, Cox says a woman called to report a sheep dead in the lake.

“She stated there were some dogs roaming up and down the beach, trying to get at the sheep, but the sheep was dead off shore a little bit,” said Cox. “We asked her if she knew who the dogs belonged to, but she didn't know.”

A week later, a second call came in from a man who described a similar incident.

“He had a very good description of the two dogs, but had no idea where the dogs came from. He had lived in the area for quite some time, but couldn't pin them to any property owner or dog owner,” said Cox.

Conservation officers believe the dogs chased the sheep into the water, not allowing it back to shore.

“The speculation is that they chased it and pursued it into the water and then kept it off shore so it probably drowned, versus the sheep actually being attacked or killed by the dogs.”

Cox hopes residents around Nerie Road and Estamont will watch for the dogs.

“If you see these dogs, a week later, a month later, in someone's possession or at someone's property – the file will remain open. We need to determine who is responsible for these dogs,” he said.

The Conservation Service wants to ensure the dog owner is held responsible and aware of the issue, but he notes, they do not want to harm the dogs.

“Dogs at large, essentially chasing wildlife or killing wildlife, can be put down by conservation officers or RCMP – but we don't want to go there."

“We just want to ensure these people are educated and control their dogs, that's our main approach.”

The owners could face fines of $345, he added.

If you see the dogs, or any wildlife in distress, call 1-877-952-7277.

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Vernon/159173/Dogs-chase-sheep-to-death

Blue Divider Line

Reports of dogs chasing bighorn sheep to death in the Okanagan
By Charlotte Helston - (JENNIFER STAHN /InfoTel Multimedia) - February 27, 2016

California bighorn sheep herds in the Okanagan have been impacted by habitat loss, historical over-hunting, the invasion of invasive plants affecting forage. According to the Ministry of Environment, sheep survival depends on familiarity with their habitat and they are slow to re-occupy vacant habitats.

PET OWNERS REMINDED OF CONSEQUENCES, FINES

VERNON - The B.C. Conservation Service is investigating reports of dogs chasing California bighorn sheep to their deaths in the Westside Road area and warns that owners are liable for fines and even court charges if pets are caught pursuing wildlife.

Since January 2016, conservation officers received two separate reports of dogs chasing bighorn sheep in residential communities on Westside Road, near Fintry. The sheep — two in all — were either found dead or had to be put down, conservation officer Mike Stern says.

“Members of the public witnessed a dog biting at the sheep,” Stern says of the second incident, which occurred Tuesday, Feb. 23.

He says the dogs didn’t directly kill the sheep by attacking them, but likely contributed to the deaths by distressing them.

Dogs chasing wild animals is punishable under the Wildlife Act, starting with a minimum $345 fine and potentially escalating to court, where penalties can reach the $1,000 range.

Conservation has stepped up patrols in the Westside area, and Stern says they’ve been able to identify the owner of the dog involved in the Feb. 23 incident.

“The investigation is still ongoing but enforcement action will be taken,” Stern says.

Not enough information was provided in the first incident to further an investigation, and Stern is reminding the public to make thorough, timely reports when they witness such an offence.

“Usually what happens is we get these reports after the fact and it’s very hard to follow up on it. When people see a dog chasing wildlife we need to be 100 per cent sure of whose dog it is. If people report it they need an accurate description, and if they can, get a tag off the dog.”

Reports of dogs chasing sheep, deer and other wildlife are a common issue for the conservation service, and Stern is reminding owners to control and keep an eye on their pets.

“Most people don’t intentionally let their dogs do it, they’re almost ignorant to the fact their dogs are doing it and are quite surprised when we show up and advise them of what happened,” Stern says.

The main concern is the welfare of the animal, but Stern adds injured wildlife can run into traffic and cause accidents as well.

He says many people who leave their dogs outside on acreages while they go to work or let their dog out of sight while on a hike might not even be aware their dog is chasing wildlife.

“If your dog disappears and you don’t know where it’s been, if it comes home with blood on its mouth or is panting it’s a good indication it might be chasing wildlife,” Stern says.

If conservation catches a dog in the act, Stern warns the dog could be put down.

“That’s the last thing we want to do,” he says.

Anyone who sees a dog chasing wildlife can call the Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) line at 1-877-952-727 or file a report online.

To contact a reporter for this story, email Charlotte Helston at chelston "at" infonews.ca or call 250-309-5230. To contact the editor, email mjone "at" @infonews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

Source: http://infotel.ca/newsitem/reports-of-dogs-chasing-bighorn-sheep-to-death-in-the-okanagan/it28127

Blue Divider Line

Bighorn sheep killed by dogs
by Richard Rolke - Vernon Morning Star - Feb 26, 2016

Public help is being sought after dogs were responsible for killing California bighorn sheep.

In two separate cases in mid-December, the bodies of wild sheep were found in Okanagan Lake in the Estamont area of North Westside.

“It’s been a challenging situation,” said Dave Cox, conservation officer, of the investigation.

In the first case, a woman found a dead sheep in the lake near Nerie Road, with two dogs pacing along the beach. A few days later, a man came across dogs chasing a sheep into the water.

“We have had proactive patrols to identify the dogs and we are seeking public assistance,” said Cox.

It’s possible the sheep were exhausted after being chased by the dogs, ran into the water for safety and drowned.

“The dogs could have kept them offshore,” said Cox.

Dogs chasing wildlife are a common problem throughout the region.

“We need dog owners to be responsible,” said Cox.

If the owners of the two North Westside dogs were identified, they could face $345 fines.

“If they are repeat offenders, there could be court action,” said Cox.

And in extreme case, dogs found to be repeatedly stalking wildlife can be destroyed.

Cox hopes awareness about the December cases will lead to public tips.

“These dogs belong somewhere and people know where they belong,” he said.

Anyone with information about wildlife being harassed by dogs can call 1-877-952-7277.

The California bighorn sheep population is limited to just a few areas of the Okanagan because of habitat reduction, changes in predation mortality and historical hunting trends.

“The invasion of non-native plants, intensive cattle grazing, fire suppression, timber harvesting, and land development are factors that have limited access to forage plants,” states the Ministry of Environment.

“Sheep survival depends on familiarity with their habitat and they are slow to re-occupy vacant habitat.”

Source: http://www.vernonmorningstar.com/news/370159731.html

See photos below that we took of the sheeps carcass laying on the beach, just scroll down a bit till you see them

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FEB 20, 2016 UPDATE RE: DEAD CALIFORNIA BIG HORN SHEEP ON THE BEACH AT FOREST HOUSE


Looking North towards Vernon, you can see the North Westside Road Fire Rescue's red Boat House.
The two red circles mark where the one California Big Horned Sheep's carcass was still laying on February 20, 2016.  We were told that the other California Big Horned Sheep that was seen being attacked by a black dog on the South end of Estamont, was cleaned up by the property owner.

 


This is looking South towards Kelowna.
The two red circles mark where the carcass of the dead California Big Horned Sheep lay on the Beach at Forest House.
We first reported that this was at Estamont Beach but, we were told this is North of Estamont Beach at Forest House.  The other California Big Horned Sheep that someone seen the black dog attacking was at Estamont Beach on the South end.  The ribs and spine are laying in the farthest red circle, and the hide with the leg attached in the photo below is in the closest red circle.

 


This is a photo of the spine and ribs and a portion of the leg of the California Big Horned Sheep, that nobody seen how it died, so not sure that it was attacked by the black dog.  It could have died of natural causes for all we know.

 


This is a photo of the leg of the California Big Horned Sheep, that was laying near the ribs and spine.

 


This is a photo of the remainder of the hide with one leg still attached, of the California Big Horned Sheep that we took on Feb 20, 2016.
 

FEB 16, 2016 UPDATE ABOUT THE BLACK DOG THAT KILLED A CALIFORNIA BIG HORN SHEEP BELOW

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Below you can see two different schedules for fine amounts.  One is for Municipal tickets which is for more extreme incidents like for dangerous dogs, and the other fine schedule is for Bylaw Notices under the Bylaw Adjudication program which are for more minor incidents.

.pdf icon February 22, 2016 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw Updated
The Regional Board has adopted the first amendments to the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw since it was introduced in early 2014. The bylaw encourages and supports dog owners to be responsible by licensing each year and controlling their dog at all times in order to reduce potential conflicts with people and other animals. Among the changes: increasing the number of dogs allowed from two to three; opportunities for owners of nuisance and aggressive dogs to have a second chance and have their designations removed after a period of time without further incidents; increased license fees for dogs deemed nuisance, aggressive and dangerous; and increased fines for dogs at large/fail to leash in public places and in parks that are not designated off-leash. As well, fines and impound maintenance fees have been increased for violations affecting owners of dangerous dogs.

Nothing was mentioned in the Board Highlights about Item 8.1 2015 Year In Review Surplus Deficits

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 22, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (367 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 2015 Year In Review Surplus Deficits - .wma (10.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.1 Dog Control Revenues And Licensing Update - .wma (320 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.2 Amendments To Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343 - .wma (24.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.3 Amendments To Ticket Information And Utilization Bylaw No 435 And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No 1326 - .wma (7.45 MB)

.pdf icon February 22, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 8.1 2015 Year In Review Surplus Deficits

.pdf icon Item 9.1 Dog Control Revenues And Licensing Update

.pdf icon Item 9.2 Amendments To Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343

.pdf icon Item 9.3 Amendments To Ticket Information And Utilization Bylaw No 435 And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No 1326

*Note* Below are only snippets, please click links above for entire content

Item 8.1 2015 Year in Review Surplus Deficits
046 Dog Control - 15% higher revenue than budgeted due to increase in licenses and Bylaw tickets. Reduced spending due to employee leaves and related costs. Increase in legal.

=====================================

Item 9.1 Dog Control Revenues And Licensing Update
Purpose: To provide the Board with actual revenues for the Dog Control Services 20102015.
Executive Summary:
A request for information on Dog Control revenues has been made by the Board. Attached are current statistics for revenue from 2010 - 2015 showing a reduction in tax requisitions:
2010 - 65.13% to 2015 - 54.05%. Staff believes this reduction will continue as dog owners license their dogs (estimate there are 30,000-39,000 dogs in the Central Okanagan).
During this period of time licensing has increased from 11,155 in 2010 to 21,707 in 2015 (of note, 2,400 licenses from 2014 were not renewed in 2015 and staff are following up with these owners). Dog licenses issued from 2003 to 2015 is presented for information.
Of interest, to date $178,109 in licenses have been sold on-line-in 2015 during the same period of time $122,740 had been sold. Licenses sold at the municipalities and SPCA has increased this year as well.
The dog control service review was completed in 2012 and implementation of the new model for responsible dog ownership began in 2013, and zero tolerance for not having a license in 2014.
Since that time licensing has significantly increased.
RECOMMENDATION:
THAT the Regional Board receive for information the Dog Control Revenues - 2010-2015 Actuals and Dog Licenses Issued 2003-2015.

Dog Control Revenues
RDCO Dog Control Revenue 2010 - 2015
Click for a larger copy


Dog Control Licencing
(estimate there are 30,000-39,000 dogs in the Central Okanagan with 21,707 dogs licenced in 2015 = an estimated 8,293 - 17,293 dogs that are unlicenced).  At $20 per neutered or spayed dog, if they were all neutered and spayed, that would be $165,860 - $345,860 in lost revenue just for licencing.

RDCO Dog Control Licencing 2003 - 2015
Click for a larger copy

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Item 9.2 Amendments To Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343

SUBJECT: Amendments to the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No, 1343
Purpose: To propose amendments to the Regional District's Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343
Executive Summary:
The Regional Board adopted a new responsible dog ownership bylaw in February 2014. The bylaw is a 'living document' and as such amendments will be recommended as required. The bylaw has been seen by many jurisdictions as a leading enforcement bylaw for dog control.
Since adopted, staff has had the opportunity to review what changes would further enhance the bylaw.
Recommended amendments to Bylaw 1343 and the ticketing bylaws (No, 435 & No. 1326) include: increase in licensing for nuisance, aggressive and dangerous dogs; increase in the maximum number of dogs allowed; nuisance and aggressive dog owners given a 'second chance' to control their dogs; increasing fines for at-large dogs/fail to leash in public places and
in parks; and increased fines for dangerous dogs.
Dogs at-large and unleashed dogs cause the majority of complaints including attacks on people and other animals. Enforcement and holding the owner responsible is critical to ensure public safety.
RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Amendment Bylaw be given first, second and third readings and adopted

Background:
Central Okanagan Dog Control Services work with, supports and encourages responsible dog owners across the entire Regional District. It is recognized that most dog owners follow the principles of responsible dog ownership by being in the care and control of their pet and in doing so, act as a good neighbour in handling their dog on and off their property. They license their dog(s), leash it in public, pick up their dog waste and keep it under their care and control at all times. Any dog owner exhibiting responsible behavior should have no problem complying with the requirements of the bylaw.
The following amendments are being recommended at this time:
Definitions
Owners of nuisance and aggressive dogs are being given a second chance to take steps to be responsible with controlling their dog's behaviour. In the current bylaw, if a dog is declared a 'nuisance' or 'aggressive' it is for the life of the dog.
During the last two years, and in discussion with owners who have had their dog declared aggressive, it has become evident that in some cases the incident which occurred has been a 'wake-up call' for the owner. The incident may have been a 'one-off, they have taken steps to become better informed of their dogs behaviour, may have enrolled in dog
training, and as better informed guardians of their dog become more responsible to help ensure further incidents don't occur.
Aggressive dog incidents can cause injury to a person or animal but are considered minor compared to dangerous dog attacks which falls under Section 49 of the Community Charter and which cause serious injury or death to a human or domestic animal.
As a tool, Dr. Ian Dunbar's Dog Bite Scale is used when investigating dog bites. An aggressive incident falls within the following evaluation: obnoxious or aggressive behaviour but no skin-contact by teeth; skin contact by teeth but no skin-puncture; or a single bite with no puncture deeper than half the length of the dog's canine teeth; maybe lacerations caused by victim pulling hand away, owner pulling dog away, or gravity (dog jumps, bites and drops to the floor).
If, after three years, a dog declared aggressive has no further incidents, the aggressive designation would be removed. A nuisance dog designation would be removed after one year. This provides owners and their dogs with a second chance.
Increase in 3 dogs per property
Various local governments have regulations allowing more than 2 dogs, or no limit. For example, Vancouver - 3 dog limit; Fraser Valley Regional District ~ 3 dog limit; Capital Regional District - 3 dog limit; Calgary - no limit; Winnipeg - 4 dog limit.
Staff believes that if an owner is responsible for the care and control of their pet increasing the number of dogs will not be an issue, and if it is, the bylaw is there to hold an owner accountable. Additionally, landlords, strata corporations, and condo/apartment buildings provide their own regulations on whether dogs are permitted, often including the size and number of pets permitted. It is known there are owners who currently have three dogs and enforcement issues have not been a concern.
• Leashing
Part 6 - Dogs At Large Prohibited - further clarifies that when in anywhere public (ie: sidewalks, roadways, stores, public buildings) dog owners must keep their dog leashed and held by the Owner.
• Microchip Dangerous Dogs
Provides a deadline of 15 days for an Owner to get their dog micro-chipped and subsequently a fine ($300) for failing to do so. It is important a dangerous dog can be identified should it be at large, or go missing.
• Licensing
The current bylaw does not allow for increased licensing fees for dogs that have been designated due to their behaviour.
Various local governments have moved to increase license fees for these designations.
Nuisance: Abbottsford & Edmonton $100;
Aggressive: Delta $210 altered, $510 unaltered, Maple Ridge $200, Port Moody $235
Dangerous: Delta $210 altered, $510 unaltered, Merritt $1,000, Port Moody $494.20, Surrey $258,
Staff is recommending the following license fees for dogs designated as:
                    Altered Unaltered
Nuisance Dog $40 $80
Aggressive Dog $100 $140
Dangerous Dog $500 $500
A $20 late fee (if license not renewed as of March 1st) would apply to each category.


Other Licensing Fees:
At year-end 2014 (19,815) to year-end 2015 (21,707) licenses were sold. But, we still have a way to go-it is believed there are more than 30,000-39,000 dogs in the Central Okanagan.
At this time, staff is not recommending any change to 'regular' license fees for unaltered or altered dogs. The Dog Control Technical Advisory Committee supports this recommendation and believes it is too early to consider increasing license fees. Emphasis needs to continue to get all dogs licensed in the Central Okanagan. This will increase the revenues required for the service to be more 'self-supporting'.
For the Board's information results to a survey done in 2014 regarding licensing include:
• 91 % of respondents don't support any increase in license fees from the current level. 60% of respondents support the $20 late fee for people who don't renew by the end of February.
• Should there be higher license fees for dogs declared Nuisance Dogs, 39% said yes and 61 % said no. For Aggressive Dogs, 52% of respondents said yes and 48% said no. For dogs declared Dangerous, just over 59% said yes, while 40% said no.


click for a larger copy

========================================================

Item 9.3 Amendments To Ticket Information And Utilization Bylaw No 435 And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No 1326

SUBJECT: Amendment to RDCO Ticketing Bylaws
Purpose: To propose amendments to the Regional District's Ticket and Utilization Bylaw No. 435 and Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No. 1326
Executive Summary:
Staff is recommending amendments to the Regional District's two ticket bylaws (Bylaw No. 435 and Bylaw No. 1326) for the following regulation bylaws: RDCO Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343, RDCO Water Systems Regulations Bylaw No. 1370 and RDCO Prohibited Animal Bylaw No. 1028.
RECOMMENDATION #1 :
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw be given first, second and third readings and adopted.
RECOMMENDATION #2:
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw be given first, second and third readings and adopted.

Legal/Statutory Authority: RDCO Ticket and Utilization Bylaw No. 435
RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No. 1326
Background:
Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw - increases to the ticket bylaw are proposed for the following sections to:
o Section 25 - Dogs at large and owners failing to leash
• Current $150, 1st offence remains at $150, add: 2nd offence $200, 3rd and subsequent offence $300
o Section 27 - Owners failing to leash dogs in leashed park
• Current $100, increase 1sl offence to $150 (same as fail to leash in public/or at-large)
o Section 28c) - Owners failing to maintain visual sight and verbal control of dog at all times while in an off-leash park and area. Incidents of aggression in off-leash dog parks are increasing as some owners do not supervise their dogs while in the park.
• Current $100, increase to $200
Increase in fines related to Dangerous Dogs:
Dangerous dog owners need to be held accountable for the actions of their dogs. Increased
staff resources are required to investigate attacks and defend the ticketable offence.
o Section 36 - Municipal Ticket Offence for Dangerous Dogs
• Current $500, increase to $1,000.
o Section 37 - Dangerous Dog in Prohibited Area
• Current $200 (the same as aggressive dogs), increase to $500
o Section 39 - Failure to control/enclosure Dangerous Dog
• Current $500, increase to $1,000
o Section 40 &41 - Failure to post signage or microchip a Dangerous Dog
• Current $200, increase to $300

RDCO Prohibited Animal Bylaw No. 1028
In 2015, investigation was requested in regards to a fire where prohibited animals (snakes) had been kept. The current fine structure for prohibited animals is $100--hardly a deterrent to individuals who choose to keep prohibited animals. Staff are recommending that all fines be increased to $1,000, and obstructing a Bylaw Enforcement Officer increase from $200 to $500.

Alternative Recommendation:
The Board may choose to not support, or change the amount, of a specific ticket offence being recommended.

Attachment(s): Regional District's Ticket and Utilization Amendment Bylaw
Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw Amendment Bylaw

Municipal Ticket Offence Fine Amounts for RDCO Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw #1343
Municipal Ticket Offence Fine Amounts for RDCO Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw #1343
click for a larger copy

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 22, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (367 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 2015 Year In Review Surplus Deficits - .wma (10.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.1 Dog Control Revenues And Licensing Update - .wma (320 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.2 Amendments To Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343 - .wma (24.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.3 Amendments To Ticket Information And Utilization Bylaw No 435 And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No 1326 - .wma (7.45 MB)

.pdf icon February 22, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

8. FINANCIAL SERVICES

8.1 2015 Year In Review Surplus Deficits (All Directors – Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated February 17, 2016 outlined the 2015 surplus-deficits for the various services the Regional District provides. Staff reviewed the report noting that many of the deficits have already been dealt with by the Board. The new water rates will address deficits in the Falconridge and Trepanier Bench Water Systems. It was noted that surplus/deficits must remain within its’ own service.

A video highlighting some of 2015 accomplishments in the various service areas
was shown.

#49/16 BAKER/STACK

THAT the Board receive for information the 2015 Year In Review financial surplus
deficits report.

CARRIED Unanimously

====================

9. CORPORATE SERVICES

9.1 Dog Control Revenues 2010 - 2015 and Dog Licensing 2003 – 2015 Update (All Directors – Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated February 16, 2016 outlined dog control service revenues from 2010 through to 2015 show a reduction in tax requisitions: 2010 – 65.13% to 2015 – 54.05%. During this same period of time licensing increased from 11,155 to 21,707.

#50/16 FORTIN/GRAY

THAT the Regional Board receive for information the Dog Control Revenues 2010-2015 Actuals and Dog Licenses issued 2003 – 2015.

CARRIED Unanimously

=====================

9.2 Amendments to the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 (All Directors – Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated February 9, 2016 outlined proposed amendments to the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw.

. Increase in number of dogs permitted from 2 to 3
. increase in licensing for nuisance, aggressive and dangerous dogs
. nuisance and aggressive dog owners given a ‘second chance’ to control their dogs
. increasing fines for at-large dogs, fail to leash in public and in on-leash parks
. increase in fines for dangerous dogs.

Staff provided an overview of the amendments. Discussion ensued regarding the proposed increase in the number of dogs per house or dwelling unit from two to three.

#51/16 BASRAN/CARSON

THAT the Regional Board approves the increase in the number of dogs allowed per house or dwelling unit from two to three.

CARRIED (Opposed: Findlater, Ophus)

#52/16 BASRAN/STACK

THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Amendment Bylaw No. 1385, 2016 be given first, second and third readings and adopted.

CARRIED (Opposed: Findlater, Ophus)

======================

9.3 Amendments to RDCO Ticket Information and Utilization Bylaw No. 435 & RDCO Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No. 1326

Staff report dated February 9, 2016 outlined the proposed amendments to the two ticketing bylaws. Increases in fines are for dogs at large, owners failing to leash, owners failing to maintain visual sight and verbal control of their dog when in an off-leash park, and dangerous dogs. A fine structure is introduced for the newly adopted RDCO Water Systems Regulations Bylaw No. 1370. Increased fines from $100 to $1000 were proposed for the RDCO Prohibited Animal Bylaw No. 1028.

Staff recommended an increase for Section 37 - Dangerous Dog in Prohibited Area fine from $200 to $500. In discussion, it was agreed that the fine should be increased to $1,000, similar to the other fines related to dangerous dogs. For the safety of the public, dangerous dogs should never be allowed in the prohibited areas which include parks, schools grounds, sports fields, playgrounds, public beaches, swimming areas, and off-leash parks.

#53/16 OPHUS/BAKER

THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1386, 2016 be given first, second and third readings and adopted, as amended:

. Section 37 Dangerous Dog in Prohibited Area increase fine from $500 to $1,000

CARRIED Unanimously

#54/16 OPHUS/BAKER

THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No. 1387, 2016 be given first, second and third readings and adopted, as amended:

. Section 37 Dangerous Dog in Prohibited Area increase fine from $500 to $1,000

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 22, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (367 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 2015 Year In Review Surplus Deficits - .wma (10.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.1 Dog Control Revenues And Licensing Update - .wma (320 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.2 Amendments To Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343 - .wma (24.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 22, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 9.3 Amendments To Ticket Information And Utilization Bylaw No 435 And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Bylaw No 1326 - .wma (7.45 MB)

Blue Divider Line

Breed specific legislation doesn’t work
Peachland View - Letter to the Editor February 4th, 2016

In regard to the column “Stronger dog laws are needed to protect the community,” Peachland View, Jan. 29.

Once again, Lori Welbourne is misleading the public. Buddy is an American Bull Dog, not a pit bull, which breed specific legislation (BSL) does not include. Her statistics are not Canadian and do nothing but instill fear in the Canadian public. Just recently, the City of Cranbrook removed its BSL because it did nothing to prevent dog bites! Read this, please: blog.hugabull.com/xmasday/

Another thing Ms. Welbourne neglects to mention is that one of the bylaw terms which the RDCO wanted to include in Buddy’s release conditions was denied by Judge Wallace and that decision upheld by Justice Skolrood. They ruled that the bylaw provision requiring a dog be leashed and muzzled in his own securely fenced yard was “overwhelmingly onerous” and would only persuade a dog owner to euthanize his dog. Not only that but the RDCO continues to charge impound fees prior to the date of the provincial court hearing in direct contravention of two Supreme Court rulings! Isn’t it time the RDCO reviewed its bylaw and respected these judgments?

Here are some Canadian dog bite statistics that are peer reviewed and reliable: www.chicobandido.com/2015/02/dbrf-201502/.

And I guess we definitely need to ban Jack Russell terriers, too, after this recent attack: www.facebook.com/7newssydney/videos/1181397088551089/?fref=nf.

Karen Stiewe

Source: http://www.peachlandview.com/2016/02/04/breed-specific-legislation-doesnt-work/

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.pdf icon February 11, 2016 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Dog Control Licensing Update
The Regional Board has received a report updating the effort to increase licensed dogs across the Central Okanagan. The Dog Control Service model is based on Responsible Dog Ownership and the first condition is licensing as all dogs in the Central Okanagan must be licensed each year. In 2015, there were 21,707 dogs licensed, up from 12,778 in 2012. It’s estimated there may be 30,000 to 39,000 dogs in the region. The dog license audit will continue in 2016 to confirm the status of dogs that were previously licensed in 2014 but whose owners didn’t renew their license in 2015.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 11, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (243 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update - .wma (16.7 MB)

*Note* Below are just clips taken from the entire audio at the link above of Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Carson asking what happens when someone has 3 dogs and they are only allowed 2 dogs - .wma (742 KB)

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Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Carson asking for answers a resident asked in an email - .wma (217 KB)

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.pdf icon February 11, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

Some dog owners were fined while others were not. The answer lies not in whether the owner was present but rather the dog(s), Fines were issued when the officer viewed a dog matching the description of the dog(s) referenced on the 2014 license record. A Bylaw Offence Notices (BON) does not require personal service.

Unexpected Results - Due to the presence of the officers in neighbourhoods in the months of November and December, and the media coverage, 850 additional 'new' dogs have been licensed during this time period. Historically, the average new dogs licensed in those months has totaled 170. In addition, dog owners who haven't renewed their license prior to 2014 are now renewing (approximately 100 including a license from 20081) The media attention, social media posts, and staff presence in the community to educate and enforce accomplished exactly what a policy of zero tolerance and Allan Neilson envisioned would and should occur - compliance on a large scale.


click for a larger copy

In 2015 in Central Okanagan West
Licences = 180
Complaints = 33
Impounds = 2

Below we divided the # of dogs licenced in each area, by complaints or impounds

# of Dogs Licenced / Complaints by area
14,101 Kelowna 1,206 = on average one complaint every 11.69 dogs
4,239 West Kelowna 307 = on average one complaint every 13.81 dogs
1,894 Lake Country 164 = on average one complaint every 11.55 dogs
900 Peachland 59 = on average one complaint every 15.25 dogs
323 COE 15 = on average one complaint every 21.53 dogs
180 COW 33 = on average one complaint every 5.45 dogs

# of Dogs Licenced / Impounds
14,101 Kelowna 387 = on average one impound every 36.44 dogs
4,239 West Kelowna 75 = on average one impound every 56.52 dogs
1,894 Lake Country 41 = on average one impound every 46.20 dogs
900 Peachland 12 = on average one impound every 75 dogs
323 COE 4 = on average one impound every 80.75 dogs
180 COW 2 = on average one impound every 90 dogs

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 11, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (243 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update - .wma (16.7 MB)

*Note* Below are just clips taken from the entire audio at the link above of Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Carson asking what happens when someone has 3 dogs and they are only allowed 2 dogs - .wma (742 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray questioning, that it is more economical for dog officers to go door to door rather than doing a mailout in regards to not renewing a dog licence - .wma (252 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Carson asking for answers a resident asked in an email - .wma (217 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Dog Control Manager Mary Jane Drouin increasing licencing fees for dangerous and aggressive dogs - .wma (182 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Dog Control Manager Mary Jane Drouin - RDCO is trying to work towards the dog control service being user pay as much as possible - .wma (79.8 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Dog Control Manager Mary Jane Drouin - Licencing Statistics - .wma (2.32 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Findlater and Sieben asking for status on dog control financials and resources - .wma (440 KB)

.pdf icon February 11, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

8. CORPORATE SERVICES

8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update (All Directors -- Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated February 2, 2016 outlined the status of dog control licensing for 2015.
The service model for dog control is premised on responsible dog ownership.
To that end, Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 stipulates that 'An Owner shall, annually on or before the last day of February in each year, or as soon as his or her dog is three (3) months of age, obtain a license from the Regional District.'
The Board's policy is 'zero tolerance' for not having a dog licensed. This policy was implemented following a service review by Allan Neilson and implementation of various service recommendations in 2013.
In late 2015, it was determined that there were 2,400 unpaid dog licenses from 2014 leaving the status of the dog on each account in question. Dog Control staff commenced, as part of their regular duties, a license audit in mid-November 2015
visiting 900 homes before the holiday season. The goal is to update dog licensing data and seek compliance of licensing regulations.
Discussion ensued:
• It would seem fairer if dog owners were given notice to renew before zero tolerance fine is issued. If dog owner was home they received a fine, but if they weren't home may have had a chance to purchase the license before officer returned. It would still be 'zero tolerance' if license not purchased.
• Is it possible to implement a multi-year license? What would the financial/operational challenges be?
• On-line renewal process has greatly assisted renewing an annual license.
• Need to maximize revenue for the service arid be more user pay. Non-dog owners continue to subsidize the service.
• Continue with the audit but provide notice in advance before issuing a fine.
Seven days to renew or fine issued.
• Calgary's model for responsible dog ownership took 4-5 years for dog owners to 'get the message'. RDCO still working on getting the message out.
• Continue with zero tolerance as .it works but need some flexibility in how it is applied when doing the audit. Compliance is the goal.
• Is it possible to mail the ticket and have owner contact the District?
• There was a challenge in timing of the audit-'-need to start earlier in the year.
• Message needs to get out that 'every dog needs to be licensed, no matter what'.
• How staff conduct the audit is an operational issue. The Board has provided feedback on how they wish to see the audit continue to seek compliance.
STACK/BAKER
THAT the Dog Control Licensing Update be received for information;
AND FURTHER THAT staff undertake completing the unlicensed dog audit, by first delivering a notice to the dog owner providing seven (7) days to renew the license or a zero tolerance fine will be issued.
CARRIED (opposed Findlater, Sieben)

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 11, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (243 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update - .wma (16.7 MB)

*Note* Below are just clips taken from the entire audio at the link above of Item 8.1 Dog Control Licensing Update

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Carson asking what happens when someone has 3 dogs and they are only allowed 2 dogs - .wma (742 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray questioning, that it is more economical for dog officers to go door to door rather than doing a mailout in regards to not renewing a dog licence - .wma (252 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Carson asking for answers a resident asked in an email - .wma (217 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Dog Control Manager Mary Jane Drouin increasing licencing fees for dangerous and aggressive dogs - .wma (182 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Dog Control Manager Mary Jane Drouin - RDCO is trying to work towards the dog control service being user pay as much as possible - .wma (79.8 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Dog Control Manager Mary Jane Drouin - Licencing Statistics - .wma (2.32 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 11, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Findlater and Sieben asking for status on dog control financials and resources - .wma (440 KB)

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Dog park survey
Castanet.net - Contributed - Feb 2, 2016 | Story: 157632

Dog owners and non-dog owners alike may wonder, for different reasons, about the need for the city's dog park survey, on-line questionnaire, and eventual open houses. Dog owners may ask why their years-long appeal for more dog parks in residential communities, where they are needed, and for another dog beach, is being reviewed in tax-paid information gathering. Meanwhile, non-dog owners reading on-line statistics that claim 76% of greenspaces in Kelowna allow dogs on or off leash may well wonder if dog owners' demands are unreasonable.

If people are puzzled by the 76% figure, they need to realize that Parks in and around Kelowna, varying greatly in size, do not lend themselves well to meaningful statistical summaries. It is no comfort to dog owners to know that they can walk their dog on leash in Knox Mountain Park, or some other large park, when their local park prohibits them from such a mundane activity. Another misleading statistic, although technically true, is that there are nine dog parks in Kelowna, or 7.5 dog parks per 100,000 residents.

Dog parks vary in size from 0.32 hectares to 7.43 hectares, are unevenly distributed in the city, and together have an area of just 23.14 hectares, less than half the area of the Mission Sports Fields. With the exception of the 0.32 hectare dog park, the remaining 8 dog parks are listed as natural areas - meaning they are mowed on an as-needed basis. Two of the larger and well used dog parks in residential areas are temporary.

As there are no similar websites listing or summarizing the details of other parks and the facilities offered in them, perhaps the dog statistics are intended to dispel Kelowna's reputation for being unfriendly to dog owners. It may be that the city believes what is written on their dog park websites, which may also have persuaded non-dog owners into believing dog owners are treated reasonably well. Whatever the aims of the dog park statistics, it is time for the city and residents to re-examine parks and their uses, and to compare dog park numbers to the number of tennis courts, playgrounds, or sports fields that are offered in Kelowna's parks.

As it was easiest to find sports fields on the city's parks lists, I offer them for comparison purposes: Not counting fields on school grounds, there are at least 64 sports fields located in just 22 parks that are well distributed among Kelowna's residential sectors. Using the same 120,000 population as was used for dog parks, the 64 parks divided by 1.2, came to 53.33 sports fields per 100,000 residents. These are not maintained as natural areas, as most dog parks are, and no sports field is 0,32 hectares in size.

I hope this information will be helpful to dog-owners and non-dog owners alike when responding to the city's telephone survey, on-line questionnaire, and eventual open houses.

Helen Schiele

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Letters/157632/Dog-park-survey

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Kelowna starts sniffing around for a new dog park location
(JENNIFER STAHN /InfoTel Multimedia) - January 27, 2016

A SECOND DOG BEACH SEEN AS A PRIORITY BY SOME RESIDENTS

KELOWNA - In a process that’s sure to ruffle some fur, city planners have begun gathering public opinion on where to put the city’s next off-leash dog park.

Begining today, locals can have their say with an online poll on a subject that has proven politically contentious in the past, pitting increasing numbers of dog owners demanding facilities against residents who don’t necessarily want a dog park in their neighbourhood.

Along with the online poll will be a statistically valid phone survey conducted by NRG Research Group on behalf of the city. It will gauge tolerance and support for off-leash dog parks in local neighbourhoods and identify possible locations.

But dog owners shouldn’t get excited just yet. Staff say possible sites will have to be costed out and approved by council before any paws hit the ground, a process that will take months.

Previous surveys have identified a desire for another dog-friendly beach closer to downtown Kelowna than the only other dog beach in the city at Cedar Creek Park.

To contact a reporter for this story, email John McDonald at jmcdonald "at" infonews.ca or call 250-808-0143. To contact the editor, email mjones "at" infonews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

Source: http://infotel.ca/newsitem/kelowna-starts-sniffing-around-for-a-new-dog-park-location/it27228

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Owner of euthanized dangerous dog claims regional district threatened him with impound fees
Infotel.ca - By Adam Proskiw - January 22, 2016
 


Peachland resident Drew Panton and Buddy, one of two dogs that bit and seriously injured another dog Jan. 1, 2015.

PEACHLAND – The Peachland man whose appeal failed to save the life of his dog this week is accusing the Central Okanagan Regional District of using exhorbant impound fees to keep owners from appealing their decisions.

Drew Panton’s dog Jake was euthanized Thursday, Jan. 20, by order of a judge. The Perro de Presa Canario and another one of Panton’s dogs, a pitbull named buddy, were declared dangerous after they bit and seriously injured a 12-year-old Lhasa Apso on New Years Day 2015.

After hearing testimony from witnesses and dog behaviour experts, Supreme Court judge Anne Wallace ordered Buddy returned with conditions, but Jake was to be euthanized.

Panton thought the regional district’s actions were unfair as this was the first offense for either dog and he appealed Wallace’s decision. Although the decision was upheld and Jake was put down, Panton says at least he got a judge to rule on an owner’s right to a trial by judge, rather than leaving such a major decision up to the regional district.

Now Panton says the regional district had threatened to make him pay back tens of thousands of dollars in care and confinement costs if the appeal failed.

“The first tactic they use is the threat of long term confinement,” he says. “They tell you it will be a year before trial. They say even if you get conditional release you will have to pay for confinement up until trial.”

Justice Ron Skolrood says in his decision that owners must have a way to appeal a decision made by the regional district and that the district could not force Panton to pay back the $22,000 incurred by housing Jake while he awaited his fate.

Regional district spokesperson Bruce Smith sent out a release earlier this week saying they may however, seek from Panton impound costs for providing care and shelter from the date of Wallace’s order on Sept. 3 to the date of the appeal on Dec. 19.

Panton says he has not been told if this will happen, but Smith says they plan to seek at least $20 per day plus any medical expenses incurred.

Smith says he doesn't know if the threat of thousands of dollars in possible costs would deter owners from seeking an appeal.


Jake, a Perro de Presa Canario, was euthanized this week by court order.

To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw "at" infonews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones "at" infonews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

Source:  http://infotel.ca/newsitem/owner-of-euthanized-dangerous-dog-claims-regional-district-threatened-him-with-impound-fees/it27032

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Letter: Many must complain to get bylaw enforcement
Jan 21, 2016 - Kelowna Capital News

To the editor:

The Regional District of Central Okanagan chief administrative officer told me that when I make a bylaw complaint about a nuisance, and it is not a safety issue, like for instance; junk on a property, a barking dog or an at-large dog, etc., that more than one property needs to make a complaint, and that the regional district can’t do anything about these things unless more than one property complains, and that it is like that for everyone.

I am also told it may take RDCO months or years to deal with junk on property, depending on if the junk is in full view or partially hidden from view.

The RDCO CAO told me that video of an at-large dog is not evidence of a dog at-large, because video can be manipulated. He said that two properties need to make a complaint about an at-large dog, because an at-large dog is not a safety issue. He told me that an at-large dog is only a safety issue if it is attacking.

The entire conversation I had with the RDCO CAO was unbelievable.

Sharon Schnurr, Kelowna

Source: http://www.kelownacapnews.com/opinion/letters/366134631.html

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Supreme Court judge rules dangerous Peachland dog should be put down
by Alistair Waters - Kelowna Capital News - Jan 20, 2016

A death sentence handed to a Peachland dog by a B.C. provincial court judge has been upheld by the B.C. Supreme Court.

The appeal of the lower court's ruling, handed down last year, was made by the dog's owner Drew Panton, in a last-ditch effort to prevent the court-ordered euthanization of his seven-year-old perro de presa canario dog, named Jake.

In his written judgment, judge Ronald Skolrood of the B.C. Supreme Court upheld the earlier decision by the late provincial court judge Anne Wallace, who ruled Jake was a dangerous dog as defined by section 49 (10) of the B.C. Community Charter after Jake and a pitbull owned by Panton attacked a leashed, 12-year-old lhasa apso-Wheaton terrier cross named Charley on New Years Day 2015. As a result of the attack, Charley had to be put down.

In her earlier ruling, Wallace also found Jake to be a danger to other dogs and said she felt he could seriously injure or kill them if let loose. She said she felt there was no way of managing or eliminating that risk, so she ordered Jake be put down.

In the New Year's Day attack, Jake was accompanied by a pitbull named Buddy. Both dogs were off leash at the time and Panton was not present.

In the ensuing court case, the regional district asked that both the attacking dogs be put down. But Wallace ruled while Buddy was also a dangerous dog, his life should be spared and he should be returned to Panton under strict control conditions.

In his ruling, Skolrood upheld Wallace's order of strict conditions for Buddy's care to ensure public safety. They included locking doors when Buddy was inside Panton's house so the dog could not inadvertently get out, being kept in a secured area with signs when in the yard and when out in public, being leased and muzzled at all times.

The Supreme Court judge dismissed the regional district's argument that Wallace erred in not ruling Buddy should be kept, when in the yard, in the type of enclosure required by the regional district's Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw.

Skolrood’s judgment also allows the regional district to seek to recover impound costs from Panton for providing care and shelter for Jake from the date of Wallace’s original order on Sept. 3 to the date of the appeal.

Source: http://www.kelownacapnews.com/news/365986821.html

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Dangerous Dog Appeal Denied

An appeal by a Peachland dog owner to prevent a court ordered humane euthanization of his dangerous dog has been denied.

In his written judgment, the Honourable Mr. Justice Ronald Skolrood upheld an earlier decision by a provincial court judge that determined the Presa Canario named ‘Jake’ was a Dangerous Dog as defined by Section 49 (10) of the Community Charter. The late Honourable Judge Anne Wallace found that ‘Jake’ was a grave danger to other dogs and will seriously injure or kill them if loose around them and that there is no way of managing or eliminating that risk short of humane euthanization.

‘Jake’ and a Pitbull named ‘Buddy’, both owned by Drew Panton of Peachland, were at large and involved in an unprovoked attack on New Year’s Day 2015 on a leashed 12 year old Lhasa Apso/Wheaton terrier. As a result of the severe injuries it suffered in the confrontation, the dog was humanely euthanized.

‘Buddy’ was also declared to be dangerous but was returned to his owner under strict control conditions.

In his ruling, Mr. Justice Skolrood upheld the provincial court decision to impose conditions on Mr. Panton to manage ‘Buddy’ in order to ensure public safety and that Judge Wallace had discretion to make her order for an enclosure. Mr. Justice Skolrood dismissed the Regional District argument that the dangerous dog be kept, when outside the owner’s residence, in the type of enclosure as required by the provisions of the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343.

Justice Skolrood’s judgment agrees with the Regional District that under its bylaw, it may seek to recover from Panton impound costs of providing care and shelter for ‘Jake’ from the date of Judge Wallace’s order on September 3rd to the date of the appeal.

Link to Reasons for Judgement, etc:

August 4, 2015

September 3, 2015

Jan 19, 2016

(January 19, 2016)

Source: RDCO Whats New http://www.regionaldistrict.com/whats-new.aspx

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Dog's fate sealed by court
Castanet Staff - Jan 19, 2016 / 5:30 pm | Story: 156553

Andrew Panton will have one last chance to see his dog before it is euthanized later this week.

Jake, a Presa Canario, was ordered put down following a BC Supreme Court decision rendered earlier today.

Panton received the judgement via email.

Jake was ordered euthanized following the fatal attack on a 12-year-old lhasa apso/Wheaton terrier, Charlie, while the dog was being walked by its owner in Peachland on New Year's Day 2015.

Panton voluntarily surrendered Jake and his other dog, Buddy, right after the attack and has fought the regional district's claim both dogs need to be euthanized ever since.

Last year, the late Justice Anne Wallace ordered that Jake be euthanized, while Buddy, an American bulldog cross that was also involved in the attack, was determined to be less of a threat and was returned to Panton with specific conditions.

In a fight to save Jake, a dog he called one of the loves of his life, Panton went back to court in December to appeal Wallace's decision.

"The bottom line here is Jake is going to be put down in the next two days. Just making the arrangements to have a final visit with him," said an emotional Panton in an interview with Castanet.

"They will not be taking me to the vet to have him put down, which is kind of sad. I wish he could see me instead of some stranger before he goes, but that won't be the case."

Along with trying to spare Jake's life, Panton successfully fought the impound fees the Regional District of Central Okanagan was trying to impose against Buddy.

"(Dog owners) will now know that the regional district can't bully them with the threat of long-term confinement and the costs involved with that confinement," said Panton. "That's always been the regional district's first ploy when you come in to meet them when they seize your dog.

"Even if you do go to court and even if you do get the judge to release the dog back to you, you are going to have to pay all impound fees up to that date. It was the first thing they threatened me with... it's just what they do. That's their number one tactic to try and get you to sign your dog over to be put down."

Panton adds he hopes this opens people's eyes to the fact they can fight and win.

"Buddy is home, safe and happy," he said.

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/West-Kelowna/156553/Dog-s-fate-sealed-by-court

We want to euthanize RDCO, so Jake and other dogs like him can live!!!  It was unfortunate that Charlie lost his life, but to destroy another life is just not right either!!!

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Man claims victory despite losing appeal to save his dog
Infotel.ca - By Adam Proskiw - January 19, 2016

Buddy and Jake
A judge has ruled that Jake (left) be declared a dangerous dog and euthanized, while Buddy (right) must be housed under strict conditions after both attacked a much smaller dog in Peachland Jan. 1, 2015.
Image Credit: Global Okanagan (with permission)


KELOWNA – An appeal by the owner of Jake, the first-time offending dog that was sentenced to death for biting another dog late last year, was unsuccessful and it will be euthanized by the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Jake is an eight-year-old presa canario that escaped from his enclosure in Peachland on New Year’s Day 2015. He and another dog belonging to Drew Panton bit an elderly Lhasa apso named Charley, which was later put down because of his injuries.

The regional district seized both Jake and another dog named Buddy that was also involved in the altercation and sought a dangerous dog order, despite this being the first time either dog hurt another. After a hearing Aug. 4, Judge Anne Wallace ordered that Jake be euthanized but Buddy be returned to Panton.

At a Supreme Court appeal Dec. 9 Panton spoke on behalf of Jake, saying Judge Wallace made a mistake and asked that Jake be returned to him with conditions.

Today, Jan. 19, Wallace’s decision was upheld.

“I’m devastated by it but it was a real stretch,” Panton said after receiving the decision by email. “I didn’t have a lot of chance to begin with. Jake's going to go down but he’s going to save a lot of dogs by bringing this case to court.”

The regional district submitted that Provincial Court judges have no jurisdiction to make conditional orders but Justice Ron Skolrood says in his decision that owners must have a way to appeal a decision made by the regional district.

“That would effectively remove the determination whether a dog was sufficiently dangerous to warrant its destruction from the court to the animal control officer. It would deprive the dog’s owner of any meaningful hearing into what should be the essential question – whether the dog is dangerous enough to warrant its destruction,” he says in his decision.

Panton said he didn’t think a dog that has no history of aggression should be euthanized after one dog fight but Wallace, in her original decision, declared Jake a “grave threat to other dogs.”

“No person was bitten by either of these dogs,” Panton said in court. “After being kicked and hit, he did not retaliate… that should have qualified him for a conditional release.”

Two dog behaviour experts also testified that both Buddy and Jake were friendly to people but the regional district and Judge Wallace felt there was enough evidence that Jake represents a danger to the public.

The regional district also asked the judge to force Panton to pay back the $22,000 incurred by housing Jake while he awaited his fate but that was denied because those are costs incurred while discharging its obligations towards the public.

Panton considers this a small victory.

“I may have lost the battle but I won the war against the regional district,” he says. “The Supreme Court has told them they don’t care what the bylaw says they care what the judge says. Somebody had to stop the regional district from empowering themselves.”


Panton is hopeful he will get one last chance to see the dog he calls “one of the loves of his life” before he is euthanized.

“I can’t think that they’ll stick a needle in him before I can see him,” he says.

To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw "at" infonews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones "at" infonews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

Source:  http://infotel.ca/newsitem/man-claims-victory-despite-losing-appeal-to-save-his-dog/it26951

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.pdf icon January 14, 2016 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Director Stack questioning Dog Licensing fines being a money grab, was a Director Item so there is nothing in the Highlights about it

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 14, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (415 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item Director Stack questioning Dog Licensing fines being a money grab - .wma (6.33 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Chair Gail Given telling Director Charlie Hodge that the Noise Bylaw does not pertain to barking dogs, that would be the Dog Bylaw that deals with barking dogs - .wma (422 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1C Bylaw Enforcement Noise Control Electoral Areas Service Review - .wma (7.16 MB)

.pdf icon January 14, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Director Stack questioning Dog Licensing fines being a money grab, was a Director Item so there is nothing in the Agenda

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 14, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (415 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item Director Stack questioning Dog Licensing fines being a money grab - .wma (6.33 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Chair Gail Given telling Director Charlie Hodge that the Noise Bylaw does not pertain to barking dogs, that would be the Dog Bylaw that deals with barking dogs - .wma (422 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1C Bylaw Enforcement Noise Control Electoral Areas Service Review - .wma (7.16 MB)

.pdf icon January 14, 2016 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

8. DIRECTOR ITEMS (items for information)

a) Dog Control Licensing Audit
The current Dog Control Audit which began in November was raised. While the Board supports zero tolerance for not having a license and the $300 fine, the question was raised whether the current door-to-door campaign is getting people to comply with as 'little pain' as possible. Staff noted that other local governments have carried out a similar approach checking their database to ensure dog owners have licensed their animals. While the campaign has produced a lot of positive results, it also has produced negative comments from the public. Concern was raised that if the dog owner was home, and had not renewed their 2014 license in 2015, they received a zero tolerance fine, while if the dog owner wasn't home received a 'door knocker' and possibly had a second chance to renew their license.

The question was raised whether the approach can be modified? The goal is compliance. Do people still find the zero tolerance model to be 'new'? The goal of the service is for dog owners to fund the program and be funded less by the general taxpayer.

ACTION: The Administrator noted that staff will review the audit at an administrative level and bring back a report to the Board on its findings, including year-to-date financials.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 14, 2016 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (415 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item Director Stack questioning Dog Licensing fines being a money grab - .wma (6.33 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Chair Gail Given telling Director Charlie Hodge that the Noise Bylaw does not pertain to barking dogs, that would be the Dog Bylaw that deals with barking dogs - .wma (422 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 14, 2016 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1C Bylaw Enforcement Noise Control Electoral Areas Service Review - .wma (7.16 MB)

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LETTERS: Kelowna bylaw officers should trust dog owners
Kelowna Daily Courier - Thursday, January 14, 2016

To the editor:

To elected officials and bylaw officers at the City of Kelowna, I have reached my boiling point.
It infuriates me you can be so biased against dog owners, to fine them $300 for not renewing a dog licence. I have been a responsible dog owner all my life, pretty much 65 years.
My dog goes for a walk with me every day and I bring with me two doggie bags, one if my dog leaves a deposit and another if, for some reason, it does it again or I see someone else does not have a bag.
There is a large number of responsible dog owners and a few irresponsible ones, I understand that. Now, let’s talk about all these other animal lovers. Should we fine horse owners who take there horses for a ride along in our regional parks and pathways. I can’t even count the times I have stepped in or have had to avoid horse droppings. Are they required to pick up after them? Are they licensed to be in public? Why are they not required to carry a shovel and pick it up?
Then, let’s talk about those loving felines, are they required to have a licence? How many times have you been awakened because there is a cat fight below your window; or, better yet, in the summer after you just washed and waxed your vehicle just to wake up the next day to have cat paws all over your vehicle and urine on your front tire? And let’s not forget when you plant flowers in the spring just to dig up cat droppings.
Explain why it’s only one species of pet that is required to purchase a licence. It sounds like discrimination to me.

Jim Browning, Kelowna

Source: http://www.kelownadailycourier.ca/opinion/article_75bf3342-baea-11e5-bf31-4310c3b5ed7d.html

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EDITORIAL: Kelowna dog bylaws reality, not sci-fi
Kelowna Daily Courier - Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Smiling summer students went door-to-door last year reminding Hamilton, Ont., dog owners of their responsibility to purchase a dog licence. Owners had the option of buying a licence on the spot for the regular price. If they refused, their names and addresses were recorded and they received “compliance” orders in the mail.
The students were working from a list of dog owners who purchased licenses the year before, but who hadn’t yet renewed.
While you might feel uneasy having a city employee on your doorstep “reminding” you of your obligation to license your dog, the approach seems downright cuddly compared to what’s happening in the Central Okanagan.
Regional District of Central Okanagan bylaw officers will knock on your door. If your dog is still living at your home, and you haven’t renewed its licence, you are immediately fined $300.
No warning. No second chance. No opportunity to renew.
This wrong-headed approach should stop immediately.
First, it’s inconsistent. If you aren’t home, you get a notice pinned to your door or dropped into your mailbox (should you still have one). That notice requests you immediately comply. You can, for $20.
Second, it will have the opposite effect to the desired outcome. Quick-thinking dog owners might see the RDCO trucks in their driveway and not answer. If their dogs are quiet or not at home, they could lie.
Third, it’s terrifying. Insert your favourite science fiction reference here, although we suggest 1984, Logan's Run or Fahrenheit 451.
Where is this approach leading?
Will bylaw demand we stop throwing banana peels in the garbage? Will they tell us to turn down our music? Will they take such an aggressive approach to how much water we use?
“Sir, we noticed from your water meter that you flush your toilets entirely too often …”
In fact, we see evidence of in-your-face tactics spreading throughout the RDCO.
Readers to this newspaper have already complained loudly about dog control’s heavy-handed strategy and, lately, we’ve received letters about people concerning garbage collection and snow removal. One resident sent a photo of his clean sidewalks and a letter from bylaw “reminding” him of his obligation to keep them clear.
We’ve also received reports from homeowners who get letters in the mail when they don’t properly dispose of their Styrofoam.
Cameras on garbage trucks and GPS tracking devices on those garbage bins are simply creepy, and it makes us believe municipal governments want to institute their own nanny state.
While these issues might be of larger importance, the RDCO needs to improve its bedside manner in dealing with taxpayers.
By the way, where is the RDCO board in all of this? The board is made up of mayors and councillors from Kelowna, Peachland, West Kelowna and Lake Country.
They are either implicit, spineless or disengaged in RDCO policy to stand up for the people who voted them into office: you.
Not only is this overly aggressive, we’re certain it’s going to fail, especially when it comes to dog control. What we believe is going to happen is dog-owners will learn very quickly to never, ever license their dogs in the Central Okanagan.
With no record of you ever having licensed your dog, the RDCO can’t knock on your door and give you the Big Brother treatment.

Source: http://www.kelownadailycourier.ca/opinion/article_ab51e7fe-b8b8-11e5-a319-13ef35a33d8a.html

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Dogs on death row: B.C. law has teeth against dogs that attack
by Dan Fumano - The Province - January 13, 2016

There is a video that went with this story, but I couldn't find a way to attach it here.  You can copy and paste the link at the bottom and see the video there if its still available.

Pet owners, victims, lawyers differ on when animals should be put down

What happens after a dog bites a person

Geoff Urton of the BCSPCA discusses what happens after a dog bites a person or attacks another animal.

Jeff Clarke started the first day of his retirement, on New Year’s Day last year, taking his 12-year-old dog Charley for a quick morning walk near his Okanagan home.

Charley, a 12-year-old Lhasa-Wheaten Terrier cross, and his owner Clarke, wearing pyjama pants, a jacket, and a tuque, had walked only a couple hundred metres from their home on Ponderosa Drive when two larger, unfamiliar dogs approached.

Within seconds, Clarke said, remembering that morning 12 months ago, “All hell broke loose.”

First, the bigger of the two dogs ran up and bit Charley’s side, Clarke said, then the second dog attacked, “and he was just relentless. He tore Charley apart.”

“It ended up with me flopping myself over Charley, and the two dogs circling us, wanting to get at him more,” Clarke said.

“But he was just — he was done.”

Clarke took Charley to a vet, who determined he had a punctured lung, among other injuries. The decision was made to put him down.

The attacking dogs, who got loose that morning from the home of Clarke’s neighbour Drew Panton, were seized by animal control and impounded.

Both of them, a 54-kilogram presa canario named Jake and a 40-kg American bulldog-pit bull cross named Buddy, were declared dangerous.

In September, a provincial court judge in Kelowna ruled that Buddy should be released to Panton, with conditions including muzzling and training. The judge also ruled Jake should be “humanely euthanized.”

Before the euthanization deadline, Panton filed an appeal, and last month in B.C. Supreme Court at Kelowna, he pleaded to save Jake from execution.

Animal law experts say the decision on that appeal, expected in the coming months, will be one of the most significant animal control decisions in recent B.C. legal history.

Panton, a 54-year-old truck driver, said he has “huge hopes for this decision,” not only for his beloved Jake, but for its implications for other B.C. owners of dogs accused of being dangerous.

“I love my dogs as I would any member of my family,” said Panton, who said he’s spent tens of thousands of dollars so far on legal efforts, between his own money and funds raised by others. “I’m not going to let it go.”

His neighbour Clarke, 67, who attended every day of the trial, said: “I’d have liked to see both of them put down, for what I went through and what my dog went through.”

“I’m a dog lover,” Clarke said. “But it could happen again. Why take the chance?”

“The sleepless nights I’ve had,” he said. “I’d hate to see that happen again to anybody else.”

Dog attacks in the news

Dog attacks in B.C. have been in the headlines in the past month.

On Christmas Day, two loose dogs entered the Fort St. John home of Robin Elgie and Wendy Lee Baker, attacking the couple and killing their cat. Baker received treatment at a local hospital, while the RCMP said Elgie “had to be airlifted out due to the seriousness of his injuries.”

Days later, twin sisters were attacked in a Richmond park by the dog they were walking. Jessi Mather suffered multiple lacerations trying to protect her three-year-old son from the dog, and her sister Kati received more than 100 bites, a detached bicep and a broken arm.

The dog, a Rotweiler-Husky cross named Yogi, was impounded in Richmond Animal Protection Society.

An online petition calling for Yogi’s release has attracted nearly 17,000 signatures, including some apparently from Mexico, Brazil, Ireland, India and Germany.

Yogi’s owner Lucas MacNeil, the boyfriend of one of the attacked sisters, took to social media to defend his dog, who, he wrote earlier this month, is “on the edge of being put down.”

MacNeil wrote on Facebook: “I’m looking into getting a lawyer, hearing to speak with a judge.” In another post about Yogi, he wrote last week: “I’ll do anything.”

On Wednesday, City of Richmond spokesman Ted Townsend said: “We have filed an application in provincial court today for the destruction of the animal.”

Yogi will remain “in custody until a court date can be scheduled,” Townsend said.

‘A powerful thing’

Section 49 of B.C.’s Community Charter is the only piece of legislation in B.C., said lawyer Troy DeSouza, that “calls for the termination” of a healthy living creature.

“Think about that. It’s like capital punishment,” DeSouza said. “So it’s a powerful thing.”

Section 49 sets out the legal powers of local governments to deal with dangerous dogs, including seizing them, and, in cases such as Yogi’s, seeking a court order to euthanize the animal.

When dogs attack and are subsequently declared dangerous and ordered destroyed, some owners, like Panton in the Okanagan, hire lawyers and mount challenges to save their dogs from what has been called “doggie death row.”

This can lead to long, costly, and emotionally charged court challenges.

Dave Smith, the owner of a dog spared from death row in 2013 by a B.C. Supreme Court appeal, said his legal fight took two years and cost more than $50,000 to keep his dog, Diesel, alive.

Diesel’s case cost the Regional District of the Central Okanagan about $95,000 in legal costs and impound fees, said district spokesman Bruce Smith, adding: “These cases are becoming a significant cost to the regional district.”


At multi-day trials where judges hear testimony from experts, investigators, and eyewitnesses, Section 49 legal challenges often feature lawyers representing two opposing sides, not unlike criminal trials for two-legged British Columbians.

DeSouza is a partner at GovLaw, a Victoria firm specializing in government legal services, and local governments enlist his services attempting to restrict the conditions under which a dog is released, or to have the animal euthanized. DeSouza’s role in Section 49 challenges is not unlike a Crown prosecutor for dogs who have been deemed dangerous, he said, and he has worked on more than 50 such cases.

On the other side of the courtroom, animal law lawyers like Rebeka Breder defend dog owners fighting to keep their pets alive.

“I deal with anything from off-leash issues, to dog bites, to what I call dogs on death row,” said Breder, who works for Boughton Law in Vancouver and has been involved in dozens of Section 49 cases.

“There’s no denying that it is a personal passion of mine as well,” said Breder, adding she has a “soft spot” for these so-called dangerous dogs, who are well-loved by their owners but “unloved by the public.”

Breder said she and DeSouza have “very, very different perspectives on Section 49.”

Public safety an issue

The Supreme Court appeal decision challenging Jake’s destruction order, which DeSouza expects within the next month from B.C. Supreme Court in Kelowna, will be B.C.’s “most significant decision on animal control” in the last decade, he said.

DeSouza pointed to a 2006 B.C. Supreme Court ruling that gave judges greater discretion on how to enforce Section 49, he said, and potentially “puts dangerous dogs back on the streets.”

DeSouza said he hopes the court decision on Jake’s fate will provide more clarity “about what judges can and cannot do.”

Breder said she’s also eagerly awaiting the decision on Jake’s case, but “vehemently” disagrees with DeSouza’s view of how the current legislation should be applied, and disputed his statement about greater discretion putting “dangerous dogs back on the streets.”

On the contrary, she said, if judges had less discretion on Section 49, it could mean animals were needlessly euthanized, and “it would take away a judge’s discretion and rights to save a dog’s life when it should be saved.”

“Section 49 is a far cry from granting equal rights to both cities and dog owners. It is much more favourable to the city,” Breder said, “There are very few rights given to owners of alleged dangerous dogs.”

Breder said some dogs who have attacked could be released with conditions, like Panton’s dog Buddy.


DeSouza said he loves dogs, and his work “is all about public safety.”

But he is not a popular figure with some B.C. dog owners.

Panton, Jake and Buddy’s owner, said: “That guy has killed more dogs than heartworm.”

“He lives to kill dogs,” said Diesel’s owner, Smith.

Sometimes, community newspaper stories about Section 49 cases in places like Peachland attract the attention of animal lovers across the globe.

“All of a sudden, you’re bombarded with about 50 emails from Austria, saying: ‘Why are you doing this?’” DeSouza said, adding he’s even received phone calls from overseas. “That’s the nature of it.”

The public hostility can be harsh, said DeSouza, “and I have the bites on my back to prove it.”

“But I have thick skin,” he said. “I don’t take anything personally. We have to take it from the aspect of public safety, especially for children. I’m thinking about other people’s children, I’m thinking about my own children.“

“It’s one thing for adults to be bitten, as traumatic as it can be, but can you imagine the child who’s been seriously bitten? I saw this boy who’s had his cheek taken out of him in Kelowna. And I’m looking at those kids and looking at what they have to deal with, not just the physical injury, but the emotional injury, for the rest of their lives,” he said. “So we do need to keep dangerous dogs off the streets. And if we can do it with the consent of owners, that’s great. But if we can’t, then we’ll just ask a judge to do it.”

dfumano "at" theprovince.com

twitter.com/fumano

Source: http://www.theprovince.com/life/Dogs+death+teeth+against+dogs+that+attack/11650202/story.html

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Federal Government Petition to Ban Shock Collars

Remember we were promised Federal Government e-petitions, well I guess they are now up and running and anyone can make a petition.

This is a petition to ban the sale of shock collars .. which is only one of the tools that should be banned. Choke chains should be banned too. please sign this petition.

Source: https://petitions.parl.gc.ca/en/Petition/Details?Petition=e-1

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Bylaw officers get a pay increase (Spallumcheen)
by Roger Knox - Vernon Morning Star - Dec 31, 2015

Bylaw enforcement officials in Spallumcheen are getting a small raise.

Township council agreed with a staff recommendation to extend its current contract with Commissionaires BC, which provides the bylaw officials, for another year.

The deal includes a 50-cent increase per hour to a rate of $31.50 for a guaranteed minimum of six hours per week.

“We are getting a lot for our dollar in regards to the level of services the commissionaires provide,” said township deputy corporate officer Cindy Graves in a report to council.

Bylaw enforcement services provided by the Commissionaires contract include handling township complaints, general bylaw contravention matters, business licensing inspections and responding to burning contraventions.

The extension expires Dec. 31, 2016.

“Next year, I’d like to see them get a long-term extension,” said Coun. Christine Fraser. “They’ve done the work for so long, they know our community and they do a good job.”

Commissionaires began servicing the township in November 2012.

Source: http://www.vernonmorningstar.com/news/363845891.html

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Get licence or pay fine
Castanet.net - Carmen Weld - Dec 7, 2015 | Story: 153505

A Kelowna dog owner is furious after receiving a fine from the regional district.

Victor says RDCO officials came to his home and slapped him with the fine as part of their efforts to update the dog licence registry.

He feels hitting pet owners with a $300 fine this close to Christmas is "cruel and predatory."

“People are trying to get by this time of year,” said Victor. “Here I was thinking he had the licence the whole time. I forgot, otherwise I would have got it.”

He says there may be many dog owners who have simply forgotten to renew.

“No warning, no nothing, and they are just doing an audit on people to collect funds.”

However, the district says it has given lots of warnings – and if your dog is still not licensed, a fine is fair game.

“We have a zero tolerance for no dog licence,” said communications officer Bruce Smith. “We are following up on all these 2,400 or so dog owners that were licensed in 2014, but didn't renew in 2015. We are checking to see what the status of their dog is.”

Smith says the RDCO needs to determine whether the dog died and the owner didn't contact them, if the dog was given away, if the owner has moved – or if they chose not to pay for a licence.

“If we show up and they have no licence, and they have a dog, and they didn't renew, then there is a ticket for $300,” says Smith.

Smith says the regional district has put up flyers, flooded the media and told dog owners over and over they need to get their licences done – there is no sympathy for owners who have ignored it.

“We sent our renewal notices in December, early January 2015. We have signs up all over the region, we've had advertising, we've had news releases,” says Smith. “Dog owners must renew their licence every year.”

Information on dog licensing is available on the RDCO website.

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Kelowna/153505/Get-licence-or-pay-fine

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.pdf icon December 7, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 7.1 Animal Control Officer Appointments

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

SUBJECT: Animal Control Officer Appointment

Regional Board Report
Purpose: Board appointment is required to enforce and administer bylaws of the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Executive Summary:
Jordan Blaskovits and James Goddard have recently joined the Regional District in bylaw enforcement as a relief Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control Service. In order to enforce the Dog Control Bylaw there is a requirement to appoint Mr. Blaskovits and Mr. Goddard as an animal control officer for the Regional District.
Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 defines Animal Control Officer as persons designated from time to time by the Regional Board as "Animal Control Officer" to enforce the provisions of this bylaw.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Jordan Blaskovits and James Goddard be appointed as a Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control Service.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio December 7, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (162 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 7, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Inaugural Meeting - .wma (11.6 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 7, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 Animal Control Officer Appointments - .wma (164 KB)

.pdf icon December 7, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

.pdf icon December 7, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Statutory Board Meeting Minutes

7. CORPORATE SERVICES

7.1 Animal Control Officer Appointments (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

SIEBEN/OPHUS
THAT Jordan Blaskovits and James Goddard be appointed as a Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control Service.

CARRIED Unanimously

=================

Director Given was acclaimed Chair of the Regional District for 2016.

Director Ophus was acclaimed Vice Chair of the Regional District for 2016.

Director Given was acclaimed Chair of the Regional Hospital District for 2016.

Director Ophus was acclaimed Vice Chair of the Regional Hospital District for 2016.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio December 7, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (162 MB)

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.pdf icon November 23, 2015 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

July – September Program & Service Update

The Regional Board has received an update on program and service accomplishments during the third quarter of the year. These include receipt of a Small Communities Fund grant of $1.9-million for upgrades to the Killiney Beach water system; the creation of two new composting instructional videos by the Regional Waste Reduction Office; two national awards for the Economic Development Commission; a clean GST audit report and the start of preparations for the 2016 budget process. Potential deficits have been identified and staff is working to mitigate in the areas of Electoral Area Planning, Economic Development and the Dietrich/Trepanier water system. The Regional District provided staff along with other local government partners during three activations of the Emergency Operations Centre for the Joe Rich/Huckleberry fire, the Bear Creek fire and the Shelter Cove/Westside Road wildfire. After nine months, the Dog Control service has 20,700 licensed dogs (19,815 from Jan. - Sept. 2014). In Planning, Service Agreements for Fringe Area Planning have been endorsed between the Regional District and four member municipalities. In Parks Services, three draft management plans are being developed; a new Cottonwoods pedestrian bridge has been installed over Mission Creek and a community consultation survey was conducted on possible infrastructure upgrades for the Fintry Community Park – Lake Access #3.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio November 23, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (172 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files November 23, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Third Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report - .wma (5.30 MB)

.pdf icon November 23, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 8.1 Third Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report

*Note* Below is only a snippet of the subjects, please click link above for entire content. 

Inspections & Bylaw Enforcement Services

Dog Control

To September 30:
o 20,700 dog licenses have been issued in 2015 (vs. 19,815 in 2014).
o 325 Bylaw Offence Notices issued for 'No Dog License'.

Comparison Revenues from Budgeted:
o Licensing - $474,141 (budgeted $474,875).
o Dog Impounding - $47,681 (budgeted $40,000).
o Bylaw Notice Adjudication Program Fines - $55,055 (budget $50,000).

Non renewed dog licenses in 2015 - 2,678. Staff is determining how to handle this issue. ie. issue $300 fine for not licensing?
Legal expenses to the end of Sept 201S has a deficit of -$67,797. Due to the Panton (Dangerous Dog) Appeal process further legal expenses will be incurred this year. Staff is limiting expenditures wherever possible to ensure no deficit will occur.

Coordinated Media Information
Proactive and positive advertising continues for the Dog Control Service to promote Licensing and the added benefits of the My Dog Matters rewards program only available to licensed dog owners.
RDCO Animal Control participated with SPCA and RCMP in a news conference to promote awareness of dogs in hot vehicles and at the SPCA Paws for a Cause Walk in City Park.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio November 23, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (172 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files November 23, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Third Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report - .wma (5.30 MB)

.pdf icon November 23, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

8. FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

8.1 2015 - 3rd Quarter Work Plan and Budget Variance Report (All Directors Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated November 17, 2015 outlined the 3rd quarter work plan and budget variance to September 30, 2015.

The Administrator reviewed the report. Three exceptions were highlighted:
• Potential deficit in legal expenses for electoral area planning due to unforeseen legal expenses;
• Projected deficit for Economic Development Commission - due to a reduction in revenue and staff benefit payout. It was noted that when end of employment occurs funds for vacation, sick time are paid out and are not budgeted in the current budget.
• Unexpected operating expenses for maintenance at the Trepanier Bench Water system.

The question was raised how deficits covered.
o If expenses for the service are higher than revenue at the end of the year, it may require additional taxation in the next year to cover a deficit.
o As legal expenses for dog control are higher than anticipated, how will this be covered? It is anticipated the additional revenue for licensing, and reduction of expenditure will cover the deficit. The question was raised if a legal reserve for dog control should be established. Staff noted this can be reviewed at budget.
o How will a deficit in legal fees in electoral area planning be covered? Currently this will be borne by the entire Board as all partners participate in electoral area planning?

BASRAN/DEHART
THAT the 2015 3rd Quarter Work Plan and Budget Variance report be received for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio November 23, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (172 MB)

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.pdf icon November 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 5.1 Annual SPCA Update

*Note* Below is just a snippet, please click link above for entire content

2014 RDCO Dog Control Transfers
•77 dogs/puppies
•Shelter cost to care:
  –$ 21,637
  –at average care cost $281
•Current MOU: $12,000
•Deficit: $9,637

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio November 12, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (448 MB)

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.pdf icon November 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Minutes

5. Delegations

5.1 Suzanne Pugh, SPCA Manager - Annual Update of RDCO Funding Received & Service Provided

Suzanne Pugh addressed the committee providing an update on the role of the SPCA--protecting and enhancing the quality of life for domestic, farm and wild animals in BC. The Regional District's Memorandum of Understanding with the SPCA expires at the end of 2015. The Regional District provides $67,000 in annual funding - $55,000 for education and the spay/neuter program and $12,000 for adoption services for dogs. In 2014 and 2015, an additional $20,000 was
provided to the SPCA to assist in funding an education coordinator who provides education opportunities to school age children at their facility as well as in schools.

In 2015, 77 dogs were transferred from the RDCO Pound to the SPCA for adoption.
The average care cost for an animal is $281.

In 2014, SPCA cared for 1700 to 1800 animals, an 14% increase over the year. An increasing number of dogs are admitted with medical and emotional issues. There has been a 21 % increase in the feline population into the branch - 640 found as
strays.

The Kelowna Branch has 9 full-time and 3 part-time staff, 360 volunteers. The cost of spay/neuter program is $96,657. Their general education program has increased over the past couple of years.

Due to the increase in adoption services for dogs, the SPCA requests additional funding in 2016, increased to $100,000--an increase of $13,000.

SPCA has a great relationship with dog control. Dog control holds a dog for 72 hours, if the dog is not claimed and is adoptable it is transferred to SPCA. SPCA will spay/neuter, provide medical treatment if required before the dog is adopted.
Normally it costs $281 for full care of animal. The SPCA charges a fee when adopting dogs to the public.

STACK/DEHART
THAT the Governance and Services Committee receive for information the SPCA update on RDCO funding provided.

CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio November 12, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (448 MB)

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Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files November 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 5.1 Annual SPCA Update only about COW Director Wayne Carson inquiring if money granted to the SPCA in Kelowna from RDCO goes towards cats the SPCA takes in.  Unfortunately the audio reply from the SPCA did not work and you can't hear the reply, but our COW Director Wayne Carson told us the SPCA said he believes that our grant money goes towards cats too - .wma (543 KB)

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.pdf icon November 12, 2015 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

This was a Director Item, so nothing was mentioned in the Highlights about Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer Rhoda Mueller passing away.

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.pdf icon November 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon This was a Director Item, so nothing was mentioned in the Agenda about Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer Rhoda Mueller passing away.

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.pdf icon November 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

9. DIRECTOR ITEMS (information items)

• Chair Given acknowledged the loss of Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer, Rhoda Mueller. Her amazing leadership in the services she delivered to the Regional District will be missed.

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Using Dogs to Haze Urban Deer
BC Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
April 20, 2012

In communities experiencing high numbers of urban deer where there is public opposition of lethal control measures, proposals have been put forward to use trained dogs to chase the deer (haze) out of town.

Currently there is no provision that would authorize a person to use a dog to harass or haze wildlife. Consideration of permitting this activity would require further policy discussion as well as government approval for an amendment to regulation. Section 78 of the Wildlife Act prohibits the use of dogs to harass wildlife. It reads:

"A person commits an offence if the person causes or allows a dog to hunt or pursue
(a) wildlife or an endangered species or threatened species, or
(b) game, except in accordance with the regulations."
Regulations do allow the use of dogs to hunt wildlife in specific circumstances, but would not apply in cases of urban deer. Dogs can only be used in hunting deer where the dog is on a leash and under the direct control of the person, as part of a scheduled open season, by a person holding a valid hunting licence.

Hazing of ungulates using dogs has occurred in National Parks in Alberta, however all land is owned by the federal government and wild lands exist directly outside of the towns. Using dogs to haze ungulates becomes much more complicated in urban areas. Associated risks or complications with this activity can include:
- Deer becoming a traffic hazard
- Deer causing property damage
- Deer becoming injured
- Deer becoming a nuisance in adjacent farmland or nearby communities
- Requiring land owner permission to access properties

In consideration of the risks and the current Policy restrictions, this Ministry is not currently contemplating permitting the hazing of urban deer by dogs.

Source:  http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/cos/info/wildlife_human_interaction/docs/Using%20Dogs%20to%20Haze%20Urban%20Deer%20Ministry%20final.pdf

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2,400 dogs owners did not renew their dog licence

Thousands ignore licence
Castanet.net - Jennifer Zielinski - Nov 7, 2015 | Story: 151355

More than 2,000 dog licences in the Central Okanagan were not renewed this year, prompting the Regional District of Central Okanagan to remind owners of their responsibility.

A total 2,400 licences from 2014 have not been renewed. Because of this, bylaw officers are focusing on an initiative to update the dog licence registry.

"We expect the majority of owners still have their dog(s)," said communications officer Bruce Smith. "That’s not fair to the dog owners who responsibly renew their dog’s licence annually. It also impacts all taxpayers because licence fees contribute to the cost of providing dog control services in the Central Okanagan.”

A licence tag on your dog’s collar makes it easier to reunite "at large" dogs and owners, and fees contribute to operation of the pound so food, shelter and veterinary care can be provided to lost and homeless dogs.

Licensed dog owners also receive the benefits of the My Dog Matters rewards program. More than 50 local businesses have signed on to the program and provide discounts and special services to dog owners.

The goal is to ensure dog owners are responsible and licence their pets, said Smith.

"We’ve seen major improvement in licensing compliance over the past two years, but we still have a way to go. We project there are over 30,000 dogs in the Central Okanagan and, to date, 20,714 are licensed.”

This year, 25 per cent of dogs that ended up at the pound were unlicensed.

Information on dog licensing is available on the RDCO website.

Source: http://www.castanet.net/news/Kelowna/151355/Thousands-ignore-licence

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Central Okanagan Regional District to focus significant resources on licensing dogs
Kelowna Capital News - Nov 7, 2015

Approximately 2,400 dog licenses from 2014 have not been renewed this year in the Central Okanagan.

Starting late next week, Regional District Bylaw Enforcement officers will, in addition to their regular duties, focus on an initiative to update the dog license registry. Dogs in the Central Okanagan must be licensed—there is ‘zero tolerance’ for unlicensed dogs resulting in a fine of $300.

“An owner may no longer have the dog and didn’t let the Regional District know, our data records will now be updated. We expect the majority of owners still have their dog(s)," said Communications Officer Bruce Smith. "That’s not fair to the dog owners who responsibly renew their dog’s license annually. It also impacts all taxpayers because license fees contribute to the cost of providing dog control services in the Central Okanagan.”

Benefits of dog licensing include:

· A license tag on a dog’s collar or harness makes it easier for staff to reunite ‘at large’ dogs with their owners;

· Fees contribute to the operation of the Pound so that food, shelter and veterinary care can be provided to lost and homeless dogs;

· Public Safety—service to our community 24/7 including investigation of aggressive dog attacks and protection from dangerous dogs;

· Financial support of the SPCA spay & neuter program, public education initiatives including school programs, and dog adoption services;

· Address-resolve neighbor dog-related conflict;

· Capturing and assisting injured or stray dogs;

· Placement for unclaimed dogs;

· Easy online dog license renewals;

· Education about barking, at-large and dog behavior;

· A one-time, free ride home;

· And more, licensed dog owners receive the benefits of the My Dog Matters Rewards Program. More than 50 local businesses have signed on to the program and provide discounts and special services to dog owners. Visit the program website at: mydogmatters.ca.

“The goal of this initiative is to ensure dog owners are responsible and license their dogs and understand the consequence of not renewing the dog’s license," said Smith. "We’ve seen major improvement in licensing compliance over the past two years but we still have a way to go. We project there are over 30,000 dogs in the Central Okanagan – and to date, 20,714 are licensed.”

This year, approximately 25 per cent of the dogs that end up in the pound are unlicensed.

Prior to emphasizing Responsible Dog Ownership in the Central Okanagan, that figure was 75 per cent.

"That’s a remarkable turnaround," said Smith. "We thank dog owners for being responsible and embracing the need for a license.”

There is information available on dog licensing and Responsible Dog Ownership on the region’s website: regionaldistrict.com/dogs.

Licenses can be conveniently purchased or renewed online (https//ww3.regionaldistrict.com) or at the Regional District office (1450 KLO Road, Kelowna); at the Regional Dog Pound (890 Weddell Place, Kelowna); each municipal government office and at the Kelowna branch of the SPCA (3785 Casorso Road). Residents in Central Okanagan West Kelowna area may also purchase a license when staff is available at the main firehall (514 Udell Road) in Killiney Beach.

Source:  http://www.kelownacapnews.com/news/342567132.html

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.pdf icon September 28, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

Animal Control Officer Appointment

Purpose: Board appointment is required to enforce and administer bylaws of the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Executive Summary:
Jamie Leonard has recently joined the Regional District in bylaw enforcement as a full-time Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control Service. In order to enforce the Dog Control Bylaw there is a requirement to appoint Mr. Leonard as an animal control officer for the Regional District.
Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 defines Animal Control Officer as persons designated from time to time by the Regional Board as "Animal Control Officer" to enforce the provisions of this bylaw.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Jamie Leonard be appointed as a Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control Service.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio September 28, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (137 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files September 28, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment - .wma (328 KB)

.pdf icon September 28, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

6. CORPORATE SERVICES

6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

OPHUS/SIEBEN
THAT Jamie Leonard be appointed as a Regional District of Central Okanagan Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control Service.

CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio September 28, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (137 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files September 28, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment - .wma (328 KB)

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Get out of the doghouse and get online
September 17, 2015. by: Lori Welbourne

If you or someone you know finds or loses a pet, post it on Facebook as soon as possible. If you are not on the most popular social media site in North America, send the picture and details to someone who is, and ask them to post it for you. This advice is intended for everyone who cares about animals, and that includes Dog Control, SPCA and rescue groups.

When a tiny white Maltese went missing in BC on August 30th, her family immediately posted a lost ad to Facebook. It was shared by many, but could not be cross-referenced with any found ads because none were placed by the dog pound that had her for days, or the rescue group that had her the week after that.

BZ was clearly not a stray. She was a lost dog wearing a red harness dropped off by a good samaritan who’d found her. Unfortunately she wasn’t microchipped or wearing a collar with an identity tag. She also wasn’t licensed since she lives out of town. She did have a tattoo however – it was just too faded to read.

As her family frantically searched in a rural area of Kelowna where they’d been camping, BZ was safe at the dog pound. Valerie and Dwayne Bell hadn’t thought to call there though. They were too busy putting up pictures, knocking on doors and talking to everyone they saw.

Fearing she’d been taken by wildlife after days of finding nothing, the family was advised to call Dog Control just in case. Val had already spoken with the SPCA and was told they knew of no dogs matching her description. She then called Kelowna Dog Control and left a message. They didn’t call back until September 10th when they informed the Bell’s the 72 hour holding period had expired and BZ had been re-homed.

Shocked to hear this, Valerie rushed over to speak with them in person and was met with insolence by the young woman at the front. Val requested they call whoever had her pup to let them know her family was desperate to get her back. She was rudely told no, and that all adoptions were final.

“I pleaded for them to just make a call and give the adoptive owners the option,” Val said. “But she refused. She claimed our dog came to them in very rough shape, needed dental and eye surgery and had sat in her lap for two days.”

Tearfully Val explained to her that BZ was 13 years old, had arthritis, was blind in one eye and recently had surgery to remove some teeth. She’d had her beloved pet since she was a puppy and because she’d always been high strung and eccentric, she knew her old dog would be too anxious and stressed to survive in a new home.

“She had the compassion of a stick,” Val said of the employee. “I told her she didn’t have a heart and left bawling.”

Not willing to give up, the distressed owner took it up with a superior who agreed to make a call. That resulted in being told the same thing: there was nothing they could do, it was done. Val warned she’d keep fighting for BZ and took her story to the media.

After a CTV News interview aired on September 13th she received an anonymous call telling her to look on the Okanagan Small Dog and Rescue website. Sure enough BZ was on the adoption page and re-named Peanut.

When she contacted Wendy McIntyre at the rescue she was told if they hadn’t taken her, the dog probably would have been euthanized. She was also informed her blind eye had been removed at a veterinary hospital.

The rescue agreed to tell the 90-year-old adoptive owner about the situation and BZ was promptly given back.

“She won’t let me out of her site for a second,” Val said. “She’s a mess. She cries all night unless I’m right there touching her.”

All of this likely would have been avoided if Dog Control or the rescue had simply placed a lost ad on Facebook when they got her.

There’s an amazing community of animal lovers that share lost and found pictures to different Facebook pages as well as their own. With so many people working together to reunite pets with their families, the Bell’s would have been alerted if a picture of BZ had been posted to a local page.

Some Dog Controls, SPCA’s and rescues are already doing this with their own Facebook pages and websites – it’s high time for the rest to follow suit. All of them should be posting every single pet they get in, and every single pet put up for adoption.

There are well over a hundred stolen and missing dogs in the Okanagan since last year, and countless throughout the province, the country and the continent. Some have fallen victim to depraved dognappers or wild animals, and others have been re-homed or euthanized before they had a chance to be found. BZ is not the first, and she won’t be the last, but communicating on Facebook and posting every critter will minimize the possibility of cherished pets falling through the cracks. Transparency and interaction with the public is long overdue.

Lori Welbourne is a syndicated columnist. She can be contacted at LoriWelbourne.com

Source: http://blogs.theprovince.com/2015/09/17/get-out-of-the-doghouse-and-get-online/

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Happy Ending After Okanagan Dog Lost and Rehomed
Kelowna Now - September 22, 2015 - by Anita Sthankiya

There is good news for a local family whose dog went missing, was adopted out, and had undergone a traumatic surgery without its owner’s consent.

At the end of August, Valerie Bell was camping in Kelowna with family and her two dogs. One of the dogs went out of sight and left Bell distraught and on the search for her elderly dog. BZ, a 13-year-old dog, was blind in one eye with a cataract and was very timid. The search for BZ led Bell to the Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) dog pound where she found out some devastating news. Bell was told that her beloved dog had undergone surgery to remove her eye and had been adopted out.


BZ at home following the incident.


Bell did everything she could to find her family dog but was unable to get help from the RDCO regarding where the dog had gone. After an interview with KelownaNow.com was posted, Bell was contacted by an anonymous person notifying her that the dog was in the care of the Okanagan Small Dog Rescue Society.

“We contacted the Okanagan Small Dog Rescue Society and we got her back the next morning,” explained Bell. “We learned that the adoption was only halfway through so I don’t know why they (RDCO) kept telling me it was done and there was nothing we could do because it wasn’t done.”

The dog had been renamed Peanut and was placed on the society’s website as available for adoption. In the posting, the society said they did not know anything about the dog’s past and that she had been rescued by them from the RDCO dog pound.

BZ is now back at home, but it has been a very difficult few weeks for the Maltese, who had her eye removed.

“It was a rough first four of five days as she would not let me out of her sight and at night she would wake me up crying,” added Bell. “She would lay down next to me, then wake up crying. She did that for days, it was very traumatic.”

Bell adds that she took BZ to her vet, in Enderby, and they were surprised that her eye was taken out while under distress. While Bell is not happy that the dog had to go through such a series of traumatic events, she is just happy to have BZ back at home.

BZ is now adjusting to life with one eye and is on the road to recovery as she had her stitches out on Monday.

Source: https://www.kelownanow.com/watercooler/news/news/Kelowna/15/09/22/Happy_Ending_After_Okanagan_Dog_Lost_and_Rehomed/

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Judge clarifies dangerous dog ruling in Peachland case
by Alistair Waters - Kelowna Capital News - Sep 8, 2015

A B.C. provincial court judge has clarified her judgement, issued July 31, for two dangerous dogs involved in an unprovoked attack earlier this year in Peachland.

The incident resulted in a 12-year-old Lhasa Apso/Wheaton terrier being seriously injured and the owner deciding to humanely euthanize the dog.

In the original judgement, Judge Anne Wallace ruled a pitbull named Buddy and a presa canario named Jake, are "dangerous" dogs as defined by section 49 (10) of the B.C. Community Charter.

She found Jake to be a danger to other dogs and said he should be euthanized. She ruled that Buddy, while dangerous, should be returned to its owner with conditions.

At the request of the Regional District of Central Okanagan, Wallace has clarified her judgement with an order to reflect the requirements and higher standards of control for dangerous dogs as legislated in RDCO's Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343.

In order to protect the public and other animals from future potential incidents, Buddy must be leashed and muzzled when outside a dwelling or an enclosed vehicle, kept in a secure fenced area on his property, a sign must be posted advising the public that a dangerous dog is on the property and the dog must be microchipped.

Additional public safety conditions were also outlined in the order for Buddy’s owner.

The judge's order also extended the deadline for an appeal of her decisions on the fate of the two dogs until Sept. 14.

Source:  http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/325779321.html

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Owner of two ‘dangerous dogs’ speaks out
August 7, 2015 - By Angela Jung South Okanagan reporter - Global News

KELOWNA — Andrew Panton considers his two pets as family, saying he’s devastated by a provincial court judge’s decision to put one of his dogs down.

READ MORE: Judge declares two Peachland dogs dangerous, one to be euthanized

Panton defends his beloved pets, a presa canario named Jake and a pit bull named Buddy, saying he’s never had any issues in the past.

“They’ve been absolutely no problem whatsoever. I’ve had zero incidents of aggressive behaviour of these dogs,” says Panton.

But on New Year’s day, there was a problem. Both dogs escaped Panton’s home when a guest left a door opened.

The dogs eventually encountered Peachland resident Jeff Clarke and his 12-year-old dog Charley, who were out for a walk in their neighbourhood.

Jake and Buddy attacked the smaller dog and despite Clarke’s best efforts to protect his pet, Charley was left with puncture wounds to his lungs and bites to his face and neck.

Given Charley’s age and expected long recovery, he was put down.

Charley was a 12-year-old Lhasa Apso/Wheaton terrier attacked on New Year’s Day.

Clarke says the judge’s decision is providing him some closure.

“Nothing is going to bring Charley back. I don’t want to see any dogs euthanize or what have you. But I think these two dogs should be because of what I saw and what I heard in witness testimonies in court. I just disagree with the final decision,” says Clarke.

Judge Anne Wallace has ruled that Jake will be euthanized and Buddy be returned to Panton with conditions.

The Regional District of Central Okanagan has filed a requisition, stopping the pit bull’s release.

It is seeking clarifications on the judge’s conditions because some of them don’t follow or contradict its dog control bylaw.

Panton doesn’t want just one of his pets back, he wants both.

“What Jake did was wrong. I don’t know what caused him to make a bite like that. I don’t know what I’m going to do without him,” says a teary Panton.

So he’s considering going through the court system again, this time to the court of appeal.

Source: http://globalnews.ca/news/2153999/owner-of-two-dangerous-dogs-speaks-out/

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.pdf icon July 27, 2015 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

January - June Program and Service Update

The Regional Board has received an update on program and service accomplishments during the first half of the year. Among the key highlights: the successful negotiation and ratification of a new five year collective agreement with CUPE Local 338 RDCO unit; RDCO staff went on the road holding five well-attended Information Open Houses in several neighbourhoods of the two electoral areas to answer questions about programs and services; launching of the new RDCO website with improved site search capabilities and adoption of the 2015-2019 Financial Plan. In addition, the Board was told that paid-on-call firefighter recruitment is up at all four RDCO fire departments and the Crime Prevention Coordinator has helped organize new Block Watch programs for Joe Rich and several neighbourhoods in West Kelowna. At mid-year, the Dog Control service has 19,756 licensed dogs (11,409 in June 2014) with almost 3,200 new licenses issued. The convenient online licensing program has brought in increased revenue as more dog owners go online to purchase their dog license. In Parks Services, electrical service was installed for Westshore Estates Community Park and three management plans are in the early stages of development for Woodhaven Nature Conservancy, Black Mountain/Sntsk‘il’ntən and Goats Peak regional parks.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 27, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (147 MB)

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.pdf icon July 27, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.1 2015 Work Plan And Budget Variance Report

.pdf icon Item 6.1 Dog Control Statistics - Year-to-Date June 30, 2015

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

Inspections & Bylaw Enforcement Services

Dog Control
• To June 30,19,756 dog licenses have been issued in 2015 (vs. 19,815 in 2014).
o 3,196 New licenses.
o 16,560 Renewed licenses.
• Legal expenses higher than anticipated due to 3 dangerous dog court cases.
• Increased online licensing in 2015.
o To date, $173,485 vs $86,200 in 2014 for a difference of $87,285.
• 249 Bylaw Offence Notices issued for 'No Dog License'.
• Comparison Revenues from Budgeted:
o Licensing - $450,011 (budgeted $474,875).
o Dog Impounding - $31,056 (budgeted $40,000).
o Bylaw Notice Adjudication Program Fines - $38,432 (budget $50,000).

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 27, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (147 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 2015 Work Plan And Budget Variance Report - .wma (3.12 MB)

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.pdf icon July 27, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

6. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

6.1 2015 - 1st & 2nd Quarter Work Plan & Budget Variance Report (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated July 23, 2015 outlined the first and second quarter work plan and year-to-date budget variances for each service. It should be noted that revenues will be low as some other recoveries and revenues have not been recognized or received at this point in the year. The 3rd quarter report will more accurately reflect revenues.

Of note, year-to-date dog control statistics provided show an increase in dog licensing: 19,756 licenses have been issued to June 30lh (19,815 to December 2014) and, less dogs are being impounded without a license. Two court cases, for three dangerous dogs, in the 2nd quarter have increased legal fees, It is anticipated increased revenue and decrease in other expenses will offset the increased legal fees.  Business licenses and building permits are higher than expected.

SIEBEN/GRAY
THAT the 2015 - 1st & 2nd Quarter Work Plan & Budget Variance Report be received for information;
AND FURTHER THAT the Dog Control Statistics, year-to-date June 30, 2015 be received for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 27, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (147 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 2015 Work Plan And Budget Variance Report - .wma (3.12 MB)

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.pdf icon July 16, 2015 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment

The Regional Board has appointed Cara Barnsley as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer. She is the Dog Control Service Bylaw Enforcement Coordinator.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 16, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (95.5 MB)

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.pdf icon July 16, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.2 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

Purpose: Board appointment is required to enforce and administer bylaws of the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Executive Summary:
Cara Barnsley has recently joined the Regional District as the BYLAW ENFORCEMENT COORDINATOR for the Dog Control Service. There is a requirement to have this position appointed as a bylaw enforcement officer to manage bylaw enforcement issues.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Cara Barnsley be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 16, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (95.5 MB)

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.pdf icon July 16, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

6.2 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

BASRAN/BAKER
THAT Cara Barnsley be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 16, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (95.5 MB)

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.pdf icon July 16, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 9.2 2015 2019 Financial Plan Amending Bylaw No 1365 2015

*Note* Below is only a snippet, please click links above for entire content

Item 9.2 2015 2019 Financial Plan Amending Bylaw No 1365 2015

SUBJECT: Budget Bylaw Amendment

Purpose:
To amend the Regional District of Central Okanagan 2015 - 2019 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1356, 2015 via amending bylaw 1365.

Executive Summary:
Amendments to the 5 year Financial Plan have been proposed as follows:
199 - Vehicle Operations: To increase the capital amount from $7,500 to $13,000 for software that best meets the RDCO's needs, funded from reserves.
111 - Electoral Area Planning: To reflect a $10,000 OBWB grant received and related costs of $10,000 for the Joe Rich Creek Restoration Monitoring Program.
123 - Joe Rich Community Hall: Unforseen legal expenses of $4,000 relating to contract administration have been incurred which were not budgeted. To offset these costs, the planned $4,000 transfer to reserves has been removed to avoid a deficit.
142 - Regional Parks: Included $3.4 million for land acquisition strategy in 2016.
046 - Dog Control: Reduced HVAC/Air Conditioning capital project from $25,375 to $7,000, and increased Pound Improvement Project from $0 to $18,375 for security, cameras, and other needs.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT the Regional District of Central Okanagan 2015 - 2019 Financial Plan Amending Bylaw 1365, 2015 be given 1st, 2nd, 3rd reading and adopted.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 16, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (95.5 MB)

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.pdf icon July 16, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

SUBJECT: Budget Bylaw Amendment

Purpose:
To amend the Regional District of Central Okanagan 2015 - 2019 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1356, 2015 via amending bylaw 1365.

Executive Summary:
Amendments to the 5 year Financial Plan have been proposed as follows:
199 - Vehicle Operations: To increase the capital amount from $7,500 to $13,000 for software that best meets the RDCO's needs, funded from reserves.
111 - Electoral Area Planning: To reflect a $10,000 OBWB grant received and related costs of $10,000 for the Joe Rich Creek Restoration Monitoring Program.
123 - Joe Rich Community Hall: Unforseen legal expenses of $4,000 relating to contract administration have been incurred which were not budgeted. To offset these costs, the planned $4,000 transfer to reserves has been removed to avoid a deficit.
142 - Regional Parks: Included $3.4 million for land acquisition strategy in 2016.
046 - Dog Control: Reduced HVAC/Air Conditioning capital project from $25,375 to $7,000, and increased Pound Improvement Project from $0 to $18,375 for security, cameras, and other needs.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT the Regional District of Central Okanagan 2015 - 2019 Financial Plan Amending Bylaw 1365, 2015 be given 1st, 2nd, 3rd reading and adopted.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 16, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (95.5 MB)

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We asked the Auditor General for Local Government to investigate RDCO Dog Control, and this is the response we got below on July 8, 2015:

The issue of dog control is outside the mandate of our office.

The Auditor General for Local Governments website states the following:

Our focus is on furthering the economy, efficiency and effectiveness of local government operations by conducting performance audits and related work, such as studies. In all this work, we will be fair and objective.

Then we sent an email to MLA Christy Clark the same day asking if the Auditor General for Local Government can change their mandate.  Don't know if we will receive a response but if we do, we will post an update here.

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Park wildlife harassed by off-leash dogs
Kelowna.com - March 26th, 2010

City staff recently came to the aid of a traumatized young deer in Knox Mountain Park – the latest in a growing number of encounters between off-leash dogs, wildlife and park users.

“Knox Mountain Park is a wildlife area and the temptation to chase wildlife is too great for off-leash dogs,” said Mark Tompkins, Kelowna’s Parks and Community Relations Coordinator. “Dogs will be dogs. When they’re not under control by their owner, they will run after other animals and after people who might not appreciate it.”

The yearling attended to March 9 by Park Services staff and members of the provincial Conservation Officer Service was injured and disoriented when it was spotted at the base of the mountain near the tennis courts.

Conservation officers had received a call a few hours earlier about a black Labrador Retriever attacking a small deer along the Paul’s Tomb Trail in the park. The dazed yearling attended to later by the conservation officers had indications of dog bites. It was tranquilized and removed by the conservation officers and was later released back into the forest once it recovered.

The owners of pets that come into conflict with a wild animal are liable for a $345 fine.

“Our calls to Knox Mountain Park are definitely up more than normal, most likely as a result of the great spring weather,” said Regional District of the Central Okanagan dog control officer Jeff White. “On our daily patrols of that park, I’d say about 70 per cent of dogs are leashed in the visible parts of the park. But once you get into the forested area or in the park around the tennis courts, that’s where the off-leash calls come in.”

RDCO’s dog control officers patrol Knox Mountain Park at least once daily, said White, and make walking tours of the Paul’s Tomb trail.

Source: kelowna.com/2010/03/26/park-wildlife-harassed-by-off-leash-dogs/

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2014 BYLAW ENFORCEMENT STATISTICS (from RDCO 2014 Annual Report)

Dogs Licensed 19,815
Dog Complaints & Responses 2,366
Dog Patrols - Non Compliance 659
Dog Bylaw Violation Tickets 823
Total Dogs Impounded 669
Unlicensed Dogs Impounded 256
Dogs Reunited with Owners 540
Dogs to SPCA for Adoption 86
Dogs Euthanized (Bylaw Initiated) 4

found on page 9

source: regionaldistrict.com/media/138339/2014AR.pdf

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Dog fines out of control
Castanet.net - by Contributed | Story: 140852 - May 27, 2015

Last year I got my two small lap dogs licensed around the end of February/2014 for the first time. I have not received or heard anything from the RDCO/Dog Control office since. Then recently, one of my neighbours complained about our dogs barking in the back yard when left unaccompanied at home outside. This is something we were not aware of and most certainly would have corrected had the neighbour simply left an anonymous note on our porch. But they felt compelled to report it to dog control so an officer sent who left a notice at my door. After playing phone tag with the officer, we finally connected and he informed me of the complaint and said it was just a warning but then broke it on us that our "permanent dog licenses" had expired and I am facing a $600 fine (reduced to $300 if renewal done within a week) and my renewal rate has doubled from the usual $20 to $40 per dog.

I did not receive any renewal notices or reminders or anything from RDCO office. As this is my first year renewing, I was not familiar with the process so I was waiting to hear from RDCO but nothing until this incident.

My dogs both proudly wear their "permanent dog tag licenses" on their collars so for, all intents and purposes, I considered them licensed. Had I received any notices or bills, I would have surely paid them. But because of this missed payment of $40 I am now facing a potential $640 increase.
I have now paid the $80 fee ($40 regular plus $40 penalty and asked to have the $600 in fines waived. I have now been informed of the "Zero Tolerance Policy" they apparently adopted and my request refused.

What really irks me is that I have never met a dog control officer face to face, no dog control officer has ever actually seen my dogs, nor have I received any tickets. Just phone calls and emails. For all I know, there was no complaint; they simply noticed I hadn't renewed my license, came knocking on the door, heard dogs bark so wrote tickets (which I have yet to receive). I look forward to the opportunity to dispute my tickets and hopefully face the alleged complainants to see if they truly exist.

In short, watch out Central Okanagan dog owners, dog control is rabid and on the loose!

Andrew Giffin

Blue Divider Line

Pet unfriendly By-laws
Castanet.net - by Contributed | Story: 140298 - May 20, 2015

Dear Mayor and Council Re; Pet Unfriendly By-laws and Harsh Enforcement.

As long time citizens and duly licensed pet owners, we appeal to you for restoration of fairness and reason in the enforcement of Kelowna and District pet owner By-laws. Pet ownership in this community now faces being taxed out of existence or restricted to only the rich.

During a daily morning exercise outing with our two pet dogs, the younger puppy escaped before I could secure its leash. Unfortunately, this is a puppy that enjoys ‘chase’ and ‘keep-away’, with little regard to ‘fetch’ or ‘come’ commands. The bottom line is that I contacted the local Dog Pound for help in capturing my escaped puppy and instead received the label of a ‘guilty offender’; a delinquent dog owner with a sentence of two fines totalling $300.00. When I dared to question the controlling enforcement authority about the reasonableness and fairness of enforcement policy, my further sentence was a harsh lecture about the ‘kindness of the Authorities’ in not levying further fines of $150.00 plus, for disruption of Creekside wild life.

As a pet owner, I have been hearing for some time about ‘pet unfriendly Kelowna’, particularly in relation to park and street access and regulatory attitude. Earlier this month I witnessed this fact first hand. Until that time, I was unaware as to the real and serious nature of the problem. And from all appearances, the problem is becoming worse. By-law enforcement officers are now addressed as ”constables” and sent out to greet the public in Kevlar vests and belts built for the ready addition of side arms and other police ‘apprehension items’. Somehow the civic philosophy of “serve and protect” basic to public service and regulations has been warped in the bureaucratic chain of command: Regulations now have the appearance of ‘an excuse to penalize and tax to the max.’ Surely this is not the intent of you as our community leaders and policy makers.

If our faith in you is correct, then we are sure that you will want to reign in those bureaucrats who would abuse their powers. As our elected representatives, we appeal to you to correct this matter. You have the power and the authority to restore reason and justice in the application of local laws. As a concerned pet owning citizen, we urge you to do so.

Respectfully,
Ian R. Sisett and Marguerite B. Sisett

Blue Divider Line

Mary Jane Drouin who was spokesperson for RDCO in this video at the link below, and who is also RDCO's top Dog Control Manager said quote, "If a dog would do that to its owner, what would it do to somebody else that it doesn't know.

We have been bit by our own dogs and we learned why.  There was no reason to euthanize our dogs, we just had to understand why the dog bit, then deal with it, which we did.  Its too bad that judge didn't decide like Diesels second judge who ruled that Diesel could go live with someone else and that Diesel wasn't really a dangerous dog, Diesels owner was the problem.

Our Toy Poodle was biting us, and we figured out why, he was scared of hands over his head.  Maybe he got hurt, we don't know.  When we were cuddling together and our Toy Poodle was feeling comfortable we would pet our Toy Poodles head, even though he didn't like it much at first, and that cured him of being scared of hands being over his head.  He learned to trust that hands over his head wasn't going to hurt him.  Dogs usually bit out of fear and its up to us to figure out what that fear is and fix the problem, not euthanize a perfectly good dog cause you can't figure out the problem.  Some people would take a dog back to the SPCA because it pee's in the house.  That is not how you train your dog!!!

Anyway, if Mary Jane Drouin thinks that every dog that bites its owner should be put down, she needs some education about dogs!!!!  How about we educate her!!!

RDCO attended about this dog several times and let it get as bad in our opinion!  A lot of it is RDCO's fault obviously, just as much as it is the owners!!!

RDCO could have ordered training for the dog, or surrender the dog if RDCO so choose to do through a conditional order.

A dog doesn't leash itself, and there is such a thing as a bad owner.  We think a zero tolerance policy for at large dogs and off leash dogs were they are suppose to be leashed, would make a huge difference.  RDCO has a zero tolerance policy for dog licencing, so don't know why they can't change their policy on at large and off leash dogs!!!

Dangerous Kelowna dog ordered to be euthanized
Globalnews.ca - April 8, 2015 - By Blaine Gaffney - Reporter Global News

KELOWNA – “Loki will have to be euthanized. There is no other option.” That was a judge’s ruling Wednesday after a three day trial as she ordered the destruction of a dangerous dog.

Loki, a 16-month-old male pitbull, had a long history of running loose and being aggressive when it attacked one of its owners inside their Kelowna home in November.

Jennifer Heitzmann was bitten multiple times on her arms and legs and spent two days in hospital before discharging herself against doctor advice.

The judge called the dog mauling savage and persistent. “The wounds are deep, bloody, and gruesome. In the attack Loki broke a bone in Ms. Heitzmann’s hand,” said Provincial Court judge Jane Cartwright.

Heitzmann, and her partner Rick Bellar, say she was injured when Loki came to Bellar’s defence as he was being attacked by two men and Heitzmann was trying to pull the dog back.

The judge rejected that explanation, saying the evidence shows the dog attack happened as the couple were having a loud argument.

“Ms. Heitzmann’s wounds were not consistent with the version that her injuries were caused by holding onto Loki. Those actions might result in one, accidental, bite. But Loki bit her, with a great deal of force, over and over, on all her extremities,” said Cartwright.

An expert in the behaviour of aggressive dogs testified rehabilitating Loki would require thousands of dollars in home modifications and extensive training.

“It would be irresponsible in the extreme to release Loki to anyone, much less the respondents, as they have proven that they are unable to control Loki,” declared the judge.

She banned Bellar and Heitzmann from owning or residing with any dog that has been declared aggressive or dangerous by an animal control officer for three years.

The pitbull will be put down after 30 days if its owners don’t appeal the destruction order. Bellar says he intends to do that.

The court case cost the Regional District of Central Okanagan about $7500.

Link to court judgement - April 8, 2015

Blue Divider Line

.pdf icon March 27, 2015 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

There are no Highlights published on RDCO's website for Budget meetings for some unknown reason.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 27, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (13.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1 Financial Plan Presentation - .wma (41.6 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1 2015 Budget And Five Year Plan Report Revisedmar27 - .wma (8.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1A Budget Piechart And Information Revisedmar27 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1B Tax Requisitions And Rates Revisedmar27 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1C Financial Plan Departmental Table Of Contents - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1D Community Services Engineering Pg 1 34 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1E Community Services Waste Management Pg 35 42 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1F Community Services Planning Pg 43 46 Revised Mar27 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1G Community Services Fire Protection Pg 47 65 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1H Community Services Police Services Pg 66 73 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1I Community Services Inspections Pg 74 77 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1J Parks Services Pg 78 90 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1K Finance And Administration Pg 91 127 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1L Corporate Services Pg 128 147 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1M Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement Pg 148 159 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1N Economic Development Commission Pg 160 161 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1O Regional Board Pg 162 171 - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.3 2015 2019 Financial Plan Bylaw No 1356 Revisedmar27 - .wma ( MB)

**** All the budget audio is in the first two links .. it was too much work to figure out each of the items.

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.4 Temporary Borrowing Bylaw No 1357 - .wma (481 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Addition of Late Item - Item 5.1 MFLNRO Referral 3411445 Westbank First Nation - .wma (296 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 MFLNRO Referral 3411445 Westbank First Nation - .wma (4.04 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about comments from the public in regards to the budget - .wma (11.9 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Reardon explaining about how Regional District budgets work - .wma (507 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about CAO Reardon mentioning there are issues with rural dog control and rural policing - .wma (293 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Fire Dept Review Costs - .wma (2.81 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Given attending CAO meeting in Victoria - .wma (457 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Ophus attending municipal finance meeting - .wma (818 KB)

.pdf icon March 27, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 4.1 Financial Plan Presentation
.pdf icon Item 4.1 2015 Budget And Five Year Plan Report Revisedmar27
.pdf icon Item 4.1A Budget Piechart And Information Revisedmar27
.pdf icon Item 4.1B Tax Requisitions And Rates Revisedmar27
.pdf icon Item 4.1C Financial Plan Departmental Table Of Contents
.pdf icon Item 4.1D Community Services Engineering Pg 1 34
.pdf icon Item 4.1E Community Services Waste Management Pg 35 42
.pdf icon Item 4.1F Community Services Planning Pg 43 46 Revised Mar27
.pdf icon Item 4.1G Community Services Fire Protection Pg 47 65
.pdf icon Item 4.1H Community Services Police Services Pg 66 73
.pdf icon Item 4.1I Community Services Inspections Pg 74 77
.pdf icon Item 4.1J Parks Services Pg 78 90
.pdf icon Item 4.1K Finance And Administration Pg 91 127
.pdf icon Item 4.1L Corporate Services Pg 128 147
.pdf icon Item 4.1M Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement Pg 148 159
.pdf icon Item 4.1N Economic Development Commission Pg 160 161
.pdf icon Item 4.1O Regional Board Pg 162 171
.pdf icon Item 4.3 2015 2019 Financial Plan Bylaw No 1356 Revisedmar27
.pdf icon Item 4.4 Temporary Borrowing Bylaw No 1357
.pdf icon Item 5.1 MFLNRO Referral 3411445 Westbank First Nation

 

Final 2015 RDCO Dog Control Budget


click each page for a larger copy

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 27, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (13.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1 Financial Plan Presentation - .wma (41.6 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1 2015 Budget And Five Year Plan Report Revisedmar27 - .wma (8.3 MB)

.pdf icon March 27, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

Minutes of the Board meetings are not usually posted to RDCO's website until after the following meeting which would be April 27th, 2015 because the April 9th meeting has been cancelled.  If the minutes are not posted here yet, you can check RDCO's website to see if they are posted there yet.  If you want a copy of the minutes before then, contact RDCO who will have a copy of the minutes at their office within 7 days after you request a copy of the minutes.  This is in accordance to Local Government Act Procedure Bylaws and Enforcement section 794 (5) and Community Charter Other records to which public access must be provided section 97 (2).

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 27, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (13.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1 Financial Plan Presentation - .wma (41.6 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 27, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 4.1 2015 Budget And Five Year Plan Report Revisedmar27 - .wma (8.3 MB)

Blue Divider Line

.pdf icon March 23, 2015 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

There is nothing mentioned in the Highlights about Director Item - Hansen wanting to get rid of pitbulls, because this was a Director Item.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 23, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (19.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 23, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item - Hansen wanting to get rid of pitbulls - .wma (367 KB)

.pdf icon March 23, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon There is nothing mentioned in the Agenda about Director Item - Hansen wanting to get rid of pitbulls, because this was a Director Item.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 23, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (19.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 23, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item - Hansen wanting to get rid of pitbulls - .wma (367 KB)

.pdf icon March 23, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

Minutes of the Board meetings are not usually posted to RDCO's website until after the following meeting which would be March 27th, 2015.  The April 9th meeting has been cancelled.  If the minutes are not posted here yet, you can check RDCO's website to see if they are posted there yet.  If you want a copy of the minutes before then, contact RDCO who will have a copy of the minutes at their office within 7 days after you request a copy of the minutes.  This is in accordance to Local Government Act Procedure Bylaws and Enforcement section 794 (5) and Community Charter Other records to which public access must be provided section 97 (2).

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 23, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (19.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 23, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Item - Hansen wanting to get rid of pitbulls - .wma (367 KB)

Blue Divider Line

.pdf icon March 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 5.1 Okanagan Collaborative Conservation Program Biodiversity Conservation Strategy Update
.pdf icon Item 5.2 Woodhaven Eco Cultural Centre Annual Report
.pdf icon Item 6.1 Okanagan Regional Library Population Numbers For Electoral Area Levy
.pdf icon Item 6.2 Technical Rescue Service Proposal District Of West Kelowna
.pdf icon Item 6.3 Draft 2015 Budget And 2015 2019 Financial Plan
.pdf icon Item 6.3A Budget Piechart And Budgets Summary
.pdf icon Item 6.3B Tax Requisitions And Rates
.pdf icon Item 6.3C Community Services Engineering
.pdf icon Item 6.3D Community Services Waste Management
.pdf icon Item 6.3E Community Services Planning
.pdf icon Item 6.3F Community Services Fire Protection
.pdf icon Item 6.3G Community Services Policing Services
.pdf icon Item 6.3H Community Services Inspections
.pdf icon Item 6.3I Parks Services
.pdf icon Item 6.3J Finance And Administration
.pdf icon Item 6.3K Corporate Services Administration
.pdf icon Item 6.3L Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement
.pdf icon Item 6.3M Economic Development Commission
.pdf icon Item 6.3N Regional Board

.pdf icon Item 6.4 Quarterly Program Measures Report (no longer missing from RDCO's website)

*Note* Below is just a snippet, please click links above for entire content

Item 6.4 Quarterly Program Measures Report

Bylaw Services
In 2014, 739 Bylaw Offence Notices were issued under the new Southern Interior Bylaw Adjudication program. 68 were disputed, 13 went to adjudication resulting in 10 successful, and 3 withdrawn; 22 disputes withdrawn by disputants, 17 withdrawn by issuing Officer, and 1 Compliance Agreement. 13 remain to be screened.

In 2013, 159 Bylaw Offence Notices were issued.

046 - Dog Control (Page 164): Surplus of $285,613 attributable to higher than anticipated Licensing, Impounding and Bylaw Notice Adjudication revenues and under expenditures for advertising, postage, Dog Control Service review, salaries and legal fees.

Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 was adopted February 24, 2014.

Effective January 2014, there is zero tolerance for any dog found without a license. Bylaw changes were adopted increasing the fine for an unlicensed dog from $100 to $300 effective January 1, 2014.

Agent Collection fees were higher than anticipated due to fewer than expected new licenses and renewals being processed online or at the Administrative office. Extensive work was performed to the website to improve the dog licensing application and renewal process to be more user friendly. The feedback from the new web design has been positive and an increase in online transactions has been observed.

Total dog licensing revenues increased from $348,679 in 2013 to $464,911 in 2014. There were 20,163 dog licenses issued in 2014, a 20% increase over 2013, when 16,847 dogs were licensed.

Additionally, there were 707 dogs impounded during 2014, up from 632 in 2013 and interrupting a ten year downward trend. The number of dogs euthanized is also decreasing annually: from a high of 306 in 2003 to 44 in 2014 which includes 23 that were initiated by individual dog owners.

Two summer students were hired to carry out the new Ambassador program introduced in spring 2014.

A Dangerous Dog Application moved to the Provincial Court for disposition in December. It is anticipated that legal and costs associated with long-term care of the dog at the pound will increase in 2015.

Quarterly reporting Dog Control measures have been streamlined for 2014 to bring the information in line with monthly reports as presented to the Board. Dog Licenses sold are now available by jurisdiction.

Finance & Administration Services: The Senior Accounting Coordinator/Systems Analyst worked closely with Dog Control to completely renovate their dog licensing online interface.

==============

Item 6.4 Quarterly Program Measures Report

Finance & Administration Services:
The number of website payments has significantly increased with the additional option to pay for composters and permanent dog license renewals online. In 2014, 8,960 online payments were made totaling $487,443 compared to 2013 with 5,061 payments totaling $490,164 and 2012 with 3,163 payments totaling $352,587.

==============

Item 6.4 Quarterly Program Measures Report

Board
Media Interest was very high In the first quarter due to the introduction and passing of the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw. Additionally, there was supportive advertising and media coverage as dog owners were encouraged to renew licenses for 2014 and purchase a new license as the bylaw Increased the fine to $300 for dogs caught without a license. Benefits of the My Dog Matters program were promoted and ongoing updates were provided for the MyDogMatters.ca program website.
Approximately 77% of visitors to the mydogmatters.ca website each month are new, which directly results from the number of new dogs being licensed and owners receiving program cards. Advertising was completed in high traffic pedestrian corridors and waterfront parks to raise awareness of the Dog Ambassador summer program.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 12, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (37.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 5.1 Okanagan Collaborative Conservation Program Biodiversity Conservation Strategy Update - .wma (7.11 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 5.2 Woodhaven Eco Cultural Centre Annual Report - .wma (9.97 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.1 Okanagan Regional Library Population Numbers For Electoral Area Levy - .wma (16.7 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.2 Technical Rescue Service Proposal District Of West Kelowna - .wma (8.52 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3 Draft 2015 Budget And 2015 2019 Financial Plan - .wma (17.4 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3A Budget Piechart And Budgets Summary - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3B Tax Requisitions And Rates - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3C Community Services Engineering - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3D Community Services Waste Management - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3E Community Services Planning - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3F Community Services Fire Protection - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3G Community Services Policing Services - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3H Community Services Inspections - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3I Parks Services - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3J Finance And Administration - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3K Corporate Services Administration - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3L Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3M Economic Development Commission - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.3N Regional Board - .wma ( MB)

It is too hard to find each section of the missing links above so not going to break down the audio into sections for this meeting.  All the audio of this meeting are in the links above and below.

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.4 Quarterly Program Measures Report being added to the agenda - .wma (279 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files March 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.4 Quarterly Program Measures Report - .wma (208 KB)

.pdf icon March 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Minutes

*Note* Below is just a snippet, please click link above for entire content

6.4 Quarterly Measures Report - Year-Ended December 31, 2014

Staff report dated March 6, 2015 reported on the summary of 2014 activities for each individual service as set out in the 2014-2018 Financial Plan. The highlights for the year are not inclusive-there are too many items to be covered for each
service. Multi-year comparative statistics by service/program are available in the full report.

OPHUS/HANSON
THAT the Year End December 31,2014 Quarterly Program Measures report be received for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio March 12, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (37.3 MB)

Blue Divider Line

13 on-leash parks added
Castanet.net - by Wayne Moore | Story: 135874 - Mar 24, 2015

Dog owners in Kelowna will soon have more areas in which to walk their pooch.

Plus, a second water park could be added to the inventory.

Parks manager Ian Wilson announced the changes Monday as part of an overhaul of the city's parks bylaws.

The new on-leash areas include:

Bella Vista Park
Bellevue Creek Greenway
Crawford multi-use court property
DeHart Park
Eagle View Trail
Gallagher Community Park
Gopher Creek Park (additional properties added)
Mountainside Park
Ponds Community Park
Stockley Open Space
Surtees property
Kelowna Memorial Park Cemetery
Wilson was asked specifically about the addition of the cemetery property.

"The cemetery is one of our important walking paths in the city and a lot of people do walk and bike through there," said Wilson in response.

"We have noticed there are people in the neighbourhood who do like to walk their dog on the roadway. We thought we may as well legalize that to ensure that it is respectful and, so far, it's been quite good."

Wilson said 76 per cent of the city's park area now allows dogs on-leash.

Coun. Charlie Hodge, long a proponent of dog parks and specifically water parks, asked about the possibility of adding more water parks.

"How many dog parks do we have that are water parks, aside from our famous nude beach?' asked Hodge.

Wilson said Cedar Creek Park on Lakeshore Road remains the main water park, but indicated more could be on the way.

"It's a complex issue, but we do have a couple of promising leads," said Wilson.

"The government campground ... this year there is a project on the books to demolish one of the old houses there, and that may be a potential site off Poplar Point. But, we do want to do some neighbourhood engagement before we go there."

Blue Divider Line

Using electronic cigs?
by Castanet Staff | Story: 135873 - Mar 23, 2015

The City of Kelowna has taken aim at E-cigarettes, drones and geocaching during its latest round of amendments to the Parks and Open Spaces bylaw.

Parks manager Ian Wilson presented those changes to council Monday afternoon.

At the top of the list was a change to the smoking bylaw to include electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) to the list of banned smoking materials and to expand the public spaces definition to include areas around a public transit exchange bus shelter or bus stop.

The issue of e-cigarettes was raised by Interior Health in a letter to the city.

The letter asked the city to include the product as part of its current cigarette ban.

"Concerns about the safety and efficiency of e-cigarettes have prompted Health Canada, the World Health Organization and the US Food and Drug Administration to warn consumers against using them," said Dr. Trevor Cornell in the letter to the city.

Among other things, Cornell said the product may contain toxic substances, there are no product safety standards, no evidence base that they are an effective quit smoking aid and may trigger cravings in youth who are trying to quit smoking.

"We commend the City of Kelowna for taking swift action to adopt e-cigarette prohibition in the existing bylaw," said Cornell.

Wilson added the city's regional transit department received several complaints about smoking around bus shelters prompting the addition of those areas as public spaces allowing the bylaw to include those areas.

Ironically, Councillor Charlie Hodge who suffers from emphysema came to the aid of smokers suggesting there be a proper smoking area with downtown City Park.

"I am the last person in the world, especially with my health condition, to be promoting smoking but I think there are those that come to our city from out of country who should not be made to feel like criminals because they want a cigarette," said Hodge.

"There should be a designated area somewhere in the park that is big enough and I hope staff look at putting one in for the summer."

Hodge said he would bring that item up a later date to be debated by the council as a whole.

The city amended several other portions of the bylaw, including:

New definitions around geocaching as well as specific rules for geocaching in parks to prevent environmental damage, reduce risks to geocache enthusiasts and to help prevent confusion or concerns.
A prohibition on flying an unmanned aircraft or drones in a park without a permit
The addition of 13 properties where it is now permissible to walk a dog on-leash.
The addition of Priest Creek Linear Park as a designated equestrian park

Wilson said banning non-permitted drones from flying over city parks addresses both a privacy and safety concern.

He also said a second water dog park is being contemplated in the city.

At present the only park where dogs are permitted to go in the lake is the nude beach at the end of Lakeshore.

"It's a complex issue but we do have a couple of promising leads," said Wilson.

"The government campground...this year there is a project on the books to demolish one of the old houses there and that may be a potential site off Poplar Point. But, we do want to do some neighbourhood engagement before we go there."


All of the changes will come into effect once council gives fourth and final reading within the next few weeks.

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DID YOU KNOW:  That if you have trouble with the Regional District of Central Okanagan, that you can call the Ministry of Community Sport and Cultural Development office Ariel Gutta 250-387-4024 (for Central Okanagan West) who can advise you of what you and your Director may be able to do to solve your problem?  Yes the public is permitted to get advice from this department.

If you don't live in Central Okanagan West you can call Enquiry BC at 1-800-663-7867 and ask to be put through to the Ministry of Community Sport and Cultural Development office at 250-387-2283, to find out who your local advisor is for your area.

Just call Enquiry BC at 1-800-663-7867 and ask to be put through to the Government of BC number you want, so you don't have to pay any long distance charges.

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LACK OF CONTROL OVER GOVERNMENT

RDCO is spending 1 1/2 million on dog control in this new budget, but there is no dog control whatsoever in my subdivision. In fact I have been listening to excessive and overnight barking for 6 years now. RDCO told me that my behaviour has to change before I get any dog control, because I got mad about the lack of dog control. The same people walk their dog off leash daily. There is shit piled high along the road. There are at large dogs coming into my yard. I think its time to remove government and I am not joking. Life would be a lot better if we had some control over our government instead of government having control over us raping us of our money and getting nothing for it but grief. I think it is time we had people working for us instead of against us. I feel that we have to work 100 times harder than government to get anything done. It shouldn't take forever to try and get some friggen dog control. Friday March 27, 2015 at 9am is RDCO's budget meeting where you are allowed to talk just before they pass the budget that they have already decided on. They don't hold a budget meeting on a day people have off work. They make sure they hold a budget meeting so that people won't have time to have a say. I suggest you speak up about the lack of dog control and the extraordinary cost associated with it, and the way RDCO is treating some people like me. RDCO is the biggest bully around telling me that my behaviour needs to change before I get any dog control. I am paying for dog control, but not getting anything for my money. In my opinion we don't need a government, we need people who work for us, not against us.

Westsider

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Have you ever been bullied?

Yes: 867
No: 246

Total votes 1113

Source: Castanet.net Poll February 25, 2015

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Pets off-leash
Castanet.net - by Contributed | Story: 134243 - Mar 3, 2015

For the past 4 weekends, my family and I have gone been hiking thru Kalamalka Lake Provincial park enjoying the spring like weather. During our hikes more than 90% of the pets we encountered were off-leash, both on trails and on the people only section of Corsen’s bay beach. Our 4 year old daughter is very afraid of dogs, since she's been attacked twice. This has proved to be very distressing to my daughter as the pets that are off-leash running up to her and has reduced the enjoy ability of our outings, with us having to pick her up or shield her from these dogs.

It is clearly stated on the BC Parks website, that pets are to be on-leach at all times except for the 2 designated areas.

I feel that there is not enough signage to remind pet owners that their pets are required to be on-leash at all times in the park and can only be off-leash at the 2 designated pet-friendly beach areas.

I would like to remind pet owners that they are responsible for knowing and abiding the rules when they have their pets with them, keep them on-leash, clean up after them. Because when they decide to be the animals that they are and they injure someone because of your negligence, there will be financial and emotional repercussions.

Jon Jones

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Letter: Bullying continues into adult life
Kelowna Capital News - Mar 3, 2015

Wednesday, Feb 24, 2015 was Pink Shirt, Stop Bullying Day. On this day I encouraged people to not only wear a pink shirt, but to be brave and stand up to any and all bullies in their midst. I know from experience that bullies don't stop bullying until confronted.

Bullying doesn't just happen in school either. I am over 50 years old and am still being bullied to this day by my neighbours and my Regional District.

I have been subjected to hours of barking for the past five years, despite having a dog bylaw against barking for more than five minutes. None of my neighbours will complain about the barking and I am told that I need another neighbour to complain.

I keep reporting and nothing is done. How anyone can stand to listen to 5 1/2 hours of two dogs howling and barking is beyond me. The other two dogs are at large chasing and barking at wildlife most nights. Nobody seems to care about the dogs or the wildlife they chase.

Because I keep complaining and getting upset about nothing being done, I am told by my Regional District that my behaviour has to change, before I get any dog control.

Bullying is rampant in my life.

Sharon Schnurr, Kelowna

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.pdf icon February 25, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Agenda Presentation
.pdf icon Item 3.1 Summary Highlights Report
.pdf icon Item 3.1A Budget Piechart And Information
.pdf icon Item 3.1B Budgets Summary
.pdf icon Item 3.1C Tax Requisitions And Rates
.pdf icon Item 3.1D Community Services Engineering
.pdf icon Item 3.1E Community Services Waste Management
.pdf icon Item 3.1F Community Services Planning
.pdf icon Item 3.1G Community Services Fire Protection
.pdf icon Item 3.1H Community Services Police Services
.pdf icon Item 3.1I Community Services Inspections
.pdf icon Item 3.1J Parks Services
.pdf icon Item 3.1K Finance And Administration
.pdf icon Item 3.1L Corporate Services
.pdf icon Item 3.1M Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement
.pdf icon Item 3.1N Economic Development Commission
.pdf icon Item 3.1O Regional Board
.pdf icon Item 3.2 Proposed Regional Parks Capital Facilities Reserve Allocation 2015-2019

*Note* This is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

Central Okanagan West Tax Requisition Comparison 2015 to 2014

2015 RDCO Tax Requisition - Total per average house

RDCO 2015 Preliminary Budget Pie Chart

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 25, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (33.9 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1 Summary Highlights Report - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1A Budget Piechart And Information - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1B Budgets Summary - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1C Tax Requisitions And Rates - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1D Community Services Engineering - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1E Community Services Waste Management - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1F Community Services Planning - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1G Community Services Fire Protection - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1H Community Services Police Services - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1I Community Services Inspections - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1J Parks Services - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1K Finance And Administration - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1L Corporate Services - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1M Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1N Economic Development Commission - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.1O Regional Board - .wma ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 25, 2015 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3.2 Proposed Regional Parks Capital Facilities Reserve Allocation 2015 2019 - .wma ( MB)

.pdf icon February 25, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Minutes

Corporate Services

046 - Dog Control - Proposed budget includes $200k in operating reserves and a requisition decrease of $93.6K.
105 - Noise Bylaw Enforcement - reinstating tax requisition

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 25, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (33.9 MB)

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Off-leash dogs could face wildlife fines
February 16, 2015 - Daily Courier Staff

Owners who don’t leash their dogs in Knox Mountain Park could be fined under the Wildlife Act.

City of Kelowna’s Park Services was recently made aware of an off-leash dog chasing deer in the park.

“Knox Mountain Park, while heavily used by residents, is a wildlife area and the temptation to chase wild animals can be too great for an off-leash dog,” said said Blair Stewart, the city’s urban forestry supervisor. “There are a seemingly growing number of dog and wildlife incidents reported every year, and they often unfortunately result in an injured wild animal.”

Knox Mountain Park is patrolled by the regional district’s dog control officers at least once daily, including a foot patrol of the Paul’s Tomb Trail. However, if necessary, residents can contact dog control at 250-469-6284 or bylaw enforcement at 250-469-8686 to report infractions.

An owner of a pet that comes into conflict with a wild animal is liable for a $345 fine under the Wildlife Act.
Kelowna has nine off-leash dog parks: Cedar Creek Park, 5200 Lakeshore Rd.; Duggan Park, 1494 Bernard Ave. (small dogs only); Ellison Centennial Park, Old Vernon Road at the Ellison Firehall; Enterprise Way Dog Park, behind the Shaw Cable building; Knox Mountain Park’s fenced dog run; Mission Recreation Park at Lexington Road; North Glenmore Dog Park, across from the landfill; Rowcliffe Park (Central Green Park), 575-599 Harvey Ave.; and Rutland Recreation Park, Hartman Road.

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.pdf icon February 12, 2015 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Nothing was mentioned in the Highlights about Item 6.1 2014 4Th Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 12, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 2014 4Th Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report - .wma ( MB)

.pdf icon February 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.1 2014 4Th Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report

*Note* Below are only snippets, please click links above for entire content

Inspections & Bylaw Enforcement Services

Dog Control

To date, 19,815 dog licenses have been Issued in 2014 (vs. 16,845 In 2013)
o 5,182 New licenses
o 14,633 Renewed licenses

497 Bylaw Offence Notices Issued for 'No Dog License'
o 158 tickets have been paid In full or have entered payment plans

Increased Revenues from Budgeted:
o Licensing - $84,875
o Dog Impounding - $43,220
o Bylaw Notice Adjudication Program Fines - $39,177

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 12, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 2014 4Th Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report - .wma ( MB)

.pdf icon February 12, 2015 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

Minutes of the Board meetings are not usually posted to RDCO's website until after the following meeting which would be February 25th, 2014.  If the minutes are not posted here yet, you can check RDCO's website to see if they are posted there yet.  If you want a copy of the minutes before then, contact RDCO who will have a copy of the minutes at their office within 7 days after you request a copy of the minutes.  This is in accordance to Local Government Act Procedure Bylaws and Enforcement section 794 (5) and Community Charter Other records to which public access must be provided section 97 (2)

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 12, 2015 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 ( MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 12, 2015 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 2014 4Th Quarter Work Plan And Budget Variance Report - .wma ( MB)

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Fear of dogs forces family move
Castanet.net by Carmen Weld | Story: 132403 - Feb 7, 2015

Following a story out of Peachland of a fatal dog attack that left two other dogs on death row, another dog owner has come forward claiming inequality and inconsistency with the Regional District's decisions.

Kimberly Leedam says two of her dogs were viciously attacked and killed in her Rose Valley neighbourhood by two other dogs, but unlike the Peachland situation, the attacking dogs were released back to the owner and she doesn't understand why.

She says they had lived beside the neighbour and his dogs for two-years without issue, but on that day something changed. The attack occurred on April 17, 2014 when she says her neighbour's off-leash dogs charged at them from their unfenced yard.

“The dogs came, they came flying through the hedge and there was nothing we could do,” says Leedam who claims her two small breed dogs, Juno and Chico, were “ripped apart” by the two Rhodesian Ridgebacks.

“We had to wrap them in towels, they were just bleeding everywhere. We took them to the vets and as I took one inside I could hear my daughter screaming. His lungs were filling with blood and she could hear it,” says Leedam through tears. “We put him down right away and we tried to save her through surgery, but she died during the surgery.”

Leedam says the Regional District of Central Okanagan's decision to return the dogs to the owner in this case and only give them a dangerous dog designation, left her family in fear in their own neighbourhood and forced them to move in December.

“I was vehemently against the return of these dogs as we lived in the family neighbourhood of Rose Valley, exactly four properties down from the new Mar Jok Elementary,” says Leedam. “Something snapped that day with the dogs, something is wrong with them. So why would the RDCO, with the exact same situation, do two different things. It baffles me.”

RDCO spokesman Bruce Smith says despite the similar circumstances on the surface, the two situations were much different and each case is dealt with on its own facts.

“There is no black and white, there is a lot of grey in between, and that is what we find in an investigation, the grey,” says Smith. “On the surface it may appear we are dealing with the same thing, but it is not. It is two different cases and the investigation came out with two different sets of circumstances that were unique to each, that resulted in a determination of how the regional district proceeded.”

While Smith will not go into specifics of why this case was different, but he says a thorough investigation was done and the circumstances were quite different.

“We investigate thoroughly and based on the facts we determine in the investigation determines on how we proceed,” says Smith. “The one thing I've seen in the last 13 years with the Regional District is that each case is very different.”

Leedam also claims the district never even came to their neighbourhood or to the owner's home but Smith says the owner is not aware of the full details of their investigation.

"I do not understand the inequality and inconsistency with the RDCO’s decisions on cases of vicious unprovoked dog attacks that resulted in the death of a family pet or in our case family pets," says Leedam.

“It is a case by case basis. Past history might come into it, previous civil court decisions comes into it and of course the investigation itself,” adds Smith.

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Seen this on RDCO's facebook page

RDCO Bark Log thrown out.

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Dog attack case in Peachland going to court
AM1150 - Feb 3, 2015 - by Adam Graham

A trial date will likely be set soon to decide how to handle two dogs that attacked and killed a smaller dog that was on its leash in Peachland on New Years Day.

Regional District of the Central Okanagan Spokesperson Bruce Smith says a Pitbull-American Bulldog cross and a Presa Canario were not on leashes and were not provoked when they attacked the Lhasa Apso-Wheaten Terrier cross. Smith says Regional District officials will argue in court that the dogs are dangerous and should be put down.

"We're asking for an order to humanely euthanize the dogs, but it's up to the court to decide on a proper disposition, whether that would be returning the dogs to the owner, returning the dogs with conditions or adopting the dogs out," says Smith.

The attacking dogs have been held at the pound since the attack.

Smith says he'd prefer it if they didn't have to go to court because the process can be extremely time consuming and tax payers have to pay the Regional District's legal fees.

"We hoped the owner (of the attacking dogs) would do the responsible thing, but that's not the case and now we have to go to court," says Smith, who adds that most owners of dogs who are found to be responsible for vicious attacks agree to have their dogs euthanized.

The issue will go before a judge on February 16th to set a trial date.

DON'T KNOW WHY EITHER DOG NEEDS TO BE PUT DOWN?

CAN'T RDCO STOP WASTING TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND COME UP WITH A CONDITIONAL ORDER?

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My Dog Matters Reward Program
Castanet.net - by Contributed | Story: 96217 - Aug 7, 2013

I received `My Dog Matters` Reward Program Card for licensing my dogs and I was shocked and discouraged.

I do appreciate the RDCO attempting to improve compliance in a friendly way…. but I just think this shows how little they have actually listened to the people of Kelowna.

As one of the founding Members of Kelowna Dog Association we have been actively trying to improve the life of dogs in Kelowna for years. We have talked with hundreds of Dog Owners about compliance with licensing and why they do or don't license their dogs.

The Dog Owners of Kelowna have been very vocal about why they don't licence their dogs and why they feel Kelowna has such a reputation of being very `Dog Unfriendly`.

Dog Owners of Kelowna have filled out surveys, attended protests, signed Petitions and written countless letters to City Council, Parks Services and various media.

Dog Owners of Kelowna want increased maintenance in Off-Leash Dog Parks, increased access for Dogs On-Leash in all neighbourhood parks….and more than anything else, a Dog Beach closer to the City.

We have also heard requests for trails where Owners can run with their dogs off leash, more `small` dog areas, more doggy dispensers along city streets and water taps and benches in Off Leash Parks.

We have also heard many people express strong opinions and lack of trust in the RDCO regarding the impounding of dogs and how the cases that have been in the media recently were handled.

We have never heard anyone suggest they would consider licensing their dog if there was an award program for small discounts at local businesses.

I understand that the RDCO may have followed another City as an example where this program has been successful, but I think they should listen to the people in our own City.

Our Dogs do matter to the people of Kelowna.

Thank you
Carla Irvine

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This is the way the Regional District of Central Okanagan knows how to fix the barking problem that has been going on at Valley of the Sun for years.  These envelopes were found in the mailbox on Nov 24, 2014.

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Jan 12, 2015 RDCO Dog Control armed with video, will do nothing with the video but patrol again!!!  Can you afford all the joyriding??

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Not ‘furniture’ any more: Animals in France get status upgrade after 200 yrs
rt.com - November 05, 2014

“Living beings capable of sensitivity” – that’s the new status French domestic animals have received, after being regarded as “furniture” in the Civil Code for over two centuries.

Until now, cats and dogs, along with other pets and farm animals, had the same status in the code as an armchair.

However, a two-year fight by the French animal rights organization Fondation 30 Million d’Amis (Foundation of 30 Million Friends) led to change.

“When it was drawn up in 1804, the Civil Code was the reflection of a society where animals didn’t benefit from the same attention as we afford them today,” Reha Hutin, head of the group, as quoted as saying by The Telegraph.

Two hundred years ago, she added, the animals were viewed as “an agricultural force” in “an essentially rural France,” she said.

AFP Photo/Mark LargeAFP Photo/Mark Large

Jean Glavany, who compiled the legislation to change animals’ status, stressed it was an important “symbolic” step.

Currently, the law on the cruel treatment of animals comprises the punishment of a maximum two-year prison term and 30,000-euro fine.

“This will change mentalities, notably among judges and prosecutors so that punishments are truly applied,” François Legueulle of 30 Million d’Amis said.

The new step might also change the course of actions for divorced couples if there is a dispute about who ends up with the animal.

“The family judge will be able to take into account the spouses’ financial situation, their treatment of the animal, its relationship with the children to decide whether it should end up with Monsieur or Madame. They could even go as far as affording visiting rights, shared care or alimony for subsistence,” Legueulle said.

The initiative by Fondation 30 Million d’Amis was received coldly by farmers’ organizations, who have expressed concern that if animals receive a status between “goods” and “humans,” it could put livestock farming in danger.

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Kelowna dog must be muzzled or enclosed following attack on child
GlobalNews.ca - By Blaine Gaffney - Dec 4, 2014

KELOWNA – A dangerous dog in Kelowna must be muzzled and on a leash whenever its outside the owner’s home or kept in an enclosed area when on the property.

Frank Wruth and Brandie Lasalle agreed to the restrictions which were approved by dog control authorities and endorsed by a judge this week.

The dog, a mastiff, was seized in October and held in the pound after an unprovoked attack on a playing field at South Rutland Elementary school.

A Regional District of Central Okanagan spokesperson says the dog owners were playing soccer with family and friends when a 10 year old child fell. The unleashed mastiff bit the youngster’s face causing a severe injury.

If the restrictions of the Consent Order are breached, the dog can be seized and euthanized.

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New Dog Laws Take Effect Today In Mississauga| Should The Government Tell You How To Treat Your Pet?
Toronto, ON, Canada / Talk Radio AM640 - Chris Bundas - December 01, 2014

A new bylaw takes effect in Mississauga today to try and minimize people who neglect their pets.

The law bans dog owners from leaving any animal outside in extreme weather without adequate shelter.

The shelter has to be a “double-walled and insulated doghouse that is large enough for the pet to stand up, turn around, lie down and stretch its limbs in”

The law also states that dogs may only be tied up for a maximum of four hours in a 24-hour period.

Any dog left tethered must be in sight of others and able to access food, water, shelter and shade.

While driving with pets your dog must remain in the passenger compartment of the vehicle and not be left unattended in the car if weather conditions are unsuitable.

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Kelowna pet friendly??
Castanet.net - Story: 127623 - Nov 25, 2014

Dear Editor,

You must be joking!!!

Kelowna being voted the most pet friendly city in Canada just goes to show what you can weasel your way into anything if you have the right connections.

As a dog owner all my adult life, and having lived in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and California I can say without hesitation Kelowna is the most dog phobic community I have ever encountered.

While veterinary care and dog day care options may be superb, simply owning a dog is travail. Most parks do not allow them, period. Those that do "allow" dogs have signs posted warning you to keep them on the pavement, not allowed on the grass, folks, even in summer when pavement temperatures reach paw-scorching levels

Most people have to drive their dogs to the nearest off-leash dog park, how environmentally friendly! There is only one lake-accessible dog park on this side of the bridge, and one on the West Side - both require vehicles to access from Kelowna proper.

The limits on what you can do with your dog are formidable - maximum six foot leashes, I know of exactly one dog friendly restaurant, dog control can come onto your property at any time without warning or warrant, and heaven help you.

If a complaint is filed against your animal (excessive barking, for example), you are guilty until proven innocent. Just one (anonymous) neighbour's complaint can land you in trouble, never mind what all your other neighbours say.

I don't know who voted Kelowna pet friendly, but they definitely need to take off the rose coloured glasses.

Trish Boileau

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Animal charter of rights drafted with policymakers in mind
uOttawa law professor says it's more of a conversation starter
CBC News - Nov 24, 2014 -

A Canadian animal rights group is promoting its “Charter of Rights and Freedoms for Animals” as a way to further their protection, but its practicality is being questioned by other legal experts

Animal Justice's non-profit wing launched their charter campaign last week, saying it would “ensure animals are treated as sentient beings instead of mere property, would guarantee the rights and freedoms that make life worth living, and give all animals a chance to have their interests represented in court.”

The group says there’s a gap between how Canadians care about animal welfare and how the legal system views it, and are hoping a petition draws the attention of policymakers.

“Animals don't have legal standing to go to court and have a judge say yeah, that animal's rights are being violated, that to me that is very sad,” said Camille Labchuk, a lawyer with Animal Justice.


Camille Labchuk

Animal Justice lawyer Camille Labchuk says their charter would give 'clear guidelines' on how animals are to be treated. (Camille Labchuk)

“(A charter would) give clear guidelines on how animals are to be treated and how we expect to live with them... free from suffering, live meaningful lives which they can express natural behaviours and socialize.”

Labchuk said though many animals raised for slaughter are treated inhumanely, they aren’t asking for people to stop eating meat.

She wouldn’t say what the charter could mean for zoos and aquariums.

Law prof: idea would cause 'huge problems' with way society structured

 


Carissima Mathen uOttawa Animal Charter

University of Ottawa law professor Carissima Mathen says protecting animal rights just like human rights would be 'almost a legal revolution'. (Laurie Fagan/CBC)

University of Ottawa law professor Carissima Mathen said there has been a shift toward more accommodation for some animals, but enshrining animal rights into law similar to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms would be provocative and “almost a legal revolution.”

“One of the core rights of any person is the right not to be exploited and we use animals in a variety of ways,” she said.

“That's really not for the benefit of animals, it's for the benefits of humans. There would be huge problems with that.”

Mathen said the idea does serve a purpose as a conversation starter, which does benefit Animal Justice.

However, she said it wouldn’t become law without the political will to back it up.


=======================

Poll question


Yes, the justice system is letting animals down. 49.57% (807 votes)


No, this would be a big disruption to human lives. 17.87% (291 votes)


I think we need another way to better protect animal rights. 32.56% (530 votes)

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HOLY CRAP

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EXAMPLE OF RDCO DOING NOTHING ABOUT BARKING DOGS

RDCO received two complaints from two different property owners about the same barking dogs, and still won't do anything about a barking dog that has had several prior complaints for barking, according to this dog incident report dated September 10, 2014.  The one person complaining owns property here, but does not live here full-time but does come to stay in the building on the property for weeks at a time in the summer months.  If you only visit here as a property owner, and pay property taxes, you don't get any dog control.  Please read the parts underlined in red.  It says "File received and file as information only."  RDCO did nothing... didn't even talk to the dog owner.   And did you know that RDCO has that right.  RDCO does not have to enforce any bylaw if it doesn't want to, enforcing any bylaw is up to RDCO's discretion according to the BC Ombudsman.

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This dog control officer (Alan Duncan) has to go!!!
After all, it is left up to the dog control officers how they handle complaints, RDCO has told us several times.  Read the second paragraph of this letter we received from RDCO Dog Control about dog control officers having sole discretion in how they handle complaints.


click the letter to read it.

 

An aggressive dog story about the same dogs.

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If you photograph an at large dog, and submit it to RDCO, RDCO will do patrols not only where the loose dog was reported but also in other subdivisions, despite submitting photos and telling RDCO where the dog lives.  So why doesn't RDCO go visit the dog owner instead of patrolling for nothing?  RDCO had photo's!!


October 17, 2014 we received the above report in our mailbox
click for a larger copy

 

Nov 21, 2014 we received an amended Dog Incident Report of the above report, which was amended on Oct 6, 2014.
Our feelings tend to make us believe that RDCO didn't want us to see the Oct 6, 2014 entry, since we received the original report on October 17, 2014 which was 11 days later after the last entry.  We believe the dog owner lied about not owning any dogs.  They have at least two dogs and possibly three dogs.  This dog incident report is for complaints filed on August 7th for June 25, 2014 and August 7th, 2014, and another complaint filed Sept 12, 2014 with photos of the at large dogs.


click for a larger copy

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.pdf icon October 27, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.3 3rd Quarter Workplan And Budget Variance Report

*Note* This is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content.

Inspections & Bylaw Enforcement Services

Dog Control

To date, 19,024 dog licenses have been issued in 2014
o 4,549 New licenses
o 14,475 Renewed licenses

430 Bylaw Offence Notices Issued for 'No Dog License'
o 120 tickets have been paid in full or have entered payment plans

Revenues Exceeding Budget Amounts ($90K YTD):
o Licensing - $34,647
o Dog Impounding - $29,401
o Bylaw Notice Adjudication Program Fines - $25,647

Dog Ambassadors Program
Successful media promotion results in expansion of My Dog Matters business participation

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 27, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (11.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.3 3rd Quarter Workplan And Budget Variance Report - .wma (13.6 MB)

.pdf icon October 27, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

6.3 3rd Quarter Work Plan and Budget Variance Report (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated October 21, 2014 outlined the 3rd quarter work plan/budget variances to September 30,2014. The Board had previously requested a higher level quarterly measures report. The detailed year-end report with statistics will be presented in the New Year as part of the 2015 budget process.

Staff reviewed the report presented. A year-to-date budget variance chart was provided for each service. Any 'red-flag' areas of concern were highlighted. It was noted that variances in revenue and expenses are due to 2014 expenses
yet to be paid or revenue not yet received.

BAKER/EDGSON
THAT the Regional Board receive the 3rd Quarter Work Plan and Budget Variance Report for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 27, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (11.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.3 3rd Quarter Workplan And Budget Variance Report - .wma (13.6 MB)

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Barking dogs
Castanet.net - by Contributed | Story: 124369 - Oct 7, 2014

Dear dog owners

I love dogs just as much as you, but letting your pets out in the early mornings to do their constitutions and leaving them out to bark their heads off is rude!

Last week someone on our street let their darling out at 5:30 a.m. and let the dog whimper and whine and bark for the next hour and a half. Can't you hear your pet?

Let your pet out to pee and whatever, but can you PLEASE take them back in so the rest of your neighbours can sleep? There is a noise bylaw for animals which is in effect 24/7.

Linda Wadsworth

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Don't know if this is for weeds or dogs or both because it does not say.

.pdf icon October 9, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Bylaw Officer Appointment

The Regional Board has appointed Kim Mussenden as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer within the Regional District.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 9, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (8.38 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 9, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (123 KB)

.pdf icon October 9, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 5.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment

*Note* This is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

Regional Board Report

FROM: Mary Jane Drouin - Manager - Corporate Services
DATE: October 2,2014

SUBJECT: Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment

Purpose: Board appointment is required to enforce and administer bylaws of the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Executive Summary:
The Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer is currently on leave, and there is a need to have a bylaw enforcement officer appointed to manage bylaw enforcement issues, if and when required, within the electoral areas. Kim Mussenden has the experience to fulfil this role as required.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Kim Mussenden be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Found this below on Google

Kim Mussenden was Administrative Assistant as well as Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the Weed and Insect Bylaws, now she is managing bylaw enforcement issues and taking Rhoda Muellers job while she is away.  Wonder if this includes dogs, because it does not stipulate if it does include dogs or not.  Rhoda Mueller was manager of dogs too.  Do we have two managers of Dog Control?  We would hope not. See September 11, 2014 RDCO Board Meeting

========================

May 28, 2012 RDCO Board Agenda

Bill Spill and Kim Mussenden began full time seasonal employment with the RDCO Weed and Insect bylaw program on May 4, 2012. Bill Spill has worked as a relief employee for RDCO since 2009 and Kim Mussenden has worked as a relief employee for RDCO since 2011.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 9, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (8.38 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 9, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (123 KB)

.pdf icon October 9, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

5. CORPORATE SERVICES

5.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

OPHUS/FIELDING
THAT Kim Mussenden be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio October 9, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (8.38 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files October 9, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (123 KB)

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More officials may be authorized to break into hot cars to rescue animals
Globalnews.ca - By Amy Judd - September 27, 2014

Petition started calling for criminal charges in the case of the Brookswood 6.
The six dogs, known as the 'Brookswood 6' died in a hot car in Langley in May.
Stephanie Marner
VANCOUVER – The number of officials allowed to break into hot cars to rescue animals may be going up.

The Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) wants bylaw officers added to the list, which already includes SPCA constables and RCMP.

The motion was prompted by the case in Langley where six dogs overheated and died in the back of a converted pickup truck.

It includes language giving local government the power to go into vehicles, aircraft or vessels to seize animals in critical distress.

The motion passed unanimously at the UBCM conference.

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.pdf icon September 11, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.1 Quarterly Program Measures Report

*Note* This is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

Bylaw Services

046 - Dog Control
Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 was adopted February 24, 2014. Effective January 2014, there is zero tolerance for any dog found without a license. Bylaw changes were adopted increasing the fine for an unlicensed dog from $100 to $300 effective January 1, 2014. Agent Collection fees are higher than anticipated due to fewer than expected new licenses and renewals being processed online or at the Administrative office. Software program design being reviewed to make it more user friendly. To June 30,2014, $107,600 in license fees or 21% of all licenses were processed online (3,886 out of 18,169).Changes to the dog license vendor program now limit vendors to the member municipalities, RDCO, Dog Pound and SPCA, resulting in a more streamlined financial record.

Total dog licensing revenues increased from $268,189 at June 30, 2013 to $394,658 at June 30, 2014. There were 18,169 dogs licensed at June 30, 2014, a 37% increase over June 30, 2013, when 11,481 dogs were licensed. In April a two week advertising campaign commenced to once again encourage dog license purchases. The program ran in the Capital News, Lake Country Calendar, Westside Weekly, Peachland View and on Castanet. Two summer students were hired to carry out the new Ambassador program introduced in spring 2014.

To June 30, 2014, of the 362 Bylaw Offence Notices issued under the new Southern Interior Bylaw Adjudication program, 52 were disputed and six were heard at adjudication. Quarterly reporting Dog Control measures have been streamlined for 2014 to bring the information in line with monthly reports as presented to the Board. Dog Licenses sold are now available by jurisdiction.

==============

Finance &Administration Services:

003 - Finance
Finance completed the 2014 budget in a timely fashion and the 2014-2018 Financial Plan was adopted March 28, 2014. The 2013 audits for Regional District, Hospital District, and contracted Sterile Insect Release Program & Okanagan Basin Water Board were completed and all received clean
Management Letters from the auditors BOO Canada LLP.
The Regional District has entered into a ten year Community Works Fund Agreement with the Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM), which administers the Federal Gas Tax funding program with the Canada and BC governments. Under the new agreement, the RD is eligible for bi-annual payments of $320,835 for 2014 and 2015.
The number of website payments has continued to significantly increase with implementation of the Online Dog License website renewals. To June 30, 2014, 5,846 online payments were made totaling $296,347 compared to June 30, 2013 with 2,442 payments totaling $223,270. Effective June 2014, Septic billing payments are no longer accepted online.
Senior Accounting Coordinator/Systems Analyst implemented training for the newly launched Vadim Explorer in addition to streamlining the online payment processes for Dog Control, Alarm Control and Business Licenses. New for 2014, journal vouchers entered into the General Ledger have documentation scanned and attached to the voucher for electronic referencing.

================

Board

001S - Board Sub-Program Corporate Communications
Media interest was very high in the first quarter due to the heightened activity and public response to the introduction and passing of the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw. Additionally, there was supportive advertising and media coverage as dog owners were encouraged to renew licenses for 2014 and purchase a new license as the bylaw increased the fine to $300 for dogs caught without a license. Advertising regarding dog licensing and explaining the benefits for licensed dog owners through the My Dog Matters program continued through the second quarter. The program website is seeing a
consistent level of visits each month as owners check out the special services and discounts available to My Dog Matters cardholders. Approximately 77% of visitors to the mydogmatters.ca website each month are new, which directly results from the number of new dogs being licensed and owners receiving program cards. Second quarter further raised awareness of expectations for Responsible Dog Ownership and attracted media exposure through the unveiling of humorous signs focusing attention on dog owners picking up after their pets.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio September 11, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (11.1 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files September 11, 2014 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.1 Quarterly Program Measures Report - .wma (3.44 MB)

.pdf icon September 11, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Minutes

6. Quarterly Program Measures Report, Year-To-Date June 30, 2014

Staff report dated September 4,2014 outlined the program measures to June 30, 2014. A summary of the highlights was presented. It was noted that staff continue to review the quarterly information presented to ensure the Committee is well
informed on the regional services and issues arising.

CONDON/EDGSON
THAT the Quarterly Program Measures Report, year-to-date June 30, 2014 be received for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio September 11, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting - .mp3 (11.1 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files September 11, 2014 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 6.1 Quarterly Program Measures Report - .wma (3.44 MB)

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.pdf icon September 11, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment

*Note* This is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content

SUBJECT: Animal Control Officer Appointment

Purpose: Board appointment is required to enforce and administer the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw of the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Executive Summary:
The Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer is currently on leave, and there is a need to have our Bylaw Enforcement Coordinator, who has previously been appointed by the Board as a RDCO bylaw enforcement officer, to be also appointed as an Animal Control Officer to manage bylaw enforcement issues for the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw, if and when required. Under her current Bylaw Enforcement Officer appointment Diane Merenick is only able to assist in carrying out the provisions of the bylaw.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Diane Merenick be appointed as an Animal Control Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio September 11, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (10.1 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files September 11, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment - .wma (182 KB)

.pdf icon September 11, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

6. CORPORATE SERVICES

6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

BAKER/FINDLATER
THAT Diane Merenick be appointed as an Animal Control Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio September 11, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (10.1 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files September 11, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 6.1 Animal Control Officer Appointment - .wma (182 KB)

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.pdf icon July 28, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Nothing was mentioned in the Highlights about Item 8.1 Dog Control Service Update.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 28, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (31.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 28, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Dog Control Service Update - .wma (3.91 MB)

AUDIO EXPLAINED BELOW, but still click the audio link above to hear the entire content because what is written below is not all of it.

Findlater states the letter about West Kelowna changing the zoning bylaw to permit 3 dogs fell through the cracks and sometime in the coming months the zoning bylaw in West Kelowna will be amended. Findlater said that part of the reason for the review of the dog control function was to have the dog owners support their dogs more and that somewhere around 2/3 - 3/4 of the dog control budget was supported by taxpayers and 1/3 - 1/4 supported by dog owners. Hobson says that increased enforcement and other things, have sucked up some of the increase in revenue, and that a financial report will be coming in the review after one year of full operation of the new Feb 2014 dog bylaw.

Stack says that 269 tickets were issued for no dog licence, and when the dog owner purchases the dog licence within 7 days, the fine will be retracted, does this require the dog bylaw to be amended. Mary Jane Drouin said this does not require the bylaw to be amended because this is an administrative policy. Stack asked if a review will be sometime after the new dog bylaw has been in place for 1 full year? Yes. Gray asks how RDCO advertises that there is a zero tolerance for no dog licence. Mary Jane Drouin says that RDCO puts ads in the newspapers and Castanet.net, bill boards, and on the licence renewal. Gray suggests a universal poster be put up in pet stores, dog parks, etc. Mary Jane Drouin says the people who are being fined are mostly new people moving here who didn't have a dog licencing program in their community, don't know they need a dog licence.  And that the onus is on the people who move here to check what the bylaws are, and that next year during the review it would be an idea to change the dog bylaw to say new residents have 60 days to purchase a dog licence instead of the current 30 days.

Approx. 2,500 dog owners have not renewed their 2013 dog licences. Mary Jane said RDCO is phoning people to find out why, maybe their dog died or husband thought wife bought the licence and vise versa.

.pdf icon July 28, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 8.1 Dog Control Service Update

*Note* This is only snippets, please click link above for entire content

SUBJECT: Dog Control Service Update

Purpose:
To provide an update on the Dog Control Service and the programs being offered to dog owners across the region.

Recommendation:
THAT the Regional Board receive for information the June 2014 Dog Control Program Performance Measure Statistics and the Dog Control Service Update.

Executive Summary:
As the Board is aware, the new service model for dog control is centred around responsible dog ownership. Allan Neilson in his dog control service review to the Board noted: "The concept recognizes that local government on its own cannot effectively manage human-dog interactions. Dog owners must be active partners in working to prevent problems from occurring and in holding other owners accountable for good dog behaviour...When owners care properly for their dogs, train their dogs, and develop a good understanding of their rights and responsibilities, the number and severity of dog-related problems and the need for enforcement decreases.

Below is a review of the programs provided for a more valued, cost effective service:

o Resource Group: The Resource Group continues to meet as needed. Two meetings have been held this year, the last one being July 23. The SPCA provided an update on the education programs they offer to schools and the summer program at their education facility. Three of our dog control officers are participating in the SPCA's summer kids program assisting in educating children of all ages on things like: being a responsible dog owner, how to approach a dog, how to pet a dog, etc. This has been well received. One of our animal control officers provided a presentation to the group on the dangerous side of being an animal control officer such as assisting the RCMP when required, and dealing with dangerous dog attacks. Both presentations were well received.

o Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343: As you are aware the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw was adopted in February 2014 and is working very well. An outstanding issue remains to be resolved regarding raising the number of dogs allowed from 2 to 3. It had previously been noted that should this occur a minor zoning amendment regarding kennels would be required by the RDCO and the District of West Kelowna. Staff has forwarded a letter to the District of West Kelowna Council asking if they will consider amending their zoning bylaw. Staff has yet to hear back from West Kelowna. The electoral area directors have supported the requirement to amend RDCO's zoning bylaw.

o My Dog Matters Rewards Program - The program was created in 2013 to reward dog owners who license their dog(s) and provide them with benefits for licensing. Licensed dog owners receive discounts and special services from participating businesses by simply showing their My Dog Matters rewards card at the time of purchase. Dog owners have found they quickly recover the cost of licensing by using their card to receive discounts on products and services offered by the many proud partners participating in the rewards program. Ten new businesses have come on-board bringing the total to 45 businesses participating in the program.

o Zero Tolerance for No Dog License - The fine for not having a dog license is $300. We continue to advertise that there is 'zero tolerance' for not having a dog license. To date this year, 269 tickets have been issued. Some owners have received $900 in fines-so as not to be too punitive a policy was adopted (for the first offence only) that gives the owner 7 days to purchase their license(s) and when that is done, the officer will withdraw all but one fine. To date 20 fines have been withdrawn. Some owners are disputing the fine and these are then forwarded to adjudication. To date, 18,169 licenses have been sold (14,200 renewals and 3,709 new dogs). At this time last year, 11,409 licenses had been sold. Staff is aware that there are outstanding licenses not renewed from 2013 and as time permits are phoning owners to determine why-some dogs have died and the owner has failed to inform the RDCO, and some owners have moved, others have forgotten to renew and are advised to renew as soon as possible.

o On Line Licensing: Staff continues to work with the software developer for the on-line licensing program in an attempt to make the program more user friendly. We want more licensed dog owners renewing their licenses online-saving resources at our member municipalities, SPCA and the RDCO.

o Ambassador Program: Two students have been hired for the summer to introduce our newly created ambassador program. The ambassadors visit beaches, trails and pathways from Lake Country to Peachland. Instead of enforcing bylaws or handing out tickets, the brightly-dressed ambassadors are positively reminding dog owners about responsible behaviours. The aim of the program is to educate, rather than enforce. They hand out information about the bylaw, where dog beaches are located, as well as parks and businesses involved in the 'My Dog Matters' program. Leashes, dog treats and poop bags are provided as a gift to the dog owner. Weekly field reports are provided by the students and are circulated to our dog control officers, as well as all municipal parks managers highlighting issues such as lack of signage, where problem areas are, info about where dog owners feel dog parks should be located (particularly beach access parks). The program has been well received by dog owners and provides a positive opportunity to raise awareness and reinforce expected behaviours.

o Staff continue to work with the SPCA to adopt healthy, adoptable dogs, and build on the great relationship we have developed between both organizations.

 

Regional District of Central Okanagan Program Performance Measure Results  - April to June 2014
RDCO Dog Control Stats April - June 2014 plus 2013 inclusive
please click image for a larger copy


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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 28, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (31.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 28, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Dog Control Service Update - .wma (3.91 MB)

.pdf icon July 28, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

8. CORPORATE SERVICES

Bylaw Enforcement

8.1 Dog Control Service Update/Statistics (for information) (All Directors Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated July 24,2014 provided an update on dog control service and stats to June 30, 3014. To date, dogs licensed has increased to 18,169 (from 11,409 in 2013) with an additional 3,709 new dogs licensed this year. Staff continues to work on programs such as the online licensing to make it more user friendly; increasing partners in the 'My Dog Matters Rewards Program'; and working with the SPCA on continuing education and adoption of dogs to new homes. The newly created Ambassador Program is well underway positively reminding dog owners about responsible behaviours. The administrative policy adopted for multiple fines for non-licenses was reviewed. Staff will review the policy in 2015 and determine if any changes to the policy and bylaw amendments are required going forward. West Kelowna confirmed that staff have been considering the required bylaw amendment should the Board agree to amending the region's bylaw to a three-dog limit.

BAKER/FINDLATER
THAT the Board receive for information the Dog Control Service Update and Program Performance Measure Statistics - April-June 2014.

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 28, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (31.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 28, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Dog Control Service Update - .wma (3.91 MB)

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.pdf icon July 17, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Nothing was mentioned in the Highlights about Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer Rhoda Mueller being on sick leave for a few months, and that a replacement was being hired to take her place.

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 17, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (4.47 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 17, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (188 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 17, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.4 and Item 8.1 being added to the Agenda as a late item - .wma (302 KB)

.pdf icon July 17, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 8.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment

Executive Summary:
The Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer is currently on leave, and there is a need to have a bylaw enforcement officer appointed to manage bylaw enforcement issues, if and when required, within the region's electoral areas. Diane Merenick has recently joined the Regional District as the Bylaw Enforcement Coordinator and has the experience to fulfil this role as required.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Diane Merenick be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 17, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (4.47 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 17, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (188 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 17, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.4 and Item 8.1 being added to the Agenda as a late item - .wma (302 KB)

.pdf icon July 17, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

2. ADDITION OF LATE ITEMS

5.4 Ministry Letter - Late 2013 Financial Statements

8.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment

====================

8. NEW BUSINESS

8.1 Appointment of Bylaw Enforcement Officer - Diane Merenick (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated July 16 outlined the requirement for appointment of a Bylaw Enforcement Officer.

FINDLATER/ZIMMERMANN
THAT Diane Merenick be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio July 17, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (4.47 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 17, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (188 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files July 17, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 5.4 and Item 8.1 being added to the Agenda as a late item - .wma (302 KB)

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RDCO LAWYER ETC. REMUNERATION
(click the year links to see where we got these figures from)

NAME 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Neilson-Welch Consulting (Dog Control Consultant) 0.00 0.00 $61,244.40 NO DATA??  
Desouza Arnold LLP (Dog Control Lawyer) 0.00 0.00 0.00 $47,871.32  
Young Anderson (RDCO Lawyer) $38,757.57 $39,548.36 $70,562.21 $47,884.45  
Justice Institute of BC $32,924.98 $28,814.79 0.00 0.00  
Commissionaires British Columbia $29,639.18 $32,592.36 $32,698.22 $27,241.13  
Stewart McDannold Stuart $34,263.87 $64,493.46 $109,439.87 0.00  
Farris Vaughan Wills & Murphy LLP $207,130.65 $25,558.46 $51,368.04 $33,326.41  

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July 9, 2014 we called RDCO and were told that Rhoda Mueller is still on sick leave.  We were put through to Mary Jane Drouin and Robert Hobson's answering machine.

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Just heard June 11, 2014 that Chief Bylaw Enforcement Officer Rhoda Mueller is on stress leave for a few months and that Deneen McArthur who was Deputy Chief Election Officer in Feb 2014 is now the contact person for dog control.

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Dog Ambassadors Remind the Okanagan about Puppy Laws
Kelowna Now - July 15, 2014 - by Wendy McLeod

Dog owners not in compliance with Central Okanagan Regional District laws will be getting a friendly “paws-itive” reminder from Dog Ambassadors.

The Central Okanagan Ambassador program is up and running with summer students working on the ground and providing dog owners with support for expected responsible behaviors.

Regional District Communications Officer Bruce Smith says the ambassadors will not be handing our tickets for violations.

“Our Dog Ambassadors acknowledge dog owners that have made responsible choice, while giving those that haven’t a gentle reminder of what’s expected of them in order to comply with our Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw, avoiding any future financial enforcement consequences.”

They won’t just be educating locals. “Our Ambassadors are out in the community and are a resource for dog-oriented information, not only resident dog owners but those who may be vacationing with their four-legged friends.”

The ambassadors will be armed with information on where dog beaches are located, the leashed and off-leash parks as well as vets, groomers and kennels for pets.

“We’re also reminding licensed dog owners about the My Dog Matters Rewards program and encouraging them to regularly visit the mydogmatters.ca website, which has added several new businesses. And we’ve got some goodies, leashes and dog teats for those pets and their owners that are doing the right things,” says Smith.

Dog Ambassadors will be giving positive reminders to dog owners about expected responsible behaviors.


(Photo Credit: Regional District of Central Okanagan)

Dog Ambassadors can be easily spotted in their brightly coloured shirts and will be visiting beaches, trails and pathways from Lake Country to Peachland.

A reminder for dog owners that there is a Zero Tolerance for unlicensed dogs and will result in a $300 fine. Fines will also be issued for owners who fail to leash or pick up after their dogs. For further information on dog licensing and Responsible Dog Ownership in the Central Okanagan, visit the Regional District’s website.

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Dog bylaw bites owner
Castanet.net - by Ragnar Haagen | Story: 117860 - Jun 25, 2014


Photo: Contributed - Ralf Slotta

Ralf Slotta lost his dog Bonnie to the local pound, after she escaped for the fourth time since March 2013.
It’s just one more reminder for people in the Okanagan to ensure their dogs are kept at home and under control.

A Kelowna resident recently found out the hard way that he’s losing his nine-year-old Shepherd Husky mix due to mounting bylaw bills from the Regional District of the Central Okanagan.

Ralf Slotta has had Bonnie since she was born and they’ve had numerous adventures together.

However she managed to escape from her yard last week by digging a hole under the fence and was picked up and taken to the pound for the fourth time in just over one year. Slotta was out of town at the time and didn’t find out until he returned this past weekend.

Due to these recurring bylaw offences, it means he now owes the RDCO over $500 to get his dog back, in addition to a $20 per day charge that it’s costing to keep her in the pound since getting picked up.

“I did everything I could to keep her in the home and the officers (from Central Okanagan Dog Control Services) actually stated I did everything I could to keep her in the home,” he says.

“She is one of those dogs. She wants to go around. She’s no harm to no one.”

But Bruce Smith, spokesperson with the RDCO, says that’s not the reasoning behind the bylaw.

“A person who chooses to own a dog has a responsibility to ensure that dog is under their care and control at all times in order to protect the public. And that’s what it's about. You choose to own a dog; it’s not a right. A person makes a choice to own a dog and with that choice comes responsibility.”

The fine structure escalates with the number of bylaw offences, and the monetary amounts are in line with other jurisdictions.

“There’s an escalating fine structure and under the bylaw – which is all about responsible dog ownership – for a licensed dog at large, the first offence is free and the dog gets returned,” explains Smith.

“The second offence is $100, the third offence is $250, and each subsequent violation is an additional $300 dollars, which is why we’re at the $550.”

The animal’s owner in these cases have 72-hours to come forward and claim the dog, but if they have not or cannot pay the fine, then they cannot claim the dog. The animal will then be taken to the SPCA if it is adoptable.

“All I know is it was at large and at large frequently. Like I said, this is the fourth offence since March 2013,” says Smith.

Slotta meanwhile is concerned that Bonnie will be disposed, which is also one of the RDCO’s options.

He fought back tears as he talked about his companion in a worse case scenario. A letter addressed to him stated that after the 72-hour time limit, the RDCO can choose either option as they see fit.

“When she goes out she comes back on her own, nobody has to bring her -- she knows where she lives. I don’t know what drives her, but that’s her character, she wants to see what’s out there,” says Slotta.

“But now people are afraid to do the wrong thing and then they call the dog bylaw and then they have to pick her up and give her back to me.”

Slotta has another dog that happens to be part of Bonnie’s litter.

His name is Toby and is of the same breed, but doesn’t have the same urge to escape.

Slotta hopes that doesn’t change.

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Dogs in cars
Castanet.net - by Contributed | Story: 116670 - Jun 6, 2014

Once again I am thoroughly disgusted in how RDCO handled the recent case on Friday of a dog (Pom) left in a hot car with the windows rolled up initially, at Superstore in Kelowna.

We have a brand new Regional District Dog Bylaw that was just adopted Feb 24, 2014 that reads as follows:

Dogs in vehicles
33. No Owner shall cause or permit his or her dog to be confined to an enclosure or vehicle without adequate ventilation and sufficient shade to protect the dog from excessive heat and direct rays of the sun; conversely cold weather precautions should be taken as well.

The Castanet.net article I read said that the dog owner did not receive a ticket because the SPCA informed RDCO that the dog was not in distress once it was saved from the vehicle.

This is the most ridiculous statement I have ever read.

Do we have to wait until a dog dies before someone can be ticketed for their dog being left in a hot car with the windows rolled up. Especially when there were so many witnesses to this incident??

Please write to your MLA, MP, RDCO, Ministry of Sport and Cultural Development, the Justice Minister, and the SPCA to let them know that this is not acceptable to you and that animal cruelty legislation needs to change.

Also please sign up on the mailing list at Terry's Law http://www.terryslaw.ca/our-story/ ... because the people behind Terry's Law have crafted some animal cruelty legislation that is being looked at right now by our government. There are many animal lovers behind this crafted legislation. If and when the time comes, we need to be ready to sign a petition for this legislation, so please sign up on this mailing list.

Sharon Schnurr

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Owner of dog attacked by pit bull advocates for dog insurance
AM1150 - 6/2/2014 - by Adam Graham

It's an all too familiar story. A pit bull attacks a smaller dog and the owner of the dog who gets attacked is stuck with a hefty vet bill.

Lisa Harrison says her vet bill is $756 after her spaniel named Domino suffered lacerations and deep tissue damage around his leg at the intersection of Springfield Road and Wilkinson Street in Kelowna on Thursday night. She claims the pit bull was not on a leash when it crossed the street and latched onto Domino's leg.

However, she thinks she may have to take the pit bull's owner to small claims court to receive payment and says there should be a better way to resolve the dispute.

"Forcing him to pay me would require probably involving a lawyer. Even if I win the small claims case, I don't know that he will necessarily pay," says Harrison. "I have heard so many stories about these situations. Even a police officer said that her dog got attacked and it was a $1200 vet bill and even a police officer was not able to collect the money."

Harrison is advocating for a type of dog insurance, similar to how car insurance works.

"Maybe we need a system more like car insurance where if somebody causes an accident you don't have to go chase that person down for payment. We've got a system in place where an investigator will determine who's at fault and then if that person wants to keep that car on the road, they're going to be paying a bigger premium and maybe we could do something like that with dogs," explains Harrison.

For now, Harrison says she will carry a walking stick from now on and be more willing to defend her dog if another attack occurs.

The Regional District of the Central Okanagan has confirmed that Harrison's spaniel was attacked and they are investigating, but would not provide further details on the incident or why the pit bull's owner has not paid at this time.

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Dog left in 40-degree car
Castanet.net - by Carmen Weld | Story: 116261 - May 30, 2014


Photo: Trevor Rockliffe

This little dog was locked in a 38 degree car May 12 in downtown Kelowna. The owner was also from Alberta.
Another of man's best friends was put at risk Friday morning in Kelowna after being left in a car for over 30 minutes. The inside temperature of the vehicle reached 42 degrees.

Just after 10 a.m. Scott Hermanson was walking into The Real Canadian Superstore to collect supplies for his food truck company when he saw the little dog in distress and acted.

“I noticed the little dog barking in a car with Alberta plates with all the windows rolled up,” explains Hermanson.

Immediately he says he called dog control and the SPCA and then went on a hunt for the owner. He had a tip, from a fellow shopper of what the owner looked like.

“I said to him how would you like to be locked inside your car with the windows up right now?”, said an angry Hermanson. “I told him, 'we don't appreciate people locking dogs in their cars.'"

He says that he warned the man he had called police and wanted to give him a chance to rectify the situation.

“I gave him the benefit of the doubt to go outside and sit with his dog, but he went outside and all he did was roll the windows down a crack and walk back in the store,” says Hermanson in disbelief.

He says he could tell the dog needed help and he was ready to take action himself.

“The dog was in distress, it was panting like crazy. I was at the point where I was going to break the window out. I asked the RCMP if it was alright to break the window and save the dog, and they told me no.”

Shortly after that the SPCA arrived and conducted readings on the car and the crowd around the car grew, prompting the owners to come back outside.

“The owner came out and obviously some members of the public were quite obviously frustrated and upset with these people. I spoke with the owners and explained to them that they cannot be leaving their animals in their vehicle and issued them a BCSPCA order and then dog control also attended,” explained BC SPCA responder Special Provincial Constable Dan Chapman.

He says when they got there they found the dog in the car with two of the windows open about an inch and the animal was hiding in the foot well with the sun directly on the car.

“It was 14 degrees outside and we used our temperature gun and inside the vehicle it was actually over 40 degrees,” says Chapman who adds the dog had been inside for at least 30-minutes without water.

“An animal always has to have access to water and in this case the animal had no access to water, the owner claims they gave it water before it was left in the car, but either way an animal cannot be left in a vehicle in warm temperatures, it is illegal in Kelowna and they can be fined.

Hermanson says when the owners came out they couldn't believe why he and others were so upset that her dog was in her car with the windows rolled up. A problem, Chapman says, the BC SPCA constantly deals with.

“We have to educate everyone, some people don't realize and don't think they are doing wrong,” says Chapman. “A vehicle is like an oven, there is no circulation, even with windows open it doesn't matter, and that windshield magnifies everything. The dog cannot let itself out of the vehicle and once it starts reading temperatures over 42 degrees that's when things like organ failure starts to happen.”

Hermanson hopes this story and so many like it, including another one in Kelowna just a few weeks ago, will save more dogs as the summer temps climb.

“I just want to bring awareness to it, 45 degrees in the car and dogs die and that takes no time, it wasn't even that hot this morning.”

Witnesses on the scene say Kelowna Dog Control attended and issued the owners a $150 ticket, but Regional District of Central Okanagan communications Bruce Smith says the owner was only issued a warning ticket as the SPCA informed them the dog was not in distress once it was saved from the vehicle.

Please contact the BC SPCA Call Centre: 1 (855) 6BC SPCA (1-855-622-7722) toll free to report animal cruelty, neglect, and animals in distress, including wildlife.

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Reinforcing Dog Owner Responsibilities with a Grin

It’s said ‘You can catch more bees with honey than with vinegar.’ The Regional District hopes using a little humour will resonate with more Central Okanagan dog owners.

New signs can be found along the hugely popular Mission Creek Greenway multi-user recreational corridor and will find their way over the coming weeks in many Regional Parks. They use light-hearted messaging to encourage more dog owners to leash their pets and pick up after them. These are two common sources of complaints.

For example one sign reads, ‘Make sure your dog doesn’t leave anything behind! Catch our drift?’ Another says, ‘Attention Dog guardians please pick up after your dogs. Attention dogs, Grrr, bark, woof. Good dog. Thank you!’ And a third says, ‘If your dog poops and you don’t scoop…but nobody sees you…does that mean it won’t stick to the bottom of my shoe?’

Communications Officer Bruce Smith says, “While picking up and leashing are required from all dog owners in the Central Okanagan under the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw, we believe that a light-hearted, message will have more impact, resulting in more dog owners controlling their pets in public places. We all know that dog poop is a nuisance that can be easily avoided simply by carrying a bag and using it to pick up after your pet, then disposing of it in proper manner. Having a dog on a leash of two meters or less is a bylaw requirement as it provides a handler with greater control over their animal and less opportunity for conflict with other residents.”

Smith adds, “Those dog owners that fail to clean up their dog’s poop, don’t do any favours for those that do and can give all dog owners a bad name. Dog poo left behind in parks, on boulevards and sidewalks and on other people’s property is one of the most common complaints we and our municipal partners hear about, right across the region. Running a close second is owners that don’t have control over their dogs. We hope the messages from these signs will further encourage dog owners to get on board and be a responsible and thoughtful citizen.”

Also this summer, the Regional District will be introducing Dog Ambassadors and volunteer Parks VIP Patrollers to the community. Smith says, ‘Our goal with these programs is to provide an opportunity for further awareness and information to dog owners and park users and for positive interaction and encouragement of responsible behaviors. We want to acknowledge dog owners that have made responsible choices while giving those that haven’t a chance to understand what’s expected of them so that they choose to comply with our Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw, avoiding any future financial enforcement consequences.”

There’s plenty of information available about dog licensing and Responsible Dog Ownership in the Central Okanagan. Check out regionaldistrict.com/dogs for information about the Regional Dog service and what to do if you lose or find a dog.

Dog owners are reminded that failing to leash and failing to pick up after their pet could result in fines under the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw. As well, there is Zero Tolerance for unlicensed dogs resulting in a $300 fine. Licenses are available at all local government offices, the Regional Dog Pound (890 Weddell Place) and the Kelowna SPCA branch. With the nicer weather and more people visiting parks and public areas across the Central Okanagan, you can expect to see more Dog Control Officers out on patrol.

(May 14, 2014)

Source:  RDCO Whats New

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.pdf icon April 28, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 8.2 Dog Control Service Performance Measures Statistics

*Note* This is only a snippet, please click link above for entire content.

Q1 2013 / January to March 2014

470 / 451 General Complaints
86 / 74 Dangerous and Aggressive Dog Complaints
12 / 8 Emergency pages requiring a callout
572 / 525 Total Complaints Received

63 / 101 Non-Complaint Responses/Patrol
16,908 / 16,598 Total Dog Licences

149 / 154 Dogs Impounded
104 / 89 Dogs Impounded without Licences (58%)

108 / 121 Dogs Reunited with Owner (79%)
20 / 21 Dogs for SPCA (14%)
19 / 12 Dogs Euthanized (8%)

100 / 4 Municipal Tickets Issued
2 / 5 Disputed or Awaiting Trial
1 / 0 Heard at Trial

na / 171 Bylaw Offence Notices Issued
na / 25 Bylaw Offence Notices Disputed
na / 4 Heard at Adjudication
na / 3 Dangerous Dog Applications Concluded by Consent Order
na / 0 Dangerous Dog Applications Pending for trial or Outstanding

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.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio April 28, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (31.3 MB)

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.pdf icon April 28, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

8.2 Dog Control Service Performance Measure Statistics - Year-to-date March 31,2014 (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

OPHUS/BAKER
THAT the Dog Control Service Performance Measure Statistics - Year-to-date March 31, 2014 be received for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

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SPCA seeing more animal cruelty
Daily Courier Staff | Posted 2 months ago from June 11, 2014 - mobile

Starving dogs and cats shot with pellets are nothing unusual to Kathy Woodward.

The local animal protection boss investigates cases of cruelty across the Southern Interior for the SPCA. Incidents the organization revealed this week are shocking to animal lovers, but the sad truth is they’re pretty common.

“This happens every day of the week. We get calls provincewide all the time that are similar in nature,” Woodward said Wednesday.

A German-shepherd puppy suffered several pellet-gun wounds earlier this month. Passersby found the pooch cowering under a bush in Niskonlith Park near Chase. They took the four-month-old to Salmon Arm, where a veterinarian surgically removed the pellets. One was a millimetre from the puppy’s aorta.

Woodward doesn’t know who fired the gun. The vet covered the medical costs and a clinic employee plans to adopt the dog.

“The owner came forward and couldn’t provide care or surgery. She surrendered it to the clinic.”

A cat found by a highway near Cranbrook was shot seven times by a pellet gun. The animal had a gashed neck, as if someone tried to cut its head off, said Brenna Baker, who manages the SPCA’s East Kootenay branch.

The feline got stitched up and needs dental surgery because many of its teeth were shot. The pellets were removed from its head.

The most disturbing case involved an adult terrier-cross found dead in an enclosed crate at a truck turnaround in Glacier National Park near Revelstoke. Feces in the crate suggest the dog was alive when abandoned.

Authorities have ordered a necropsy.

“With the temperatures we’ve had, it could be difficult to determine the time of death,” Woodward said. “The vet determined it was 11 pounds and should have been 35 . . . It would appear that the dog was starved to death.”

Until recently, such cruelty was reported sporadically in the Interior. More people are aware of a provincial call centre that opened last year, which may explain the spike in abuse reports.

Most calls are resolved by talking to owners and educating people, Woodward said.

“People think they can put a horse out on grass and stop feeding it hay . . . You have lots of grass but not enough nutrients to sustain a horse. You need to supplement its diet with hay this time of year.”

Owners may be unaware that dogs in back yards must have a dog house or other shelter all year round so they’re protected from rain, wind, heat and the cold, she said.

Dog-control staff are preparing for another busy season rescuing overheated canines from hot cars. Woodward has already heard barking dogs in parking lots at Real Canadian Superstore and Orchard Park mall.

“We put a reminder note on the windshield to remind them it’s starting to get warm. It doesn’t take long for a dog to have irreversible effects from heat exhaustion.”

Leaving an animal in a hot vehicle can cost you $150. The Central Okanagan legislated a new bylaw in February, making it the first jurisdiction in the province to levy the fine.

“We’re not dealing with distress to animal, but how the dog is kept,” said Chief Bylaw Officer Rhoda Mueller. “We’re working together with the SPCA and/or the RCMP. Now it’s not just a matter of getting a dog out of a vehicle (by smashing the window) — it could be a fine as well.”

If you know an animal is suffering abuse or suspect cruelty, call 1-855-622-7722.

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.pdf icon March 28, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

There are no Highlights of the Budget Meeting

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.pdf icon March 28, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

4. FINANCE DEPARTMENT

4.1 Quarterly Program Measures Report (year-to-date December 31, 2013)
Staff report dated March 21, 2014 highlighted the program measures for year-to-date December 31, 2013. Surpluses and deficits have been accounted for in the 2014 budget.
The executive memo was highlighted. As previously requested, a more condensed version will be provided in the future.
The year-end detailed program measures report is provided for the Board's reference and review. It was noted that there are a number of surpluses at the end of the year where staff have not able to get all the work completed by year-end. It would be useful to identify where there is activity around the surplus... budgeted work not yet completed. Good to see reserves are being put away. More online customer service is being introduced. Congratulations to staff for the work putting this concise document together.

BASRAN/FINDLATER
THAT the Quarterly Program Measures report, year-to-date December 31, 2013 be received for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

====================

4.2 2014 - 2018 Financial Plan Introduction

a) Review of changes following the March 13, 2014 Governance & Services Committee meeting
It was noted that the 2014-2018 Financial Plan has been discussed at two Governance & Services meetings (Feb. 27 and March 13). Any changes recommended have been incorporated into the final budget. The final requisition amounts will differ in accordance with the 2014 Revised Roll from the BC Assessment Authority which is made available in April (April 10th deadline).
b) Review of 2014 Tax Rates


click image for a larger copy

==================

4.3 Public Comment on 2014 - 2018 Financial Plan
There were no comments from the public in the gallery. Staff confirmed that the financial plan has been posted on the RDCO website and advertisement on the financial process completed.

==================

4.4 Regional District of Central Okanagan 2014 - 2018 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1347,2014, 1st, 2nd and 3rd readings and Adoption (All Directors - Weighted Vote)

EDGSON/BAKER
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan 2014 - 2018 Financial Plan Bylaw No. 1347, 2014 be given first, second and third readings and adopted.

CARRIED (opposed Findlater, Ophus)

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.pdf icon March 24, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Nothing was mentioned in the Highlights about Item 6.1 Bylaw Officer Appointment

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.pdf icon March 24, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 6.1 Bylaw Officer Appointment

*Note* This is only a snippet, click link above for entire content

Purpose:
Board Appointment is required to enforce and administer bylaws of the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Executive Summary:
Susan Maygard joined the Dog Control service on January 22, 2014, as a Dog Control Officer I, to cover a term position for a leave of absence within the department. Susan has previously been employed as a RDCO 911 Telecommunications Operator in the Southeast District Operational Communications Centre, for over 24 years.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Susan Maygard be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer and Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control Bylaws and dog related issues of the Parks Bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

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.pdf icon March 24, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

6. CORPORATE SERVICES

6.1 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

BASRAN/EDGSON
THAT Susan Maygard be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer and Animal Control Officer for the Dog Control bylaws and dog related issues of the Parks bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

CARRIED Unanimously

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DID YOU KNOW THAT BARKING FARM DOGS IS NOT A RIGHT TO FARM PRACTICE?

Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act

7. IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR STAFF OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries

FACTS
British Columbia’s new Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act benefits farmers and residents who live in or near farming communities by supporting farmers who use normal farm practices, establishing a new process to resolve complaints about farm practices, and encouraging local governments to support farming in their local plans and bylaws.

This new legislation represents a new partnership between local governments and the province to work together to strengthen farming in communities throughout B.C. Local governments and their staff should be aware of the important changes
brought about by the new legislation.

What does the act say?
The act says that farmers have the “right to farm” in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) provided they use “normal farm practices” and follow other legislation listed in the act. The act defines farm operations as activities undertaken by a farm business
- in general, all of the activities or practices needed to grow, produce, raise or keep animals or plants.

When a farmer has the “right to farm,” it means that noises, odours, dust or other disturbances that result from normal farm practices are not subject to nuisance lawsuits or to a local government’s nuisance and miscellaneous bylaws.

Why is the province bringing in this new legislation?
The ALR has been very successful in protecting the agricultural land base but it does not extend to protection of farming. Some farmers have found it difficult to farm because of a variety of constraints placed on their activities by local government bylaws. The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the Agricultural Land Commission will help local governments plan for farming so that the potential for conflicts about farm practices can be reduced.

When do nuisance or miscellaneous bylaws apply to farmers?
Farm operations which use normal farm practices are protected under the new legislation, but any activities unrelated to the business of farming continue to be subject to nuisance or miscellaneous bylaws. For example, harvesting crops, managing
manure, irrigating, and feeding or moving livestock are within the definition of farm operation. However, loud parties on a farm or barking farm dogs are not farm operations and can be controlled with these bylaws.

What about farming operations outside of the ALR?
The right to farm outside of the ALR protects farmers from nuisance lawsuits only. While the right to farm does not over-ride nuisance and miscellaneous bylaws for farming operations outside of the ALR, the ministry is still available to assist local government staff with information and resolution of concerns. Complaints about farm practices can also be made to the Farm Practices Board.

What about weed control bylaws or the management of farm animals at large?
Some provisions of nuisance or miscellaneous bylaws can still be used to control farm activities when normal farm practices are not used on a farm. For example, the failure of a farmer to control noxious weeds or to contain livestock in established
pound areas are situations where a weed-control bylaw or animal-control bylaw could be enforced.

How will local government staff know when to enforce a bylaw?
When staff are not sure if a farm practice is a “normal farm practice” or part of a “farm operation,” they may contact the local office of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries for assistance. If the farmer claims the right to farm, and thus
protection from the bylaw, the ministry can help determine the status of the practice.
If the matter cannot be resolved quickly or satisfactorily, the Farm Practices Board can rule on whether the farmer is using normal farm practices or not.

What do local government staff do when complaints come in about farm practices?
Local governments have long been the point of first contact for complaints about farming practices. The new legislation offers two new avenues for handling of concerns or complaints about farm practices.

The ministry has established an informal process, designed to be an inexpensive and efficient alternative to the more formal Farm Practices Board. Concerns are addressed using regional and district ministry staff or farmers’ peers - people who have expertise in farm practices and who have specific training in solving these types of problems.

If the ministry office is unable to resolve a complaint, it may be filed with the Farm Practices Board. The board will determine whether the farmer is using normal farm practices. The board can order the practice stopped or changed to conform with normal farm practice. If necessary, public hearings are held so that all parties to the complaint can be involved.

What about complaints about a practice similar to a farmer’s, but not on a farm?
The new legislation only applies to farm operations as part of a farm business.

Source downloaded to OkanaganLakeBC.ca

============================

Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act

The Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act (FPPA) applies to farmers who operate in the ALR, in other areas where farming is permitted by local zoning bylaws, or in areas licensed for aquaculture. When farmers operate under "normal farm practices", the Act protects the farmer against nuisance actions, court injunctions, or specific nuisance bylaws related to the operation of the farm.

The FPPA established the Farm Practices Board (now called the Farm Industry Review Board) as the tribunal that considers complaints from persons aggrieved by odour, noise, dust, or other disturbances resulting from farm operations, and encourages settlement of the complaints. In the case of complaints that are not settled, the Board will hear the complaints and determine whether the disturbance in question results from normal farm practices.

BC Ministry of Agriculture staff throughout the province may also work with persons concerned about a farm practice in an attempt to resolve the concern before the complaint reaches the Board.

The Board, on its own initiative, upon the request of a local government or as directed by the Minister of Agriculture and Lands, may study any matter related to farm practices and report its findings and recommendations.

http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/resmgmt/sf/keylegisl.htm

============================

Farm Practices Protection
(Right to Farm) Act
[RSBC 1996] CHAPTER 131

Local Government Act
Right to Farm Regulation
Note: Check the Cumulative Regulation Bulletin 2013 and 2014
for any non-consolidated amendments to this regulation that may be in effect.
[includes amendments up to B.C. Reg. 187/2001]

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2013 Budget/2014 Proposed Budget for Dog Control Comparison

2013/2014 General Revenue Fund Budget

Revenue             2013 / 2014
Dog Licensing $333,550 / $390,000
Tax Requisition - Kelowna $573,510 / $583,829
Tax Requisition - Peachland $28,403 / $27,817
Tax Requisition - Lake Country $61,847 / $62,571
Tax Requisition - West Kelowna $146,878 / $147,455
Tax Requisition - Central Okanagan West $21,996 / $21,863
Tax Requisition - Central Okanagan East $17,890 / $18,130
Previous Years Deficit -$37,056 / $74,938
Other Revenue (WFN) $500.00 / $0.00
Impounding $42,000 / $35,000
Ticketing $20,000 / $5,000
Bylaw Adjudication $0.00 / $20,000
Admin Overhead -$136,965 / -$165,203
Total Revenue $1,072,553 / $1,221,400

Expenses
Operations -$947,553 / -$1,071,400
Grant to SPCA -$67,000 / -$92,000
Transfer to Equipment Reserves -$28,000 / -$28,000
Transfer to Facilities Reserves -$30,000 / -$30,000
Total Expenses -$1,072,553 / $1,221,400

FTE (Fulltime Equivalent) 9.138 / 10.460
2013 Residential Tax Rate (per $1000 of assessment) 0.0242
2014 Residential Tax Rate (per $1000 of assessment) 0.0245
TOTAL TAX REQUISITION $850,524 / $861,665

========================================

General Capital Fund Budget

Revenue
Transfer from Facilities Reserve $67,700 / $39,730
Sale of Asset $6,000 / $5,500
Transfer from Equipment Reserves $53,000 / $37,607
Total Revenue $126,700 / $82,837

Expenses
Vehicles -$59,000 / -$36,090
Computer Equipment -$8,000 / -$3,008
Software -$24,700 (for online dog licencing) / -$19,285
Security -$10,000 / -$7,750
Kennel Irrigation -$25,000 / -$10,150
Kennel Improvements - $0.00 / -$3,045
Bicycles - $0.00 / -$3,509
Total Expenses -$126,700 / -$82,837

=======================================

Note at bottom of page says Increases in 2013 Expenses
Payroll $18,000 / $119,600
Advertising $25,000 / $25,000
Legal $14,000 / $
Building Repair and Maintenance $4,000 / $
Bylaw Notice Registry $3,500 / $
Security Services $6,000 / $
Misc $3,000 / $

========================================

There are more notes that I am not going to type out. Click the links below to read them

2013 Budget figures are from
March 28, 2013 Board Agenda (found on page 102)
.pdf icon Item 5.3 2013 2017 Financial Plan Bylaw No 1324

2014 Budget figures are from
Feb 27, 2014 RDCO Governance and Services Committee Meeting Agenda
.pdf icon Item 4.1M Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement

================================

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 17, 2012 audio of RDCO Governance and Services Committee meeting only about Item 3b Development Services - Protection Services - Dangerous Dogs, Frivolous Complaint, Retribution, $39,000 for dog control consultant - .mp3 (3.25 MB)

================

A preliminary budget has been developed for 2013 which includes: $20,000 for consulting fees;
(found on page 2)

Feb 25, 2013 RDCO Board Agenda
.pdf icon Item 10.1 Dog Control Service Review Update

================

2013 Budget Notes:
b. Increases: Dog Control Service Review $28,000 (from page 1)

March 28, 2013 RDCO Board Agenda
.pdf icon Item 5.1L Corporate Services Bylaw Enforcement

================

Figure 4.1 Suggested Changes for Budget
Anticipated Impact of $15,000 for Consulting - Continued use of consultant to assist with facilitating Dog Control Resource Group meetings, to assist in planning and implementing other stakeholder opportunities (e.g., public open house, meeting with service providers), and to assist on other implementation tasks (e.g., development of indicators for quarterly reports, development of policies to guide implementation). (page 15)

Dec 9, 2013 RDCO Board Meeting Agenda
.pdf icon Item 5.1 Dog Control Service Model Implementation Update (includes 2013 - 2014 RDCO Dog Control Resource Group Terms of Reference)

=================

CLICK HERE FOR ACTUAL REVENUE AND EXPENSES

Blue Divider Line

Hahahaha... this dog ain't stupid (he knows who is ok and who isn't)

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Letter: Warn others if your choice of dog is dangerous
Kelowna Capital News - Mar 4, 2014

To the editor:

On Aug. 5, 2011, when my child was attacked by a then deemed aggressive dog (because of a previous incident), then deemed dangerous after the attack on my son, my husband and I wrote a letter to the RDCO with a few “hopes,” one such being signage put front and back on homes where dangerous dogs were kept.

With the new living document passed on Aug. 24, 2013, by the RDCO, comes that “hope” written into the bylaws, as well as micro-chipping and the word “provoke” taken out of language that addresses dogs that perform less than safely in our towns.

In the time since then, I have read about hundreds of dangerous dog incidents, and how the word provoke is used by dangerous dog advocates. I’ve read them saying weather is a provoking factor, I’ve seen a child smelling like infant formula blamed, I’ve seen jogging on the wrong side of a dog blamed—the asinine list goes on.

Once upon a great time in society, we wouldn’t have had conversations like this surrounding dangerous dogs. Owners “regulated” them without question, it was rare that a dog’s supposed rights would come before what it hurt. It is a sad turn when those who choose to keep these types of dogs have to be told to warn the rest of society.

Being the parent of a child attacked by the breed of dog most statistically likely to cause death when attacking, I’ve learned many things. I’ve learned firstly how to be grateful, my child is alive. I’ve also learned that many of those who advocate for dogs blame everything else instead of looking at the most obvious problem, and that is dangerous dogs (whether by action or statistic) and those who keep them.

I hope that those who choose to keep dangerous dogs, or even aggressive dogs take heed, and do the right thing—put that sign up! Give others coming to your house or onto your property the chance I never had, and that was to make a choice. That choice being whether or not to take the chance of being subjected to the potential forever consequence your dog may inflict.

Muzzle and short leash your choice if you feel compelled to take it into public spaces, and then, most importantly, buck up and take responsibility for any potential future incidents. Get yourself some liability insurance, don’t leave expenses up to the victim.

I hope this living document continues to evolve, and that the RDCO Advisory Board (one I resigned from late 2013) continues to look at ways to hold the feet of those who are irresponsible with their dogs even closer to the fire.

I appreciate dogs, I have a dog, but a breed that is exceedingly safe, one who doesn’t have unpredictability and a killing bite anchored in its genetics. I often ask myself, what kind of dog owners choose less than statistically safe breeds or wonder about owners who keep dogs after dangerous incidents? Guess that is their choice, but what is their responsibility? It is indeed to set up as many safeguards as possible to make sure no innocent soul (human or animal) suffers the consequence of that choice.

Tamie Williams,
Kelowna

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RDCO's New Dog Bylaw Survey RESULTS

Only 19 people from Central Okanagan West filled out the new dog bylaw survey? Central Okanagan West Population is 1,947 according to .pdf icon June 13, 2013 RDCO Governance and Services Committee Meeting Agenda
Item 6.1 Dog Control Service Review Update

 

Q1 Have you read the proposed bylaw?
Yes 90.32% / 821
No 9.68% / 88
TOTAL 100% / 909


Q2 If you have read the proposed bylaw, do you think that it....
a) Encourages, supports and rewards dog owners 34.09% / 196 (should be 26.56%)
b) Holds dog owners accountable for their actions 94.26% / 542 (should be 73.44%)
TOTAL 128.35% / 738


Q3 Are you a resident of Central Okanagan Regional District?
Yes 96.65% / 866
No 3.35% / 30
TOTAL 100% / 896


Q4 In what jurisdiction do you live?
Central Okanagan West 2.21% / 19
(1,947 population)
Central Okanagan East 5.24% / 45 (3,795 population)
City of Kelowna 60.96% / 523 (119,229 population)
District of West Kelowna 18.07% / 155 (30,892 population)
Westbank First Nation 1.75% / 15 (7,068 population)
District of Lake Country 7.58% / 65 (11,708 population)
District of Peachland 4.20% / 36 (5,200 population)
TOTAL 100.01% / 858 (179,839 population)


Q5 Do you own a dog within the Regional District of Central Okanagan?
Yes 80.32% / 710
No 19.68% / 174
TOTAL 100% / 884


Q6 Is your dog(s) currently licensed?
Yes 88.28% / 625
No 11.72% / 83
TOTAL 100% / 708


Q7 Have you visited the mydogmatters.ca website?
Yes 51.31% / 353
No 48.69% / 335
TOTAL 100% / 688


Q8 Have you used your "My Dog Matters" rewards card?
Yes 13.08% / 90 (should be 12.31%)
No 60.90% / 419 (should be 57.32%)
I don't have a card 32.27% / 222 (should be 30.37%)
TOTAL 106.25% (should be 100%) / 688 (RDCO said 688 Total Respondents, but we counted 731?)


Q9 The current annual fee to license a dog is $20 if spayed or neutered and $60 if not. Should the annual license fees increase?
Yes 8.61% / 74
No 91.39% / 785
TOTAL 100% / 859


Q10 Should the annual license fee increase by:
  Spayed/Neutered
    $5.00 - 41.89% / 31
    $10.00 - 17.57% / 13
    $15.00 - 5.41% / 4
    $20.00 - 35.14% / 26
    TOTAL 100.01% / 74 ????????????????

  Not Spayed/Neutered
    $5.00 - 4.05% / 3
    $10.00 - 9.46% / 7
    $15.00 - 4.05% / 3
    $20.00 - 82.43% / 61
    TOTAL 100.01% / 74 ????????????????


Q11 A late fee of $20 is applied when dog owners do not renew their annual dog license by February 28. Do you agree with this late fee?
Yes 60.72% / 521
No 39.28% / 337
TOTAL 100% / 858


Q12 The majority of the dogs impounded are not licensed, do you support providing licensed dog owners with a one-time, fine-free release if their dog is impounded for running at-large?
Yes 83.02% / 709
No 16.98% / 145
TOTAL 100% / 854


Q13 The new bylaw proposes allowing three licensed dogs per house or dwelling unit, instead of only two. Do you support this?
Yes 67.02% / 571
No 32.98% / 281
TOTAL 100% / 852


Q14 Do you support the effort to keep dogs from being in distress, such as when a dog is inside a stationary vehicle or enclosure and ensuring adequate ventilation and shade?
Yes 97.76% / 830
No 2.24% / 19
TOTAL 100% / 849


Q15 Do you support the new fine of $150 for this violation?
Yes 79.27% / 673
No 20.73% / 176
TOTAL 100% / 849


Q16 Do you support increased fines for dog owners that violate key elements of the bylaw, such as: Not Licensed, At-Large, Not picking up feces, Aggressive/ Dangerous dog attacks on people/animals?
Yes 68.32% / 578
No 31.68% / 268
TOTAL 100% / 846


Q17 The new bylaw proposes that leashes be restricted to a length of 2 metres in order to effectively control a dog. Do you support this?
Yes 56.89% / 479
No 43.11% / 363
TOTAL 100% / 842


Q18 The proposed bylaw also encourages dog owners not to leave their dog tied up (tethered) longer than four hours a day. Violations will result in a fine of $150. Do you support this  measure?
Yes 78.74% / 663
No 21.26% / 179
TOTAL 100% / 842


Q19 Do you think the fine is sufficient or should it be higher?
Yes 67.22% / 566
No 32.78% / 276
TOTAL 100% / 842


Q20 Do you support the increase in the fine of $300 for not licensing your dog?
Yes 44.05% / 370
No 55.95% / 470
TOTAL 100% / 840


Q21 Should the fine be higher?
Yes 8.69% / 73
No 91.31% / 767
TOTAL 100% / 840


Q22 Do you believe that this approach will hold dog owners more accountable to license their dog(s)?
Yes 47.98% / 403
No 52.02% / 437
TOTAL 100% / 840


Q23 The new bylaw proposes a fine of $150 (up from $100) for the owner of any dog found running at-large and an increasing fine scale for dogs off leash (except in a designated off leash area): $100 for the first offence; $200 for the second offence and $300 for each subsequent off leash offense. Do you agree with these increased fines?
Yes 48.44% / 405
No 51.56% / 431
TOTAL 100% / 836


Q24 In your opinion, does this level of fine hold dog owners more accountable for controlling their dog?
Yes 51.20% / 428
No 48.80% / 408
TOTAL 100% / 836


Q25 Some dog owners do not pick up waste feces from their pet in public places like parks, sidewalks and boulevards and in their own yards. The new bylaw proposes increasing the fine for dog owners not picking up waste from their pet to $150 from $100.
How serious a problem do you consider this to be?
Extremely Serious 22.33% / 186
Very Serious 18.73% / 156
Serious 33.97% / 283
Not Serious 23.17% / 193
Don't care 1.80% / 15
TOTAL 100% / 833


Q26 Do you support the increase in the fine of $150 for this violation?
Yes 62.06% / 517
No 37.94% / 316
TOTAL 100% / 833


Q27 The proposed bylaw defines a Nuisance Dog to mean any dog that has been At Large or impounded three times in the last 12 months or whose Owner has been issued a fine three times in the last 12 months, or a dog that repeatedly charges or lunges at a fence.
Do you agree with this definition?
Yes 49.94% / 416
No 50.06% / 417
TOTAL 100% / 833


Q28 In an attempt to encourage dog owners to maintain control of their dog in all situations and to reduce serious attacks, the new bylaw proposes new fines associated with failing to control an aggressive dog ($300) or a dangerous dog ($500) resulting in serious injury to people or other animals.
Do you support this?
Yes 77.79% / 648
No 22.21% / 185
TOTAL 100% / 833


Q29 Some communities encourage responsible dog ownership and behavior by charging higher licensing fees for owners of various categories of dogs. Do support this for dogs that are deemed:

  Nuisance Dogs
    Yes 38.75% / 317
    No 61.25% / 501
    TOTAL 100% / 818

  Aggressive Dogs
    Yes 52.24% / 431
    No 47.76% / 394
    TOTAL 100% / 825

  Dangerous Dogs
    Yes 59.44% / 491
    No 40.56% / 335
    TOTAL 100% / 826


Q30 Do you think the proposed bylaw recognizes the responsibility of dog owners to be in control of their pet at all times?
Yes 59.56% / 489
No 19.12% / 157
No Comment 21.32% / 175
TOTAL 100% / 821

Source:
Feb 24, 2014 RDCO Board Agenda
.pdf icon Item 8.1 Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343

Blue Divider Line

Questions you may have about the new dog bylaw that passed 3rd reading Feb 24, 2014:

Chief Dog Bylaw Enforcement Officer Rhoda Muller called me this morning to let me know why she was in my driveway... they were patrolling for loose dogs and she will come up my driveway again she said.

She said that RDCO passed the dog bylaw:

1. She said that you can't let your dog run off leash on crown land, and that the dog bylaw applies to crown land

2. She said that if your dog is off leash outside of a park, you get a "dog at large" fine $150 not a "fail to leash" fine $100, $200, and $300 for a third offence.

3. If I am out walking my friends unlicensed dog while my friend is on vacation, I can be fined, or the owner can be fined.

4. We can use a long training leash if we hold it at the 2 meter mark.

Feb 25, 2014

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Letter: Beleaguered by ridiculous dog bylaw
Kelowna Capital News - Feb 19, 2014

To the editor:

In reply to the Regional District of the Central Okanagan’s reply about the new dog bylaw on its website’s Whats New page http://www.regionaldistrict.com/whats-new.aspx.

1. A retractable leash length of six feet is still unacceptable to me because my dog needs exercise. He wants to chase wildlife, and he jumps and climbs fences so a fence won’t work, plus I use a long 15-foot training leash. Anyone can get tangled in any length of leash.

2. RDCO has been known to enforce their dog bylaw without a warrant according to The Not So Dangerous Dogs of British Columbia facebook page and people I have talked to. RDCO also let the guy in my subdivision keep his nine dogs when he doesn’t qualify for a kennel permit.

3. RDCO said you still need to pay RDCO’s legal costs if you win a dangerous dog case.

4. You are still required to report bylaw infractions and unlicensed dogs, even if you are not fined.

5. You are still required to advise RDCO if your dog has died or been transferred to a new owner, even if RDCO cannot fine you.

6. RDCO said your dog cannot be deemed aggressive or dangerous because someone says your dog causes them emotional trauma. We all know how RDCO investigates. For instance in the case of Shadow, the verdict was the lady’s own dog bit her and Shadow was not euthanized. Most people don’t have $50,000 to take a dangerous dog case to court, so one single dog control officer can deem your dog dangerous, and then you have to submit to RDCO to have your dog euthanized if you don’t have the money. I believe that three behaviour assessments should be done.

7. In regards to the definition of aggression, what does “attempted to attack” really mean? Does it mean the dog barked and lunged on leash? I want to see a badly needed policy for dog control officers.

8. There is no reason why every dog has to be deemed aggressive or dangerous for life. Dogs can be rehabilitated with training. In the case of Tali, a conditional order was drawn up and Tali went to training. Tali is no longer required to wear a muzzle. Also I don’t see why an aggressive dog is required to be in an enclosure when outside if it has a muzzle on.

Additions:

A. RDCO has stated that the RCMP can attend to barking dogs at night when RDCO is not working. The Armstrong RCMP who work the North Westside Road area, told me that they can’t ticket anyone, because RDCO can’t or won’t enforce the ticket. (Sgt. Rob Daly of the Armstrong RCMP, 250-546-3028).

B. And did you know that RDCO has to canvass your neighbourhood to be able to ticket a barking dog, because you alone are not believable by the adjudicator?

C. How can you stay anonymous going to court? RDCO is causing neighbour relation problems telling you that you have to see the dog barking so that you can identify the dog and can take the dog owner to court. The RCMP tell me…I am not to go out for a walk on the road to try and see which dog is barking behind trees or in the dark.

I believe the RDCO should be catching barking dogs and taking dog owners to court instead of you and all your neighbours. RDCO also needs to stop telling people to take photos of barking dogs.

S Schnurr,
Kelowna

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Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw Adopted

The new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw has been adopted by the Regional District Board.

This comes after almost a year of review of other bylaws in progressive communities across the country and community input. It outlines the regulations that dog owners are expected to follow in the Central Okanagan and its member municipalities.

Communications Officer Bruce Smith says, “Our goal with the bylaw, as the name says, is to encourage, support and reward Responsible Dog Ownership in the Central Okanagan. We believe that most dog owners are good neighbours and practice the four principles of responsible dog ownership. They license their dog each year because it’s the law. They spay or neuter their pet and understand they must care and control their dog at all times and leash their dog when it’s off their property. In addition, they pick up after their dog both on and off their property. Finally, they don’t allow their dog to become a threat or nuisance to their neighbours or other citizens in the community.”

“Owners that have a responsible attitude should not have any problem with the bylaw,” says Smith. “The Regional Board has directed that those choosing not to do these things should be held accountable through the bylaw, by other dog owners and citizens across the Central Okanagan.”

Among the bylaw changes:
  • Licensed dog owners will receive a one-time ‘free’ ticket home without penalty from Dog Control in the event their dog is found at large and reported to the Regional Dog Pound.
  • A leash of two meters or less in length in order to control a dog in public areas.
  • Dogs must not be tethered for longer than four hours a day and inside a stationary vehicle or enclosure must be protected from direct sunlight and provided adequate ventilation.
  • Owners of dogs newly deemed dangerous will be required to post signs advising a dangerous dog is on the property.
  • Dog owners that let their dog run at large, off leash in an area not designated for off-leash activity or choose not to pick up after their pet face higher fines.


The Regional Board has maintained the two dog limit that was in the previous bylaw. It has asked for more information in order to consider an amendment that would raise the maximum number of dogs allowed to three.


Smith says, “With more dog owners choosing responsible behaviour, we look forward to a safer, more dog welcoming community and a continuing reduction in the number of unfortunate and in many cases preventable incidents.”

The bylaw recognizes of the goals and objectives of the Regional Dog Service Review that was adopted by the Regional Board in the fall of 2012. Information about the new bylaw, responsible dog ownership, licensing and the ‘My Dog Matters’ rewards program for licensed dog owners visit regionaldistrict.com/dogs.

Source:  RDCO's Whats New

Blue Divider Line

Last Week to Save for Dog License Renewals

Dog owners across the Central Okanagan have until this Friday, February 28th to renew their dog license for 2014, in order to save a late fee.

Dog licenses cost $20 for a pet that’s been spayed or neutered and $60 if not. Starting March 1st, a $20 late fee is added to all renewals.

All dogs must be licensed in the Central Okanagan. Licensing fees help fund dog control services and pound operations and an annual $67,000 grant to the Kelowna SPCA branch for dog adoptions, its spay/neutering and education programs. Communications Officer Bruce Smith says, “In spite of their owners best efforts, accidents do happen and dogs can get away. If a dog is wearing a license tag when it’s found and reported to Regional Dog Control, our staff can easily reunite the family by making a few phone calls, saving a trip to the pound.”

Dogs that are not licensed are subject to a $300 fine.

Smith reminds dog owners that if their pet unfortunately gets away, they should contact the Regional Dog Pound as quickly as possible. The regional dog bylaw requires that a dog be held at the pound for a minimum of 72 hours.

Dog licenses may be renewed online or in person at any local government office in the Central Okanagan and the North Westside Fire Hall. Locations are available in the Dog section of the Regional District website regionaldistrict.com/dogs. That’s also where you’ll find other information about the Regional Dog service and what to do if you lose or find a dog.

(February 24, 2014)

Blue Divider Line

There are different fine amounts inside parks and outside parks for a leash being longer than 2 meters.

In the RDCO, if your leash is longer than 2 meters or your dog is off leash, and you are INSIDE A PARK, the fine for a first offence is $100, $200 for a second offence and $300 for a third offence.

If you are OUTSIDE OF A PARK and your dog is on a leash longer than 2 meters, or off leash, the fine is $150 for a "dog at large" and there is no increasing fine amounts.

You receive a "dog at large" fine outside of a park and a "Fail to leash" fine if you are inside a park.

Compare the sections of the dog bylaw written on the .pdf icon new proposed Ticket Utilization bylaw and compare that to the sections of the .pdf icon new proposed dog bylaw as at Feb 21, 2014 before 3rd reading:

Leash means a leash with a fixed total length of 2 meters or less.

At Large means any dog on a highway or public place or on private property other than the Owner's property and not securely leashed and under the control of the Owner.

PART 6 - DOGS IN PUBLIC PLACES
Dogs At Large Prohibited
25. No Owner shall cause or permit his or her dog to be At Large.

Leashed Parks
27. No Owner will cause or permit his or her dog to be within a park designated as 'leashed,' unless the dog is kept on a secure leash held by the Owner.


Feb 24, 2014 RDCO Board Agenda
.pdf icon Item 8.1 Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343


Feb 24, 2014 RDCO Board Agenda
.pdf icon Item 8.2 8.3 Ticket Information And Utilization And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaws


Please note that at the last minute before the new dog bylaw was adopted, RDCO changed the number of dogs you are permitted to have to 2 dogs rather than 3 dogs.

 

.pdf icon click this link to see the sections of the bylaw I am referring to, we circled what we want you to notice... that the section of the bylaw shown to the left side of the fine is the section of the dog bylaw that the fine is for.  For example, "fail to leash" fine of $100, $200, $300 is for section 27 of the dog bylaw and not for any other section of the dog bylaw.  "dog at large" fine is only for section 25 of the dog bylaw for a "dog at large".

Section 27 of the dog bylaw reads:

Leash means a leash with a fixed total length of 2 meters or less.

Leashed Parks
27. No Owner will cause or permit his or her dog to be within a park designated as 'leashed,' unless the dog is kept on a secure leash held by the Owner.

So what that means is that section 27 is only for a dog within a park.  A dog inside of a park needs to be on a leash no longer than 2 meters or 6 feet and cannot be off leash unless specifically stated on a sign at the park.

Does that mean that only dogs inside parks need to be on a 2 meter leash, and dogs outside of parks don't need to be leashed?  Maybe?  Maybe an unleashed dog outside of a park is not a section 25 "dog at large" ticket, but we think it is.




Do you believe all unleashed dogs if inside or outside a park should receive the same fine?

Blue Divider Line

.pdf icon February 24, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw Adopted

The Regional Board has adopted the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343. In addition to emails and telephone inquiries about the bylaw, more than 900 responses were received to an online questionnaire and approximately 35 people attended an advertised Information Open House. After receiving this public input and in order to help clarify some areas of the bylaw, several amendments were made prior to final Board consideration. Among the changes to the bylaw: a leash is defined as being no more than two meters in length; owners of dogs newly declared dangerous will be required to post signs advising a dangerous dog is on the property and increased fines for owners of dogs that are found at large, off leash in an area not designated for off-leash activity and failing to pick up and dispose of waste. The Board has maintained the two dog maximum and requested a further report regarding the proposal to allow a three dog maximum.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio February 24, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (38.3 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about all of Item 8.1 Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343 and about Item 8.2 8.3 Ticket Information And Utilization And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaws - .wma (25.2 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 8.2 8.3 Ticket Information And Utilization And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaws - .wma (1.91 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about all directors comments about 2 dogs and passing the bylaw - .wma (8.78 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Basran - dog resource group meets once per month - .wma (346 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Bruce Smith - presentation, 18 emails, phone calls and letters - .wma (2.17 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Edgson - rambling about nothing - .wma (836 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Fielding - municipal enforcement of the dog bylaw - .wma (886 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Findlater - 2 dogs - .wma (469 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Findlater - RDCO needs to build credibility and spend money to do that - .wma (680 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Findlater - municipal zoning limited to 2 dogs and the 5 year budget - .wma (2.61 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Given - 3 dogs is ok - .wma (938 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Hobson and Mueller - during dog license amnesty month people came forward to license their 3 dogs - .wma (314 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - amendment guide services dog section - .wma (457 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - amendment re: licence and license tag - .wma (229 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - amendment to allow tags on dog harnesses - .wma (241 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - dangerous dog costs only if dog is found dangerous by the court - .wma (282 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - the dog bylaw is a living document and amendments can be made - .wma (249 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - amendment so that photo id is no longer required as well as no longer required to produce id immediately - .wma (633 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Ophus and Mueller - 2 dogs - .wma (2.33 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Stack - officers won't enforce 2 meter leash and 3 dogs ok - .wma (856 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files February 24, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Zimmerman - about staff's stretched resources - .wma (370 KB)

.pdf icon February 24, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 8.1 Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No 1343 (dog survey results)

.pdf icon Item 8.2 8.3 Ticket Information And Utilization And Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaws

*Note* This is only snippets, please click links above for entire content


The bylaw does not ban the sale of retractable leashes-owners would be required while in a public place to lock their leash at 2 meters or less. (page 2)

In addition, one impression raised on social media websites and letter writers: that the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw is giving animal control officers new, broader powers to enter private property. The bylaw (Part 3 - Right of Inspection), is clearly publicizing, the Provincial authority that has been provided to any bylaw enforcement or animal control officer, through sections of the Local Government Act and Community Charter. Section 268 of the Local Government Act (Inspections to determine whether bylaws are being followed) states: if a Board has authority to regulate, prohibit, and impose requirements in relation to a malter, the board may, by bylaw, authorize officers, employees, and agents of the regional district to enter,
at all reasonable times, on any property to inspect and determine whether all regulations, prohibitions and requirements are being met
.
All Part 3 of the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw is doing, is publically stating the authority under which animal control officers (and bylaw officers in general) are able to enforce the bylaw. In addition, Section 49 of the Community Charter sets out that an animal control officer may obtain a warrant, search a place and seize a dangerous dog. (page 4)

The bylaw will hopefully result in a reduction in the subsidy provided by general taxpayers throughout the Central Okanagan. (page 5)

Designated Off-leash Parks and Areas
28. An Owner may cause or permit his or her dog to be At Large in a designated off-leash park or area provided that the Owner complies with the following requirements:
e) The dog is healthy and has up-to-date vaccinations as defined by the American Animal Hospital Association, or acceptable titers; and (page 11-12)

 

 

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.pdf icon February 24, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

8. CORPORATE SERVICES

Dog Control Services
8.1 Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No, 1343, 3rd reading and Adoption (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated February 17, 2014 outlined the public consultation phase of the Dog Bylaw. Staff provided a review of the public input received following 2nd reading of the bylaw: on-line questionnaire (909 responses); emails/letters; phone calls; approximately 35 attended an open house (posted online the panels which were used at the open house); and spoke with individuals who have come into the office to renew their dog license. Incorrect social media efforts were corrected by a press release.
Subsequent to public input staff recommended amendments to the bylaw and reviewed the amendments with the Board.
Discussion:
- It has been a long process with the end result being a well-written bylaw.
- Concern was raised whether 3 dogs are too many in an urban area. The question was raised whether the regulation could be limited to 3 per property.
As the bylaw is written, a house with a suite or duplex, four-plex could have 3 dogs per unit. It was noted that apartments, condos, landlords, etc. are allowed to regulate the number of dogs and the size of dog on their property.
Is it possible to limit the number to three per property? Staff will need further legal advice to determine if this is possible. Staff noted that if a dog owner is responsible there should be no enforcement issue. The premise of the bylaw is responsible dog ownership.

- District of West Kelowna and the RDCO's current zoning bylaw limits the number of dogs in a hobby kennel from 3 to 20. A zoning bylaw amendment would be required to accommodate a 3 dog maximum (hobby kennel 4-20 dogs).
- 2 meter leash regulation--the intent is to keep the dog under control. Other jurisdictions have similar regulations as well.
- Noise enforcement is complaint driven as it is in the current bylaw. (What is RDCO going to do, ignore a barking dog when they notice its barking in violation, if nobody makes a complaint?)

OPHUS/BASRAN
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343,2014 be given 3rd reading and adopted, as amended:

Amendment #1:
Section 8. Upon request by an Animal Control Officer, an Owner in contravention of any provision of this Bylaw shall stop and provide the Animal Control Officer with identification giving his or her full name and current address, and the licensing information of the dog.

Amendment #2:
Definition
"Guide/Service Dog means any dog with a valid Guide Animal Certificate under the Guide Animal Act."

Amendment #3:
Section 15. Any dog registered under the Guide Animal Act and resides with a person for whom the dog provides care and assistance will not be considered in the 3-dog limit of section 14 of this Bylaw.
(1) An Owner of a dog registered under the Guide Animal Act or that is registered in the Guide/Service Dog in Training Program; or used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; shall obtain a license but not be charged licensing fees provided that the appropriate registration is presented to the Animal Control Officer."
Schedule 'B'
(g) Registered Guide/Service Dog

Amendment #4:
Definition, Section 12 and Section 28
No Charge
Dog tag means a tag attached to a dog collar or harness showing the license issued to an Owner of a dog by the Regional District.
Section 12. An Owner shall ensure that the dog tag is attached to the collar or harness worn by his or her dog at all times.
Section 28 a) "The dog wears a collar or harness and a valid dog tag;"

Amendment #5
Section 60 - An Owner may reclaim his or her impounded dog on proof of ownership and upon payment of all applicable fines, fees, and other charges outlined in this Bylaw:
(1) Payment may include impoundment and prosecution costs associated with applications under section 49 of the Community Charter if a dog has been determined in Court to be a dangerous dog."

Amendment #6
Definition
Unlicensed dog means any dog for which the license fee for the current year has not been paid.

Amendment to the main motion:

STACK/FINDLATER
THAT the number of dogs allowed be limited to two, amending the following sections of the bylaw;

Hobby Kennel means a house or property where 3 to 20 dogs over the age of 3 months are kept pursuant to a Kennel Operation Permit.

Maximum Number of Dogs
14. No person shall keep, harbour, or have in possession more than 2 dogs over the age of 3 months in a House or Dwelling Unit within the Regional District, except as provided for persons operating a Hobby Kennel, Service Kennel, veterinary clinic, or other dog service business not providing overnight care as permitted by this Bylaw and all applicable bylaws.

AND FURTHER THAT staff be directed to further review the proposed 3 dog limit to determine whether the number can be limited to 3 per property and the number of dogs permitted for kennels in the District of West Kelowna and RDCO's zoning bylaw.

Amendment CARRIED (Given/Hanson Opposed)
Main Motion CARRIED

========================

Bylaw Enforcement:

8.2 Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1345, 2014, 1st, 2nd and 3rd reading and Adoption (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

OPHUS/FINDLATER
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1345, 2014 be given first, second and third readings and adopted as amended.

Amendment to Schedule 3 - Keep more than 2 dogs

CARRIED Unanimously

========================

8.3 Regional District of Central Okanagan Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No. 1346, 2014, 1st, 2nd and 3rd reading and Adoption (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

Staff noted that Section 35 - Aggressive Dog and Section 36 - Dangerous Dog are to be removed from the bylaw as adjudication is meant to be for minor regulations.

BASRAN/FIELDING
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No. 1346, 2014 be given first, second and third readings, and adopted as amended.

Amendment to Appendix 2 - Keep more than 2 dogs
- Remove Aggressive Dog - Section 35
- Remove Dangerous Dog - Section 36

CARRIED Unanimously

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Blue Divider Line

Suggestions for RDCO dog control:

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION
1. RDCO needs to communicate with the public on how they would like to see the dog bylaw designed, unlike how RDCO did it, designing the dog bylaw and passing 1st and 2nd reading before people even have a chance to read and respond to the new dog bylaw. RDCO probably wouldn't have needed to pay a dog consultant if they would communicate with the public more and take their suggestions seriously. The more people who help design the dog bylaw, the better.

2. RDCO needs to dump the resource committee and dog consultant, and have a dog advisory committee again so the public can have a place to discuss amendments to the dog bylaw other than just publishing a survey on RDCO's website.

3. RDCO needs to regulate and educate by way of the dog bylaw, not just verbal communication.

4. RDCO needs to enforce the dog bylaw for everyone, and not just educate dog owners without issuing tickets, if RDCO wants to be taken seriously and doesn't want a deficit.

5. RDCO should not be banning businesses from the MyDogMatters program, because they have an opinion



NOISE
1. RDCO needs to attend to barking complaints when a dog is barking, not a day or so later, as is currently done.

2. RDCO should not require neighbors to testify against each other in regards to dog complaints, including barking dog complaints.

3. RDCO should not solicit barking complaints from neighboring properties.

4. RDCO needs to work shift work so that they can attend to barking complaints 24/7.

5. RDCO should permit the RCMP to attend to barking dog complaints if RDCO cannot attend, and RCMP only attend if not busy.

6. RDCO should not expect the RCMP to enforce their entire graveshift job.

7. RDCO should support and enforce the tickets the RCMP do issue.

8. Dogs should not be outside between the hours of 10pm - 7am without being in the accompaniment of its owner.

9. All Dogs should be kept in a sound proof building between the hours of 10pm - 7am when not accompanied by its owner, not just kennel dogs.

10. An individual should be able to complain about a barking dog.

11. Barking statistics should be collected, and they should be collected in detail.



OWNER RESPONSIBILITY
1. No free first impound. RDCO wants dog owners to be responsible and pay their own way, but RDCO itself is encouraging people to be irresponsible on their first offence and everyone else is paying for it?


DANGEROUS DOGS
1. Three professional behaviour assessments should be done on dogs deemed dangerous by one sole dog control officer, instead of only one sole dog control officer deciding if a dog is dangerous or not. Dog control officers do not have the training to assess a dogs behaviour.

2. The words "with or without provocation" should be used in regards to the aggressive and dangerous dog parts of the bylaw.

3. Owners of rehabilitatable aggressive and/or dangerous dogs should be offered conditional orders and ordered to take behaviour training if their dog is rehabilitatable.

4. Owners of dogs deemed dangerous and ordered to be euthanized by a single dog control officer who do not want to submit to their dog being euthanized, are required to pay for all three professional behavioural assessments, if their dog is deemed too dangerous to rehabilitate. If the dog is rehabilitative, RDCO pays for the behavioural assessments.

5. RDCO needs to pay all court costs if someone wins a dangerous dog case against a sole dog control officer or otherwise.



FOSTER DOGS
1. People should be allowed one extra dog as a foster.



LEASHES
1. Any part of the bylaw that will not, or cannot be enforced, should be removed from the bylaw. For example: the retractable leash law; notifying RDCO that their dog is no longer owned; or notifying RDCO that their dog died.

2. The new dog bylaw should say "The Animal Control Officer will retain all dogs impounded for a MAXIMUM of 72 hours", instead of MINIMUM as it does now.

3. Zero tolerance for dogs off leash in leash only areas, just as it is for licensing

4. $300 fine for dogs off leash, just like it is with licensing.

5. Have a fine for careless use of a leash instead of banning retractable leashes, just like they have for firearms... careless use of a firearm, they don't ban firearms.



LICENSING
1. Lower the dog license fee to $10-$15 instead of $20, and let people pay for as many years as they want.

2. Provide as many dog licenses for a single dog, as the dog owner needs and wants for all his/her dogs equipment. For people who want more than one dog license for a single dog, RDCO could give out blank dog license tags and let people take the blank tag and a piece of paper with RDCO's tag info on it, to a pet store to have their licenses engraved with RDCO's info and the dog owners phone number or let them purchase their tag and engraving at the pet store after paying RDCO for the license This would reduce the man hours it takes to impound and return dogs. Dogs would not be sitting in the pound overnight while their owners search frantically for their dogs if a neighbor turned the dog into the pound. RDCO would have more time to attend to barking complaints and answering the phone taking complaints.



FINANCE
1. RDCO needs to stop hiring the dog consultant for thousands of dollars and take public comment seriously.

2. RDCO needs to have dog owners phone numbers on the dog license, to help reduce RDCO's workload impounding dogs, which in turn would give RDCO more resources to answer the phone and attend to barking complaints.



POLICY
1. A policy should be made up for dog control officers to follow, especially for dangerous and aggressive dogs.



OFFICER TRAINING
1. Dog control officers should have more training than they do in regards to dog behaviour and people behaviour.



NUISANCE DOGS
1. Any disputed tickets are to be proven, before declaring a dog a nuisance on the third offence.



TOO MANY DOGS
1. The fine for keeping more than 3 dogs should be $25 PER DAY instead of a one time fine of $100. What good is the dog bylaw in regards to the number of dogs you can have, if people can continually circumvent it, pay a $100 fine and keep their 9 dogs?

2. If the dog owner does not remove the excess number of dogs within 15 days, RDCO has the right to seize the excess number of dogs on the 16th day.



EUTHANIZATION
1. RDCO shall not euthanize healthy dogs submitted to RDCO by owners for euthanization, unless the dog is ill or in pain and can't be rehabilitated. Some rescues take in dogs who can be rehabilitated.

2. RDCO shall not euthanize any healthy unclaimed impounded dogs unless they are ill or in pain and can't be rehabilitated, including any of the dogs some Regional Districts and Citys have deemed dangerous without the dog having done anything.



VET BILLS FOR DOGS IN FIGHTS
1. Vet bills should automatically be charged to the violator who has accepted responsibility for the bill, or has been found guilty by an adjudicator, if there is a dispute or not, and RDCO should collect the fees and turn over the payment to the vet or dog owner because dog owners may have trouble collecting.



TICKETING
1. RDCO needs to enact the new ticket information and utilization bylaw that tickets offenders, to go along with the new dog bylaw. How can RDCO ticket anyone without a ticket information bylaw to go with the new bylaw? Shouldn't the dog bylaw and ticket information bylaw that goes with it, both be passed at the same time? Here is a link to .pdf icon Dec 9, 2013 ticket information bylaw (RDCO Board Agenda)

Blue Divider Line

End of the leash for dog bylaw
Castanet.net - by Contributed - Story: 109097 - Feb 17, 2014

RE: Not hiding behind dog bylaw

Mr. Smith, with all due respect, your last line is reminiscent of, “If you aren’t doing anything illegal, what have you to fear?”

And the answer to that is “unelected bureaucrats changing the laws to make what I now legally can do, illegal in the future”. That’s what I fear!

Bill Grigg

Blue Divider Line

RDCO: Not hiding behind dog bylaw
Castanet.net - by Contributed - Story: 109062 - Feb 16, 2014

The Regional District would like to set the record straight about the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw to remove any assumptions, misunderstandings or speculation.

In order to provide factual information and keep all residents informed, we’ve addressed each of the nine points raised by Ms. Stiewe’s letter. View it in detail at http://www.regionaldistrict.com/whats-new.aspx.

We encourage you to read the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw along with the Information Open House panels to understand what’s proposed and why (www.regionaldistrict.com/dogs).

Both the existing and Responsible Dog Ownership bylaws set out the regulations that responsible dog owners are expected to follow to first, ensure public safety and second, set the stage for all citizens to enjoy our quality of life.

Any responsible dog owner that licenses their pet; leashes it and keeps it under their care and control at all times and picks up after their dog and doesn’t let their dog become a threat or nuisance should not have any problem with the bylaw.

Sincerely,
Bruce Smith
RDCO Communications Officer

Blue Divider Line

In reply to RDCO's reply about the New Dog Bylaw on its website called Setting the Record Straight: The Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw under RDCO's "Whats New" web page.

1. Retractable leash length of 6 feet is unacceptable to me because my dog needs exercise. He wants to chase wildlife, and he jumps and climbs fences so a fence won't work, plus I use a long 15 foot training leash. Anyone can get tangled in any length of leash.

2. RDCO has been known to enforce their dog bylaw without a warrant according to "The Not So Dangerous Dogs of British Columbia" facebook page and people we have talked to. RDCO also let the guy in my subdivision keep his 9 dogs when he doesn't qualify for a kennel permit.

3. RDCO said you still need to pay RDCO's legal costs if you win a Dangerous dog case.

4. You are still required to report bylaw infractions and unlicensed dogs, even if you are not fined.

5. You are still required to advise RDCO if your dog has died or been transferred to a new owner, even if RDCO cannot fine you.

6. RDCO said your dog cannot be deemed aggressive or dangerous because someone says your dog causes them emotional trauma. We all know how RDCO investigates. For instance in the case of Shadow, the verdict was the lady's own dog bit her and Shadow was not euthanized!! Most people don't have $50,000 to take a dangerous dog case to court, so one single dog control officer can deem your dog dangerous, and then you have to submit to RDCO to have your dog euthanized if you don't have the money. I believe that three behaviour assessments should be done.

7. In regards to the definition of aggression, what does "attempted to attack" really mean... does it mean the dog barked and lunged on leash? I want to see a badly needed policy for dog control officers.

8. There is no reason why every dog has to be deemed aggressive or dangerous for life. Dogs can be rehabilitated with training. In the case of Tali, a conditional order was drawn up and Tali went to training. Tali is no longer required to wear a muzzle. Also I don't see why an aggressive dog is required to be in an enclosure when outside if it has a muzzle on.

Additions:

A. RDCO has stated that the RCMP can attend to barking dogs at night when RDCO is not working. The Armstrong RCMP who work the North Westside Road area, told me that they can't ticket anyone, because RDCO can't or won't enforce the ticket. Please contact Sgt Rob Daly of the Armstrong RCMP 250-546-3028 to verify all that I am saying.

B. And did you know that RDCO has to canvass your neighborhood to be able to ticket a barking dog, because you alone are not believable by the adjudicator?

C. How can you stay anonymous going to court? RDCO is causing neighbor relation problems telling you that you have to see the dog barking so that you can identify the dog and can take the dog owner to court. The RCMP tell me it is a criminal offence to beset property and I am not to go out for a walk on the road to try and see which dog is barking behind trees or in the dark. Please verify with Sgt Daly. I believe that RDCO should be catching barking dogs and taking dog owners to court instead of you and all your neighbors. RDCO also needs to stop telling people to take photos of barking dogs.

North Westsider

Blue Divider Line

Setting the Record Straight: The Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw

The Regional District would like to set the record straight about the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw, as some people are making assumptions without having the facts or an understanding the current bylaw.

All the information is available for you to view at www.regionaldistrict.com/dogs. We encourage you to read both bylaws (the current Bylaw No. 366 and the new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw) along with the Information Open House panels to truly understand what’s being done. Anyone with questions should speak with our staff directly, rather than rely on possibly erroneous interpretations and hearsay.

We continue to maintain that any dog owner that licenses their pet; leashes it and keeps it under their care and control at all times and picks up after their dog and doesn’t let their dog become a threat or nuisance should not have any problem with the bylaw. This is the case with the existing bylaw and the new one.

To clarify the points made on various Facebook pages and others:

1) No more retractable leashes or any leash exceeding 2 meters regardless of the size of your dog

Retractable leashes can still be sold and probably will and most varieties allow you to lock the length. The new bylaw restricts the maximum length to two meters in order to ensure your dog is under your control in all circumstances. This is about education.

2) RDCO has the right to enter your home without notice or warrant

RDCO doesn’t have the right to enter your home without a warrant. In fact, that’s not even a part of the bylaw. Under the Local Government Act as a peace officer, any bylaw enforcement officer can enter your property at a reasonable time to ensure compliance with the bylaw. This authority already exists and by writing it into the bylaw we are making it publically clear that this is the case so everyone knows.

3) RDCO can charge you with all their impoundment and prosecution costs even if you’re found innocent

This is not true. This part of the bylaw (Section 60) only deals with applications under Section 49 of the Community Charter regarding dangerous dogs.

4) You can be fined for not reporting your friend’s unlicensed dog or any Bylaw infraction

There’s nothing in the bylaw that would indicate anyone could be fined for not reporting an unlicensed dog or bylaw infraction.

5) You can be fined for not telling RDCO your dog has died or been given away to a new owner

This is untrue. You cannot be fined for not telling the RDCO that your dog has died or been transferred to a new owner. We encourage dog owners to let us know if their licensed dog has passed on in order to update our licensing information so as not to send them a renewal notice. Dog owners who transfer their licensed dog to a new owner should also let us know so that we have the correct information for future licensing and in the event that we need to return their dog to them should it be turned into the pound. Again, you can’t be fined for these.

6) Your dog can be deemed aggressive or dangerous if someone says your dog caused them “emotional trauma” without any medical evidence of same

Your dog cannot be deemed aggressive or dangerous simply because someone says your dog causes them emotional trauma. An animal control officer may deem a dog aggressive or dangerous after an incident and investigation.

7) Your dog can be deemed aggressive or dangerous if your dog defended itself in an attack from another dog

As in the current bylaw, each incident requires investigation and each circumstance is different.

8) An aggressive or dangerous dog is now deemed so for life

Both the existing and new bylaws are made to ensure public safety. At the present time, a dangerous dog is so deemed for its life and must be leashed and muzzled in public off its property. The new bylaw doesn’t change this. An aggressive dog designation under the new bylaw would also remain with the dog for its life. The only difference with an aggressive dog is that outside of its owners home on its property, it must be kept in an enclosure. Just as with any other dog, in public it must be leashed. The owners of aggressive and dangerous dogs have a higher level of responsibility to ensure public safety.

9) You are now considered the owner of any dog(s), simply by holding its leash and can be fined for any infraction of the Bylaw as its owner

As with the current bylaw, when you are in custody and care of the dog, you are responsible at all times for that dog. Again, nothing has changed.

The Regional District again encourages all citizens, dog owners and those that don't own dogs, to review current Dog Impounding and Regulation Bylaw No. 366 and the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw for their own information.

(February 12, 2014)

Source: RDCO Whats New

Blue Divider Line

Paws and read planned dog bylaws
Castanet..net - by Contributed - Story: 108795 - Feb 12, 2014

The Regional District Dog Control presented a biased presentation of their proposed Bylaw which had already passed TWO readings without public input.

They say that an open house – in the dead of winter – for only 4 hours, depicting beautiful animals (some of which they have held in confinement for over 2 years!) is sufficient. Their survey is said to allow public input with questions primarily related to fee changes. Did you know about the REAL changes this Bylaw entails?? Here is what you need to know about your NEW Bylaw!
• No more retractable leashes or any leash exceeding 2 metres regardless of the size of your dog
• RDCO has the right to enter your home without notice or warrant
• RDCO can charge you with all their impoundment and prosecution costs even if you’re found innocent
• You can be fined for not reporting your friend’s unlicensed dog or any Bylaw infraction
• You can be fined for not telling RDCO your dog has died, you have moved, or your dog has been given to a new owner
• Your dog can be deemed aggressive or dangerous if someone says your dog caused them “emotional trauma” without any medical evidence of same
• Your dog can be deemed aggressive or dangerous if your dog defended itself in an attack from another dog
• An aggressive or dangerous dog is now deemed so for life
• You are now considered the owner of any dog(s), simply by holding its leash and can be fined for any infraction of the Bylaw as its owner

These are the things Dog Control DOES NOT want to explain to the public.

Karen Stiewe

=================================================

REASONS FOR THE REVISIONS TO THE PROPOSED DOG BY LAW

PART 2 - DEFINITIONS.

1. AGGRESSIVE DOG AND DANGEROUS DOG. The words “WITHOUT PROVOCATION” should be added to both the aggressive dog and the dangerous dog definition. This is to avoid any dog being seized for simply protecting itself from mistreatment or physical abuse. There also must be a “thorough investigation of any incident or complaint.” There are checklists used in other jurisdictions across Canada that should be easily obtained and are effective in upholding public safety and protecting the dog and the dog guardian from unreasonable seizure.

2. INJURY. The definition must include the qualification “as documented and treated by an independent medical professional/physician”. This will put any decision of medical or emotional trauma/injury in the hands of a professional qualified to make those decisions.

3. HOBBY KENNEL. The number of dogs should be between 4 and 12. It was felt that more than twelve could no longer be considered a “hobby”.

4. LEASH. The dictionary definition of a leash is not based on length. There are many training examples where a longer leash is appropriate. If an owner is trying to retrain/rehabilitate a dog then a long leash would be necessary. The requirement of a six foot maximum leash length is counterproductive to the purported goal of developing responsible dog owners.

5. NUISANCE DOG. The simple use of the issuance of a ticket to punish is irrelevant and is a presumption of guilt before innocence - contrary to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The owner must have been convicted of an offence for any action or designation to be instituted. The words ‘without provocation’ should be added to protect a dog from reacting to being taunted, poked with sticks or otherwise unfairly stimulated to react.

6. OWNER. This should be the person or persons who legally own the dog. The proposed definition would include any person who is temporarily is charge of the dog but not the owner including vets, dog walkers, kennels, day cares, neighbors and anyone simply holding the leash. This is not a fair or reasonable definition. Alberta uses the definition of owner as follows: “The occupier of a house or premises where a dog was kept or permitted to live or remain at the time of a complaint shall be presumed to be the owner of the dog unless the occupier proves that the occupier was not the owner of the dog at the time.” This would of course only apply to an unlicensed dog, as the information on file at the pound would establish the identity of the owner of a licensed dog.

PART 3 - RIGHT OF INSPECTION

7. A warrant should be needed to enter any premises based on reasonable cause. This is a right protected under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

8. Most, if not all, people do not take their dog’s licensing information with them anywhere. They may not even have their own I.D. with them if they are close to home. There should be a time allowance of 24 hours for that information to be located and presented. It is also worthy of note that the dog’s info would be available to the officer on their own computer system.

9. This wording would again guarantee that any decisions would be based on the best available information and the opinion of a qualified dog behaviorist.

PART 4 – LICENSING OF DOGS

12. The feeling of the group was that if an owner wishes to remove the dog’s collar while at home that would be quite reasonable. This proposed clause would make that illegal. There should also be exemptions for businesses such as dog day cares, grooming salons, veterinary services, SPCA dog walking services and similar businesses which may use their own ID tags and leashing systems. The fact that licensing information is available on the RDCO computer system and that an owner should be allowed 24 hours to produce such information should be enough to ensure public safety and at the same time give some flexibility to those who care for dogs as a business. See also the suggested definition for ‘owner’ in #6.

18. Demanding that a dog owner notify dog control regarding any change of ownership or the death of a dog is a complete abuse of authority. The RDCO has no reason to require this information and therefore this clause should be struck entirely.


PART 5 – CONTROL OF DOGS.

There should be reasonable grounds for any request made by a dog officer, including fencing. The time period should be 90 days to allow for holidays, weather, availability of contractors/fencing, and ability of the owner to arrange financing.


TETHERING SYSTEMS.

23. The stipulation should simply read “yard” Backyard is too limiting and in fact, depending on the configuration of a property, there may not even be a back yard.


PART 6- DOGS IN PUBLIC PLACES.

29. It was felt by the committee that it should be possible for any dog guardian to tether their dog to an appropriate object for a purpose such as getting a coffee for the owner or a treat for the dog. The time factor would preclude an extended shopping or other excursion.

PART 7 – DOG CARE.

29. The wording should indicate that these actions do disturb the neighborhood. This is more specific and therefore fairer to all parties.

30. There should be an additional clause (perhaps here), which should read as follows. The designation of aggressive dog should expire after a period of two years (24 months) if during that time there have been no bylaw violation convictions or at the times that a qualified/certified dog trainer/behaviorist certifies that the dog has been rehabilitated.
The designation of dangerous dog should expire after a period of three years (36 months) if during that time there have been no bylaw violation convictions or at the time that a qualified/certified dog trainer/behaviorist certifies that the dog has been rehabilitated.

The above will help to promote responsible dog ownership and stimulate actions for an owner to rehabilitate any dog which has been so designated. It will also give both the dog and the owner a chance for positive results for the efforts they have made.

PROHIBITED AREAS.

37. The elimination of the word “parks” as a forbidden area makes sense when one considers that there is no restriction on public sidewalks. The behavioral modification of a dog is a desirable goal and so there must be areas where that can be accomplished.

DANGEROUS DOGS.

There are already higher fees and penalties for this designation. The dog already has a license tag so there is no need for the additional cost to the owner of a microchip.

ADDITIONAL PERMIT REQUIREMENTS.

The owner of a kennel should have the flexibility to walk dogs whenever it is possible. This clause precludes that ability. There are already noise by-laws in place. There would seem to be no logical reason for the restriction.



PART 11 – IMPOUNDMENT.

ESTABLISHMENT OF A POUND.

50. If a dog is impounded the care must encompass the same care that a loving and responsible owner would provide. These include medical care and exercise as well as shelter, food and water. This simply is responsible and demonstrates the proper caring attitude that should be given to any sentient being.

SEIZURE AND IMPOUNDMENT.

52. There are many reasons a dog may be impounded. It is a reasonable expectation that any owner should be allowed to be reunited with their loved one as soon as possible. The 72 hour minimum would seem to be an infliction of an unfair and unnecessary cost to a responsible owner.

59. Humanely is the terminology used in Provincial laws. Note that the owner definition used must be the actual legal owner – not anyone else.

PART 12- RECLAMATION, ADOPTION OR HUMANE EUTHANIZATION.

60. The current law does not allow for the recovery of impoundment or prosecutorial costs for actions initiated under CC 49. This clause is not only illegal but is extremely unfair and punitive as it would force an owner to pay for all the RDCO costs even if there was a Not Guilty verdict.

61. It was felt by the committee that there should be some allowance for one who did not have the financial resources to immediately pay the costs and therefore this clause was unduly punitive and should be amended.

62. Same reasons as Part 5 # 22

63. Titre tests are recognized by Veterinary associations and should be included here as they are elsewhere is this proposal.

64. See above regarding titre tests.


PART 13 – PENALTIES.

This clause is unreasonable because it would allow any person to be ticketed and/or charged simply for failing to report a violation. They may not even be aware that a violation had occurred or simply chosen to not become involved. This clause also seems to demand that a citizen must act to physically stop any supposed violation of this by-law regardless of any consideration of their physical ability or well being. There are agencies such as the RCMP who are designated to handle these types of situations. This clause embodies a completely unreasonable expectation and should be amended as indicated.

SCHEDULE C – STANDARDS FOR ENCLOSURES, FENCES AND PENS.

4. This is unreasonable when it is considered with respect to acreage. There would appear to be no valid reason for this demand. Also see #23.


Respectfully submitted by Cathy Nesbitt on behalf of a committee of concerned citizens.

Blue Divider Line

Dog lovers fight proposed bylaws
Castanet.net - by Jennifer Zielinski - Story: 108366 - Feb 3, 2014

A group of dog owners are taking the Regional District of Central Okanagan's newly proposed dog bylaw to task.

Several area residents met on Saturday to discuss the bylaw and draw up 'improvements' they felt would be more 'dog and dog owner friendly', while still keeping to the goals of the RDCO and dog control.

The group refers to themselves as the 'Concerned Citizens of the RDCO', and believes there are some unreasonable clauses in the bylaw.

The RDCO allowed those with concerns or comments to respond through an online forum to the new laws by Sunday Feb. 2.

Cathy Nesbitt, heads up the group and was the one responsible for sending in a letter to the RDCO which stated; "The 'Concerned Citizens' feel that an 'open house' with Dog Control staff is an inappropriate platform to address issues of concern as many concerns stem from a lack of trust of the staff themselves."

On Wednesday Jan.29, the RDCO held an open house where several district staff members were on hand to answer all the communities' questions about the new bylaw. RDCO Communications Officer Bruce Smith says the open house was well publicized, and approximately 35 people took the opportunity to attend.

Nesbitt who is also a local dog trainer says she joined the group because of her concerns over the definition of a leash by the RDCO.

"I can understand where they are coming from but I don't think you should be able to dictate whether people can buy flexible leashes or not. I think 'flexie' leashes are used a lot by seniors to take their little shitzus out."

The definition of a leash under the responsible dog bylaw is: a leash with a fixed total length of 2 meters or less.

During the open house, Smith told Castanet that all extendable leashes can be locked at the appropriate length. He says far too often they hear stories of people get tripped or tied up in the long extendable leashes.

There are several other definitions the group believes should be improved under section 2 of the bylaw.

The group believes the words 'without provocation' should be added to the definition of both aggressive and dangerous dogs. Currently the definition describes an aggressive dog as one which has attacked, bitten or caused injury to a person or animal, while a dangerous dog, by definition, has seriously injured of killed a person or domestic animal.

Other definitions the group wishes to have revised include hobby kennel, nuisance dog, and owner.

In Part 3- Right of Inspection- the bylaw states 'an Animal Control Officer may enter at all reasonable times upon any property in order to inspect and determine whether this Bylaw is being followed.'

The group of 'Concerned Citizens' believes a warrant should be obtained to enter premises based on reasonable cause.

Smith responded at the open house by saying the RDCO has always had the right under city bylaws to check out premises, however, a complaint must be made before bylaw officers would investigate.

“We are, under the local government act and community charter, given the power to, in reasonable circumstances, go on property. We wouldn’t necessarily be going on a property looking for poop and we wouldn’t necessarily be going at two o’clock in the morning and be looking as to whether you have a dog license or not in your house, but if we get a complaint from someone, we will look into it.”

Part 3 also states that 'upon request an Animal Control Officer, an Owner in contravention of any provision of this Bylaw shall stop and immediately provide the Animal Control Officer with photo identification showing his or her full name and current address, and the licensing information of the dog.'

The group takes a strong issue with this clause claiming 'most, if not all, people do not take their dog’s licensing information with them anywhere'.

According to Nesbitt, dog walkers may not even have their own I.D. with them if they are close to home.

"There should be a time allowance of 24 hours for that information to be located and presented. It is also worthy of note that the dog’s info would be available to the officer on their own computer system," she says.

To which Smith responded, "This is nothing new. We are just making it clear that this authority already exists for any bylaw enforcement officer, including animal control. As pointed out, a dog is required to wear its license on its collar now and in the new bylaw."

Nesbitt and her concern citizen's group also say the RDCO's demand that a dog owner notify dog control regarding any change of ownership or the death of a dog is what they believe to be 'a complete abuse of authority'.

Smith explains that the current bylaw already requires licensed dog owners to notify the regional district if the dog dies or is transferred to a new owner.

"This requirement helps ensure the most recent information is available should the dog need to be reunited with its owner. When owners don’t let us know, it delays the return of the dog."

A response to the 'Concerned Citzens of the RDCO' as well as to the 900 other inquires submitted regarding the new bylaw will be reviewed by staff and considered in preparing a report to the Regional Board.

A staff report is expected for the February 24th evening meeting of the Regional Board, when the bylaw will be coming forward for final reading.

The bylaw was drafted by RDCO Corporate Services staff, not the Dog Service Resource Group as some residents may have assumed.

"It took a good portion of last year for staff to review other bylaws and prepare several drafts that were reviewed many times by staff. The group did review the bylaw and provided input during the fall. Of course it has been thoroughly reviewed by the RDCO legal counsel," says Smith.

The Dog Service Resource Group Terms of Reference was drafted by the RDCO Dog Service Review consultant, Alan Neilson, last summer as one of the recommendations of his Dog Service Review from the fall of 2012.

Based on the terms of reference, people were invited by the RDCO to be on the group which advises staff on dog issues, not just the bylaw.

"No one had to apply to be on the group," says Smith.

The entire suggested revisions to the proposed bylaw can be found below, (unedited).

Blue Divider Line

ABOUT THE NEW PROPOSED DOG BYLAW

Doggytopia, Daycare and natural food store for dogs said this below on facebook:

RDCO Bylaw plain and simple, are you OK with these new dog bylaws:

1) No more retractable leashes or any leash exceeding 2 meters regardless of the size of your dog
2) RDCO has the right to enter your home without notice or warrant
3) RDCO can charge you with all their impoundment and prosecution costs even if you’re found innocent
4) You can be fined for not reporting your friend’s unlicensed dog or any Bylaw infraction
5) You can be fined for not telling RDCO your dog has died or been given away to a new owner
6) Your dog can be deemed aggressive or dangerous if someone says your dog caused them “emotional trauma” without any medical evidence of same
7) Your dog can be deemed aggressive or dangerous if your dog defended itself in an attack from another dog
8) An aggressive or dangerous dog is now deemed so for life
9) You are now considered the owner of any dog(s), simply by holding its leash and can be fined for any infraction of the Bylaw as its owner

The new definition in the bylaw of owner: 'Owner means a person owning; or harboring, or having custody, care and control of a dog, or being in possession of a dog'. So if you are as much as holding a dogs leash, by this new bylaw you own that dog and can be fined or held responsible for anything that dog does. I suggest everyone read the new bylaw very carefully, all 9 points above are correct.

==================================

These are documents about the new dog bylaw

Report to increase fine for unlicensed dogs

Ticket Information and Utilization bylaw

Bylaw to increase fine amounts for more than one offence

RDCO's new proposed dog bylaw

=====================================


About being a delegate
http://www.regionaldistrict.com/media/28266/DelegationPresentationPolicy.pdf

http://www.regionaldistrict.com/regional-board-committees/committees/delegation.aspx

Link to RDCO Board Members Email Addresses

Chief Administrative Officer Brian Reardons email is brian.reardon "at" cord.bc.ca

=====================================

Better to speak up before Feb 24, 2014 when we believe the RDCO Board will probably be passing this new dog bylaw.

Blue Divider Line

Letter: Dog bylaw powers go beyond what’s sensible
Kelowna Capital News - Jan 28, 2014

To the editor:

There are some clauses in the proposed bylaw that should be of great concern to all citizens—not just dog guardians. Please note these are changes Regional District of the Central Okanagan has not publicized.

1. Right of inspection—a dog officer can enter any premises at any reasonable time to determine if the bylaw is being obeyed. Any person in violation of any part of this bylaw will have to immediately provide owner’s photo ID and dog licensing information, and are subject to a minimum $50 fine.

2. Upon death of, or sale, or transfer of any dog to a new owner, a dog officer must be notified. See #1

3. All owners must clean up excrement in their own yard in a timely manner. See #1.

4. Leashes must now be six foot maximum. See #1

5. Any dog can be declared a nuisance dog if three tickets are issued within 12 months. The tickets do not have to be proven—just issued.

6. Emotional trauma can now be a reason to seize any dog.

It has been shown in court that there was little to no training of dog officers, RCMP investigation findings were ignored, no investigation was done on complaints, and a reward system was in place. Now dog officers are being given power equal to a psychiatrist? This is outrageous, completely irresponsible and even dangerous.

7. Any dog can be seized for biting. No allowance is given for provocation.

Let us take two examples. First: Your dog is being attacked by another dog. Your dog avoids the attack and then defends itself. In the process your dog bites the other dog. Second: Your dog is being kicked and beaten with a two by four. Your dog defends itself by biting. Under this proposed bylaw, and the current provincial law, there is no consideration given to the circumstances. Your dog is seized simply for biting. This is unfair and irresponsible.

8. Any dog seized for any reason will be held for a minimum of 72 hours, at the owner’s expense.

There is no mention of medical aid—just food, water and shelter, (in a cage).

There are more items of concern so please read the bylaw entirely.

The RDCO says they are trying to promote responsible ownership. Why then are there no provisions or rewards for an owner who takes steps to remedy any problems with their dog or themselves? There must be some incentives and time limits to any designation to reward a dog guardian’s efforts to improve.

It is long overdue that the public must demand the same responsibility from the RDCO that they are demanding from the public. This is a poorly written, unfair and irresponsible bylaw that should be completely rewritten. Unfortunately the RDCO has not indicated that there will be any changes to this proposed bylaw. This, in itself, is completely irresponsible and must not be allowed to happen.

The open house is Jan. 29 and an online questionnaire is at regionaldistrict.com/dogs. The RDCO phone number is 250-763-4918. Make your opinion known and heard.

Dave Smith,
Kelowna

Blue Divider Line

RDCO still does not have a policy in regards to dog control

click page for larger print

 

RDCO does not have any barking complaint stats either

click page for larger print

These are the stats RDCO says is online, which RDCO sent me a copy of with this foi request, but there are no barking stats?
RDCO is tracking how many FOI requests I make, but they can't track how many barking dog complaints they get?  RDCO even counts how many News Releases Bruce Smith sent out last year, but they can't count how many barking dog complaints they get?

Blue Divider Line

Letter Sent to RDCO about LEASH LENGTH in the new dog bylaw

To RDCO Board and CAO Brian Reardon:

I went back to re-listen to the board audio of Jan 16, 2014. In that audio Rhoda Mueller said that dog leashes of 2 meter maximum only apply to dangerous and aggressive dogs, but that is not what the bylaw reads and that is not what I understood reading the new dog bylaw. I thought that this new dog bylaw was also so that people can understand it better. I think the new dog bylaw needs to be more clear about leash length, so that people understand that the 2 meter leash is only for dangerous and aggressive dogs. To me I was reading that the 2 meter leash length applied to all dogs.

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files Audio of Rhoda talking about 2 meter leash length at the Jan 16, 2014 Board Meeting

=================================================

New Dog Bylaw

Some of the major changes to the proposed bylaw are:
The length of a leash is set at 2 meter maximum so as to ensure an owner has the ability to control their dog while on leash.


PART 2 - DEFINITIONS
6. In this Bylaw:
Leash means a leash with a fixed total length of 2 meters or less.
At Large means any dog on a highway or public place or on private property other than the Owner's property and not securely leashed and under the control of the Owner.

Leashed Parks
27. No Owner will cause or permit his or her dog to be within a park designated as 'leashed,' unless the dog is kept on a secure leash held by the Owner.

Designated Off-leash Parks and Areas
28. An Owner may cause or permit his or her dog to be At Large in a designated off-leash park or area provided that the Owner complies with the following requirements:
b) The Owner has in his or her possession a leash to control the dog;

Aggressive Dogs
38. When an Aggressive Dog is outside its Owner's House or Dwelling Unit and not kept within a closed vehicle, the Owner shall:
(1) keep the Aggressive Dog controlled on a leash securely held; or

Dangerous Dogs
39. When a Dangerous Dog is outside its Owner's House or Dwelling Unit and not kept within a closed vehicle, the Owner shall:
(1) keep the Dangerous Dog controlled on a leash securely held and a muzzle tightly fastened; or

Sincerely,
Westsider

Blue Divider Line

Tail end of time for dog bylaw comments
Castanet.net - by Carmen Weld - Story: 107927 - Jan 31, 2014

Dog owners, dog lovers, and those who find dogs to be a nuisance are invited to have their say on the proposed new dog bylaws for the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

The proposed bylaw document is 18-pages long and in specific detail hopes to clarify the rules, regulations, and penalties for dog owners in our region.

Some are angered about details in the document they call unreasonable, while others are mad about the loosening of some rules, such as how many dogs a person may own.

RDCO Communications Officer Bruce Smith says you have two more days to let the RDCO know everything you love and hate about the new bylaws so they can take it all into consideration before the document is set in stone.

The Regional District also held an open house Wednesday night that was well attended. There were several district staff members on hand to answer all the communities' questions.

“We are trying to model the bylaw around what is expected of responsible dog owners. That they license their pet, they control their dog at all times, they leash their dog when it is not on their property, they look after their dogs medical and health needs, socialization and that they don’t let their dog become a nuisance,” explains RDCO’s Bruce Smith.

Castanet spoke with some vocal dog lovers who have issues with the new bylaw document.

David Smith was feeling frustrated with what he feels are overbearing bylaws such as the 'aggressive dog' definition, as well as a bylaw that seemingly allows officers to come onto your property at any time to check the status of your poop pickup. “Is this for real? The RDCO dictating when an owner has to clean up his or her own dog’s excrement is outrageous.”

David Smith's concerns are something Bruce Smith, of the RDCO, wants to clear up right way.

He says the RDCO has always had the right under city bylaws to do check out such things, however, a complaint must be made before bylaw officers would investigate.

“We are, under the local government act and community charter, given the power to, in reasonable circumstances, go on property,” said Bruce Smith.

Community Charter
[SBC 2003] CHAPTER 26
Current to January 22, 2014

Division 5 — Other Matters

Entry warrants
275 If satisfied by evidence on oath or affirmation that access to property is necessary

(a) for the purposes of this Act or the Local Government Act, or

(b) for the purposes of a municipal power, duty or function under another Act,

a justice may issue a warrant authorizing a person named in the warrant to enter on or into property and conduct an inspection or take other action as authorized by the warrant.

OkanaganLakeBC.ca says, though it would be nice if RDCO actually got the warrant before seizing peoples dogs, like Mary's dogs on facebook.  Mary had 4 dogs and RDCO seized them, then her relatives took two dogs and she got her dogs back.  Mary told us that RDCO wanted to put two of her dogs down believing they were sickly when they were not. Mary told us that RDCO did not have a warrant to seize her dogs.

“We wouldn’t necessarily be going on a property looking for poop,” he said. “and we wouldn’t necessarily be going at two o’clock in the morning and be looking as to whether you have a dog license or not in your house, but if we get a complaint from someone, we will look into it.”

Another hot topic in the new bylaws appears to be the district's decision to increase the number of dogs allowed from two to three without a needing special license.

Bruce Smith says this decision is based on people being responsible dog owners regardless of the amount of dogs they own.

“The thinking is, if they are responsible for one dog, they will be responsible for two dogs, and be responsible for three dogs. We are taking it one at a time and we will see how our board and the public feels about it.”

But certified K9 trainer with Antler K9, Julie Wilson, spoke with Castanet at the open house. She feels that the reality doesn’t support the theory.

“It is all about the group mentality of three dogs and a third dog changes the dynamic,” argues Wilson. “It changes the dogs themselves into a pack mentality, making them more dangerous and hard to control.”

Wilson also feels the new rule regarding the length of leash is pointless. Pointing out that once your dog is more than a few feet away from you, training is far more important than the length of the leash, and that the difference between two metres and five metres doesn’t matter.

Davis Smith also has issue with the leash length bylaw, saying that it will hurt pet owners who already have extendable leashes, and pet stores that sell them.

The RDCO’s Bruce Smith argues that all extendable leashes can be locked at the appropriate length. He says far too often they hear stories of people get tripped or tied up in the long extendable leashes.

“This way people are still able to get out with their dogs, able to socialize and enjoy, but their dog is on a leash and their dog is under their care and control," he explained.

Another open house guest, Joellen Broughton, feels a lot of the new bylaw fines are money grabs, and are far too high for the crime, especially if the person is a first time offender.

She said a dog getting loose at some point is bound to happen to any dog owner, and a fine for a first time slip-up is unreasonable.

But the RDCO says by writing out this document and clarifying the rules everyone will know what they can and cannot do, and bylaws won’t have to be enforced.

(In OkanaganLakeBC.ca's opinion, why have a dog bylaw you are not going to enforce?)

“Ignorance is not any reason or excuse to not follow the law, so we thought in order to make people aware we would put those things in the bylaw so they are aware of what we expect of responsible dog owners,” says Bruce Smith.

“We would hope that as more dog owners care and control their pets at all times, on and off their property, there will be fewer chances of serious conflicts involving dogs, animals and people.”

The entire proposed dog bylaw can be read here.

“We’ve certainly had a lot of interest in the bylaw, because we have had over 500 people fill out the questionnaire so far,” said Bruce Smith on Wednesday.

You can share up until midnight on Sunday how you feel about the good and bad of the proposed document.

The RDCO claims that efforts they’ve made over the past few years to promote the expected behaviours and attitudes of responsible dog ownership is paying off.

During 2013, there were 632 dogs impounded, down from 685 in 2012, continuing a ten-year downward trend.

(In OkanaganLakeBC.ca's opinion there are less dogs impounded because of FACEBOOK sharing lost dog photos, not because of anything RDCO did.  People have called to report a dog at large out North Westside Road area, but RDCO say they can't come out 45 minutes from town to the North Westside Road area because they are too short staffed.  We know of a few instances)

As well, the number of Aggressive and Dangerous Dog complaints continues to fall. In 2011 there were 412 complaints, 392 in 2012, and last year just 350 complaints involving aggressive or dangerous dogs in the Central Okanagan.

 (In OkanaganLakeBC.ca's opinion, all the news coverage of Diesel and Shadow probably helped lower the complaints of dangerous and aggressive dogs.)

The number of dogs humanely euthanized by the Regional District continues its annual decline from a high of 306 in 2003 to 52 last year, which included 27 initiated by individual dog owners.

(In OkanaganLakeBC.ca's opinion, 52 euthanized dogs is still too many euthanized dogs.  Shouldn't a vet be mandated to give an opinion on the health of the animal and only the health of the animal should be considered in a decision to euthanize a dog?  People should not be bringing their dog into RDCO to just euthanize their dog without health consideration reviewed by a vet!!!  You don't euthanize a dog because it bit someone, you take the dog to behaviour training)

Information on Responsible Dog Ownership and the Regional Dog Service can be found anytime at regionaldistrict.com/dogs.

Blue Divider Line

RDCO Dog Bylaw Information Open House on Wednesday, January 29th from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the RDCO 1450 KLO Road office in Kelowna in order to make your feelings and comments known.

Blue Divider Line

.pdf icon January 27, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

The Regional Board has received information and statistics regarding the Dog Control Service activity during 2013. There were 16,908 dogs licensed in the Central Okanagan at the end of 2013, a 24% increase over 2012. In addition, there were 632 dogs impounded during 2013, down from 685 in 2012 and continuing a ten year downward trend. The number of dogs euthanized is also decreasing annually: from a high of 306 in 2003 to 52 last year which includes 27 that were initiated by individual dog owners.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 27, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (24.1 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 Dog Control Statistics 2013 - .wma (765 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.2 Bylaw Officer Appointment - .wma (167 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray asking about dog rescues paying for a licence for a rescue dog and the licence staying with the dog when it is adopted - .wma (2.19 MB)

.pdf icon January 27, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 7.1 Dog Control Statistics 2013

.pdf icon Item 7.2 Bylaw Officer Appointment

*Note* This is only snippets, please click links above for entire content

 

2013 Dog Control Statistics

click for a larger copy

 

Executive Summary:
Debbie Wood has joined our Dog Control department on January 20,2014, as a Dog Control Officer II. Debbie is filling a full time position which was vacated by a retirement. She has previously been employed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer with RDCO Dog Control from 1991 - 1998, and recently, as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer with the City of Williams Lake and Thompson Nicola Regional District.

James Goddard has been employed as a Dog Control Officer I, relief, since October 12,2013. He has been training with full time staff and working to cover absences by staff.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT Debbie Wood be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer and Dog Control Officer for the Dog Control Bylaws and dog related issues of the Parks Bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan;
AND FURTHER THAT James Goddard be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer and Dog Control Officer for the Dog Control Bylaws and dog related issues of the Parks Bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 27, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (24.1 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 Dog Control Statistics 2013 - .wma (765 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.2 Bylaw Officer Appointment - .wma (167 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray asking about dog rescues paying for a licence for a rescue dog and the licence staying with the dog when it is adopted - .wma (2.19 MB)

.pdf icon January 27, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

7. CORPORATE SERVICES

Dog Control Services

7.1 Dog Control Statistics to December 31, 2013 (for information only) (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

It was noted that the statistics show some very positive outcomes with increase in licensing, reduction in impounds and decrease in euthanization. These statistics should be celebrated and staff was encouraged to publicize them.

STACK/GIVEN
THAT the Dog Control Statistics to December 31,2013 be received for information.

CARRIED Unanimously

==========================

Bylaw Enforcement:

7.2 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - Debbie Wood & James Goddard (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

EDGSON/STACK
THAT Debbie Wood be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer and Dog Control Officer for the Dog Control Bylaws and dog related issues of the Parks Bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan;

AND FURTHER THAT James Goddard be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer and Dog Control Officer for the Dog Control Bylaws and dog related issues of the Parks Bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

CARRIED Unanimously

===========================

12. DIRECTOR ITEMS

12.1 Director Gray questioned whether a letter has been received from the Small Dog Rescue Society regarding how they can receive dog licenses.
Staff noted a letter has been received and is being responded to. It was noted the Society has applied for a 2014 regional grant in aid.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 27, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (24.1 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 Dog Control Statistics 2013 - .wma (765 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.2 Bylaw Officer Appointment - .wma (167 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 27, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray asking about dog rescues paying for a licence for a rescue dog and the licence staying with the dog when it is adopted - .wma (2.19 MB)

Blue Divider Line

Letter: New dog bylaw
Kelowna Capital News - Jan 23, 2014

To the editor:

On Jan. 16, 2014, the Central Okanagan Regional District’s communications officer, Bruce Smith, issued a news release about a new bylaw. It is called Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343, and has already passed two readings.

Mr. Smith cites a few of the changes proposed in the bylaw, none of which are likely to raise hackles. However, there are some important changes that he did not site. Among them is the right of an animal control officer to enter any property to inspect and determine whether this bylaw is being followed. The need for a warrant is not mentioned.

The animal control officer may also determine whether a dog is “dangerous” or “aggressive” for the purposes of the bylaw.

What’s not mentioned is that the “dangerous” or “aggressive” determination need not be based on what the dog has done, but rather on a prediction of what a dog may do in the future.

As ignorance of the law is not an excuse, I hope every dog guardian will take the time to read the 18 pages of the proposed bylaw.

The RDCO has even provided an online questionnaire for residents to complete before Feb. 2.

The link to the bylaw is Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343.

For the online questionnaire, just add the word “questionnaire” to the bylaw link.

The online bylaw questionnaire is on a page called Dog Control—What We Do, and is about a third of the page down in green lettering.

By reading the proposed bylaw and answering the questionnaire dog guardians may spare themselves problems with the law and maybe even save their dog’s life.

Helen Schiele,
Kelowna

Source:  http://www.kelownacapnews.com/opinion/letters/241537701.html

 

Group seeks to change Animal Cruelty Legislation
hqcowichanvalley.com - January 20, 2014

Dog ownership laws in Canada have been largely unchanged since 1892.

According to a group trying to change the Animal Cruelty Legislation, in this country there have been numerous attempts to do so by various politicians, but none have been successful.

Tomorrow (Tues), Chris Davis, of Duncan, will be meeting with NDP MP Jean Crowder about the issue and he will bring with him a series of proposed amendments to the law.

The movement stems from an incident that happened back in April when a Duncan area man is alleged to have punched a Boston terrier.

Davis says the terrier had to remain with the man because the law didn't allow for the animal to be removed.

That case is still working its way through the courts.

====================

This is the group with Terry's Law http://www.terryslaw.ca/

Blue Divider Line

Dog bylaw passes first two readings
Castanet.net - by Wayne Moore - Story: 106780 - Jan 17, 2014

Residents have an opportunity to share their thoughts with the district regarding the new RDCO bylaw regulating dog owners within the Central Okanagan.

The Regional Board has given the first two readings to a new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw. Now, interested residents can provide their comments with the goal of adopting the new bylaw in February.

“The name of the bylaw reflects the responsibility of residents that choose to own a dog. More often than not it all begins and ends with the owner. The changes proposed in the bylaw support and encourage the principles of responsible dog ownership," says RDCO Communications Officer, Bruce Smith.

"This helps not only to ensure public safety, but ensure that non-dog owners and dog owners can equally enjoy our community. All dogs in the Central Okanagan must be licensed, are encouraged to be spayed or neutered, and owners must be in control of their dogs at all times, on or off their property. This means leashing and controlling their dog in public and controlling their dog when in designated off-leash areas.”

Smith adds, “Dog owners must not let their dogs run at large and are responsible for being a good neighbour by picking up after their pet and keeping their dog from becoming a nuisance.”

“That’s the main focus of this updated bylaw. Owners that have had a responsible attitude shouldn’t have any problem with this proposal,” says Smith. “The Regional Board has directed that those that choose not to do these things should be held accountable through the bylaw, by other dog owners and citizens across the Central Okanagan.”

The bylaw has been crafted in recognition of the goals and objectives of the Regional Dog Service Review that was adopted by the Regional Board in the fall of 2012.

Regional District staff has reviewed other bylaws from progressive jurisdictions like Calgary, Winnipeg and Kamloops.

Among the changes proposed in the bylaw:
• Licensed dog owners will receive a one-time ‘free’ ticket home without penalty from Dog Control in the event their dog is found at large and reported to the Regional Dog Pound.
• Responsible dog owners will be allowed to own a maximum of three licensed dogs.
• Dogs must not be tethered for longer than four hours a day.
• After adoption of the bylaw owners of dogs newly deemed dangerous will be required to post signs advising a dangerous dog is on the property.
• Higher fines for dog owners that choose not to care and control their dog, choose not to keep their dog from being a nuisance and choose not to pick up after their pet.

“Central Okanagan residents can learn more about the Responsible Dog Ownership bylaw, complete an online questionnaire and attend an Information Open House on Wednesday, January 29th at the RDCO KLO Road office in Kelowna in order to make their feelings and comments known. The questionnaire will be available at regionaldistrict.com/dogs for residents to complete by February 2nd," says Smith.

He adds, “The goal of the bylaw is to encourage, support and reward dog owners that choose to be responsible and good neighbours. With more dog owners doing these things, we look forward to having fewer unfortunate incidents and conflicts involving dogs and a safer and more dog welcoming community.”

Blue Divider Line

Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw Public Review

Residents have an opportunity to share their thoughts about the new RDCO bylaw regulating dog owners within the Central Okanagan.

The Regional Board has given the first two readings to a new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw. Interested residents can provide their comments with the goal of adopting the new bylaw in February.

Communications Officer Bruce Smith says, “The name of the bylaw reflects the responsibility of residents that choose to own a dog. More often than not it all begins and ends with the owner. The changes proposed in the bylaw support and encourage the principles of responsible dog ownership. This helps not only to ensure public safety, but that non-dog owners and dog owners can equally enjoy our community. All dogs in the Central Okanagan must be licensed, are encouraged to be spayed or neutered, and owners must be in control of their dogs at all times, on or off their property. This means leashing and controlling their dog in public and controlling their dog when in designated off-leash areas.”

Smith adds, “Dog owners must not let their dogs run at large and are responsible for being a good neighbour by picking up after their pet and keeping their dog from becoming a nuisance.”

“That’s the main focus of this updated bylaw. Owners that have that responsible attitude shouldn’t have any problem with this proposal,” says Smith. “The Regional Board has directed that those that choose not to do these things should be held accountable through the bylaw, by other dog owners and citizens across the Central Okanagan.”

The bylaw has been crafted in recognition of the goals and objectives of the Regional Dog Service Review that was adopted by the Regional Board in the fall of 2012. Regional District staff has reviewed other bylaws from progressive jurisdictions like Calgary, Winnipeg and Kamloops.

Among the changes proposed in the bylaw:
•Licensed dog owners will receive a one-time ‘free’ ticket home without penalty from Dog Control in the event their dog is found at large and reported to the Regional Dog Pound.
•Responsible dog owners will be allowed to own a maximum of three licensed dogs.
•Dogs must not be tethered for longer than four hours a day.
•After adoption of the bylaw owners of dogs newly deemed dangerous will be required to post signs advising a dangerous dog is on the property.
•Higher fines for dog owners that choose not to care and control their dog, choose not to keep their dog from being a nuisance and choose not to pick up after their pet.

Smith says, “Central Okanagan residents can learn more about the Responsible Dog Ownership bylaw, complete an online questionnaire and attend an Information Open House on Wednesday, January 29th at the RDCO KLO Road office in Kelowna in order to make their feelings and comments known. The questionnaire will be available at regionaldistrict.com/dogs for residents to complete by February 2nd.”

He adds, “The goal of the bylaw is to encourage, support and reward dog owners that choose to be responsible and good neighbours. With more dog owners doing these things, we look forward to having fewer unfortunate incidents and conflicts involving dogs and a safer and more dog welcoming community.”

(January 16, 2014)

Source:  RDCO Whats new

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Dog attacked by off leash pit bulls
Castanet.net - by Jennifer Zielinski - Story: 106686 - Jan 15, 2014

Gentle giant Bella is being hailed as a hero after she put herself in harms way to protect her owner and her daughter, from two off-leash pit bulls who charged the trio in an open field.

Cindy Switzer had taken her daughter and dog for a walk near the former Bellevue Elementary School field, but as they approached the public entrance they were rushed by the two dogs.

"My daughter was on one side and my wife and the dog, who was on leash, were on the other side. From what I understand the pit bulls came up to them and immediately attacked Bella," explains Scott Switzer, of the incident.

Bella was bitten several times by the two pit bulls before their owner, who appeared in his early 20's, was able to break apart the fight.

Cindy rushed Bella to Fairfield Animal Hospital were she spent several hours in surgery, three days in care, and landed the Switzer's with a total veterinary bill of over $1200.

"We were told she had approximately 100 stitches, internal as well as external, there was a lot of muscle tissue damage," says Scott.

The Switzer's called the RCMP who in turn contacted the Regional District of the Central Okanagan Animal Control and are currently investigating the matter.

RDCO Communications Officer Bruce Smith says at this point in the investigation it is hard to say if the two pit bulls will be seized.

"The likely course of action, given no history with any of the dogs and that no humans were physically injured in this (case), is that we could go with a consent order or we would go with tickets and fines," says Smith.

Those fines could total upwards of $1,000, and if a court order is put into place the pit bulls owners may have to consent to the 'Dangerous Dog' Bylaw.




Photo: Contributed

Bella the dog's injuries

The bylaw imposes rules such as ensuring the dogs won't kill or seriously injury anyone, as well as placing the dogs on a short leash when in public or having the owner build an enclosure for the animals.

As the dogs have not been seized by the RDCO, the Switzer's are warning those living near the former Bellevue Elementary School to be extra vigilant when walking their pets as the pit bulls also live in the area.

"These pit bulls have a pretty good track record of escaping yards and pens," says Scott. "If these dogs have done it once then it is going to happen again."

While the finger may be pointed at the breed in this instance, Smith says the RDCO does not have any breed specific regulations and all dogs are treated the same.

The pit bull owner did apologize to Cindy for what happened and according to the Switzer's the young man did seem to be remorseful.

VIDEO on You Tube

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RDCO has stated that Dog Control Officers need to go around to your neighbors, asking if barking is a problem, when you make a barking complaint. If your neighbors don't want to get involved your out of luck and you will be stuck listening to barking dogs like us. Having RDCO go around your neighborhood and you having to go to court to prove the barking, it pits neighbor against neighbor.  Neighbors shouldn't be involved.  It should be RDCO taking the barking dog owner to court, else how do you stay anonymous if you have to go to court to prove the barking?

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 16, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Mueller - RDCO needs to involve your neighbors about the barking - .wma (900 KB)

The other thing is that RDCO insists you see which dog is barking so you can identify it.  My neighbors reported me as a prowler going out driving to the neighbors and parking on the side of the road to make sure which of the two dogs barked for 10 minutes in violation of the dog bylaw.  The RCMP have told me that it is called BESETTING if I do that.

RDCO NEEDS TO CATCH THE DOG BARKING NOT THE COMPLAINANT

Lots of times there are trees in the way, or the dog is behind the house, and you can't see a dog even across the road from you like in my case.

CANADA's CRIMINAL CODE
BESETTING
Section 264.

(1) No person shall, without lawful authority and knowing that another person is harassed or recklessly as to whether the other person is harassed, engage in conduct referred to in subsection (2) that causes that other person reasonably, in all the circumstances, to fear for their safety or the safety of anyone known to them.

(2) The conduct mentioned in subsection (1) consists of

   (a) repeatedly following from place to place the other person or anyone known to them;

   (b) repeatedly communicating with, either directly or indirectly, the other person or anyone known to them;

   (c) besetting or watching the dwelling-house, or place where the other person, or anyone known to them,
        resides, works, carries on business or happens to be; or

   (d) engaging in threatening conduct directed at the other person or any member of their family.

Punishment

(3) Every person who contravenes this section is guilty of

(a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years; or

(b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-46/section-264.html

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.pdf icon January 16, 2014 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw

The Regional Board has given first and second reading to the proposed new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343. The bylaw encourages and supports dog owners that exhibit responsible behaviour in licensing, caring and controlling their dog. The bylaw proposes a number of changes including allowing up to three licensed dogs per house, tethering a dog for no more than four hours a day and increased fines for dogs at large and off leash. An Information Open House will be held on Wednesday, January 29th at the RDCO office, 1450 KLO Road in Kelowna from 4:00 – 8:00 pm and an online survey is available for public comment on the proposed bylaw at regionaldistrict.com/dogs. It’s anticipated that the Regional Board will consider adopting the bylaw in February.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 16, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (10 MB)

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.pdf icon January 16, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 5.2 Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343

*Note* This is only snippets, please click links above for entire content

23. No Owner shall tie, secure, or tether any dog except in the backyard of the Owner's property with a tethering system that allows the dog's adequate freedom of movement with a minimum of 3 meter radius and a minimum of 1.5 meters from any backyard property line.

24. No Owner shall cause or permit his or her dog to be tied, secured, tethered or fastened to a tethering system in excess of 4 consecutive hours in a 24-hour period.

29. No Owner shall cause or permit his or her dog to cry, bark, howl, or yelp continuously for a period of more than 5 minutes or sporadically for a period of more than 15 minutes or in a manner that tends to disturb the peace, quiet, rest, enjoyment, comfort or convenience of persons in the neighbourhood.

Enclosures & Pens
2. Minimum standards for outdoor pens and/or runs for  dogs shall be as follows.
(a) Sizes: Pens - 3' x 5' per dog
              Runs - 4' x 12' per dog
3. An Enclosure means a structure:
a) at least 1.83m (6 ft.) in height, 1.22m (4 ft.) in width, and 2.44m (8 ft.) in length;
b) constructed with secure sides, top and bottom and suitable for the size and strength of the dog to prevent it from escaping;
c) provided with impervious surfacing (for instance, concrete slabs) for the bottom of the enclosure to prevent digging and to facilitate cleaning and sanitizing;
d) locked to prevent entry of young children or other unauthorized persons;
e) provided with shelter suitable for the size of the dog and to provide shade from the sun and to protect it from varying weather conditions; and
f) used for the temporary confinement of a dog for no longer than 12 hours in every 24 hour period.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 16, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (10 MB)

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.pdf icon January 16, 2014 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

Director Stack left the meeting at 9:08 a.m.

5.2 Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343, 1st and 2nd reading (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)
Staff report dated January 7,2014 outlined the new regional dog control bylaw based on responsible dog ownership. Staff and legal counsel have over the past year drafted a new bylaw to encourage, support and reward responsible dog owners. Staff outlined some of the major changes to the bylaw. An online survey and open house will be held to seek feedback from the public before the bylaw comes back to the Board for adoption.

Discussion:
• Dogs owned increase from 2 to 3
• Format and layout easier to reference
• Leash length shortened to 2 meters
• Nuisance dog redefined. Going forward will look at whether license fees should be increased for nuisance dogs.
• Licensed at-large dogs - one-time no impoundment fine.
• New regulation for dogs confined in hot vehicles and dog suffering contagious disease. Staff will work with the SPCA when these issues arise.
• New regulation for tethering dogs - no more than 4 hours.
• Increase in fines, most notably: unlicensed dogs, dogs off-leash, failing to control aggressive and dangerous dogs.
• Owners of dangerous dogs will be required to post signs and microchip their dogs. Consent orders will continue to be used where appropriate.
• The bylaw is a living document.

Discussion:
How will the 2 meter lease be enforced and how can this be communicated to dog owners. It is about education and control of the dog-a shorter leash provides for that. There is no fine, education will be important for owners and businesses who sell the retractable leases. This type of leash can be used but the owner will be required to keep it at the 2 meter length.

Why increase number of dogs? The public has requested it, staff know there are owners who have three dogs (example: an older dog may be at its end of life and the owner wants to bring in a new dog). If owners are responsible there should be no issues--if not responsible the bylaw will deal with those issues.

Feces on a dog owner's property, is this regulation required? It can be a serious neighbourhood issue and is difficult to deal with under the unsightly premise bylaw.

Licensing of dogs - move sections 12, 13, 14, 15 before sections 10 and 11.

Director Stack returned at 9:25 a.m.

Section 66 - illegal release of dog from the pound--remove the word rescue.

3 dogs per property - will it be an issue for properties with more than one house? Discussion on this issue has occurred with the resource committee and legal counsel and it is believed to be manageable.

Will staff be able to meet public expectations regarding barking dog? Staff now looking for additional support in barking dog complaints. A recent case to adjudication has ruled one complaint from one person may not be enough. Every case is individual and requires investigation and education.

Personal assistance dogs - not defined, is a definition needed? Will follow the provincial Guide Dog Act for definitions. Current wording restrictive to sight and hearing impaired and should be reviewed.

STACK/BAKER
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw No. 1343 be given 1st and 2nd reading, and advertised for public review.
Section 66: , remove the word rescue, no person shall release or attempt to release
Revise licensing section - move sections 12, 13, 14, 15 before sections 10 and 11.

CARRIED Unanimously

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio January 16, 2014 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (10 MB)

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Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files January 16, 2014 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Fielding - dog feces and change around some sections in the dog bylaw - .wma (894 KB)

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RDCO's New Proposed Dog Bylaw

January 13, 2014 RDCO has published its new proposed dog bylaw on its website ... have a look and see what you think. This bylaw will have 1st and 2nd reading January 16th, 2014 and then RDCO will permit public comment on it.

Do you like the idea of an owner not having to pay an impound fee the first time a dog is impounded (saving $25) when it probably costs more than $25 to impound a dog? Dog Control Officers make close to $28.00 per hour and are paid double time for overtime.  Should dog owners pay the actual cost of impounding a dog?

======

Below is only a snippet of the new proposed dog bylaw, click link above for entire content.

23. No Owner shall tie, secure, or tether any dog except in the backyard of the Owner's property with a tethering system that allows the dog's adequate freedom of movement with a minimum of 3 meter radius and a minimum of 1.5 meters from any backyard property line.

24. No Owner shall cause or permit his or her dog to be tied, secured, tethered or fastened to a tethering system in excess of 4 consecutive hours in a 24-hour period.

29. No Owner shall cause or permit his or her dog to cry, bark, howl, or yelp continuously for a period of more than 5 minutes or sporadically for a period of more than 15 minutes or in a manner that tends to disturb the peace, quiet, rest, enjoyment, comfort or convenience of persons in the neighbourhood.

Enclosures & Pens
2. Minimum standards for outdoor pens and/or runs for  dogs shall be as follows.
(a) Sizes: Pens - 3' x 5' per dog
              Runs - 4' x 12' per dog
3. An Enclosure means a structure:
a) at least 1.83m (6 ft.) in height, 1.22m (4 ft.) in width, and 2.44m (8 ft.) in length;
b) constructed with secure sides, top and bottom and suitable for the size and strength of the dog to prevent it from escaping;
c) provided with impervious surfacing (for instance, concrete slabs) for the bottom of the enclosure to prevent digging and to facilitate cleaning and sanitizing;
d) locked to prevent entry of young children or other unauthorized persons;
e) provided with shelter suitable for the size of the dog and to provide shade from the sun and to protect it from varying weather conditions; and
f) used for the temporary confinement of a dog for no longer than 12 hours in every 24 hour period.

==============

Lions Bay
20. (c) No chaining or tethering of unattended dogs.

Richmond BC Animal And Bird bylaw 7932, April 8, 2013
1.1 General Prohibition – All Animals and Birds
1.1.1 A person must not cause any animal or bird:
 (a) to be hitched, tied or fastened to a fixed object:
    (i) where a choke collar forms part of the securing apparatus;
    (ii) where the securing apparatus is less than 3 metres in length; or
    (iii) for a period longer than 1 hour in any 6 hour period;

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RDCO does not have to release its draft dog control bylaw.


click for larger copy

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The bylaw adjudication screening officer is unable to prevent the matter from proceeding to arbitration if the disputer wishes for it to do so.


click letter for larger copy

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.pdf icon December 9, 2013 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting

Dog Service Model Implementation Update
The Regional Board has received an update on the implementation of recommendations stemming from the 2012 Dog Service Review. Consultant Allan Neilson says many proactive measures have been taken during 2013 to encourage, support and reward responsible dog ownership. These efforts include launching of the ‘My Dog Matters’ rewards program, licensing of an additional 3,600 dogs through the October Free License Amnesty and introduction of online license purchasing starting January 1st, 2014. Plans for 2014 include consideration of a new Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw and various educational and awareness efforts to support responsible dog owners.

No Dog License Fine Increasing Jan. 1st 2014
The Regional Board has adopted bylaw changes that will see a substantial increase in the fine for the owner of an unlicensed dog. Starting January 1st, any unlicensed dog will be subject to a $300 fine. The current fine is $100. The increased fine brings the Regional District in line with other local governments that are holding dog owners accountable for ensuring they have a valid dog license, which is required in the Dog Impounding and Regulation Bylaw.

2014 – 2018 Financial Plan Considerations
The Regional Board has received a report outlining possible items for consideration during the review of the 2014-2018 Financial Plan. More specifics on the impacts of these items will be provided at the February 27th budget meeting.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio December 9, 2013 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (34.6 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about entire Item 5.1 Dog Control Service Model Implementation Update - .wma (22.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about moving Agenda 7.1 and 7.1b - .wma (317 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 Bylaw Amendments To Approve An Increased Fine For Unlicensed Dogs and only about Item 7.1A Ticket Information And Utilization Amendment Bylaw No 1340 - .wma (4.63 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1B Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No 1341 - .wma (199 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.6 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (97.3 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray - dog waste - .wma (795 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Motion for 5 year plan for dog licensing fees - .wma (211 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Stack - off leash dogs not zero tolerance - .wma (642 KB)

.pdf icon December 9, 2013 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Agenda

.pdf icon Item 5.1 Dog Control Service Model Implementation Update (includes Dog Resource Group Terms of Reference)

.pdf icon Item 7.1 Bylaw Amendments To Approve An Increased Fine For Unlicensed Dogs

.pdf icon Item 7.1A Ticket Information And Utilization Amendment Bylaw No 1340

.pdf icon Item 7.1B Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No 1341

.pdf icon Item 7.6 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment

.pdf icon Item 9.2 2014-2018 Financial Plan Request Items (Bylaw Implementation)

*Note* This is only snippets, please click links above for entire content

The Service Review report spoke about the importance of bylaw enforcement as one part of the new model's dual focus. The report also questioned, however, the expectation on the part of some stakeholders for RDCO to write more tickets, particularly for dogs at large, refusal to clean up after dogs, and dogs in prohibited areas. The report suggested that attempting to deal with these problems by writing more tickets is neither possible given staffing levels nor desirable. The better approach is one that promotes responsible dog ownership, helps owners become responsible dog owners, rewards those who buy into the concept, and penalizes with significant fines those who refuse to accept their duties to the community. Under this approach, the goal with respect to ticketing is fewer tickets with higher fines.

Effective January 1, 2014, the Regional District will be enforcing a zero tolerance approach with owners of unlicensed dogs (see later under enforcement). Owners who are found without a dog license will be required to pay a significant fine. The Dog Service Resource Group has recommended to staff a fine of $500 for no license. Staff understands the Resource Group's perspective - specifically, that a fine of this size would effectively discourage non-compliance. Staff has taken the position, however, that a fine of $300 will be sufficient to achieve greater compliance, is in-line with fines in other places (e.g., Calgary, Winnipeg), and is more acceptable to the community.

Policy of zero tolerance for not having a license has been well publicized and will continue to be. Formal policy to outline all cases of zero tolerance and very low tolerance is being drafted to guide staff in implementation of bylaw.
Zero tolerance on dog aggression will be publicized as well once bylaw released.

That three strikes approach used to treat aggressive dogs as dangerous dogs is problematic. Approach is to be used to
escalate fines for repeated infractions and repeated impoundments.

Introduce new categories of licenses Recommendation discussed with Dog Service Resource Group.
Further work in 2014 required to establish testing program necessary to qualify owners as "responsible".¹ Aim for new licenses to be in place for 2015.
¹ One testing program that is in place now for other purposes is the Canine Good Neighbour Certificate. This program was noted at the August Resource Group meeting.

Two Consent Orders completed in 2011; Eight in 2012 and two in 2013. Three of Orders in 2012 breached, resulting in euthanasia of dogs.

Seek assistance from Crown on test cases have pursued and have been denied by Crown.

Fee for licensed dog's first impoundment is reduced to $0; RDCO will deliver the dog to owner (Ie., first time is "free ride
home,").³

New penalties ranging from $200 to $500 being introduced against owners of dogs that are aggressive towards, and that injure, other animals or humans.

New fines being introduced to penalize owners who tether dogs improperly ($200) leave dogs unattended in public ($100) and leave dogs in enclosed space or vehicle without proper ventilation ($150).

Drafting of formal policies to guide staff and ensure consistency in the levels of tolerance in the enforcement of different regulations

In past years, RDCO used the Dog Advisory Committee as the chief vehicle for engaging stakeholders. For various reasons this Committee lost the support of the Board and the organization, and became viewed an ineffective.

  • establish a Dog Service Resource Group as a sounding board and source of advice for staff
  • host public open houses on the service, and additional open houses to help the public learn about the proposed changes to the existing service model
  • develop a volunteer program and recruit volunteers to:
     - assist with the care of impounded dogs
     - assist with the development and delivery of educational programs
     - work as Dog Ambassadors to engage and help educate dog owners in parks
  • hold annual workshop with dog service providers to understand their concerns, and to support them in their role as de facto ambassadors
  • conduct annual satisfaction surveys of responsible dog owners throughout the service area

First step will be to hire two co-op students in late April to assist in development and implementation of Dog Ambassador
pilot program. Intent of the program is ultimately to move pairs of volunteers (and the students themselves) amongst key
local and regional parks, beaches and off-leash areas to engage dog owners. Volunteers' role will be to:
understand how to be a responsible dog owner understand regulations and rights reward examples of responsible ownership (by distributing small promotional items) provide information to dog owners (e.g., location of dog parks and beaches, etc.)
Volunteers and students will not be present or authorized to issue tickets or warnings, or to act in any type of enforcement
capacity. All interactions are intended to be positive and focused on improving and/or recognizing responsible dog
ownership. Program to be based on efforts in other Canadian cities and elsewhere.

.pdf icon 046 -- Dog Control:
  - .352 FTE addition: 2 Summer students to start ambassador program $42,000.
  - Operating 2014: The Dog License amnesty program will increase 2014 revenue by 30% (additional revenue of $50,000), however, dog impounding revenues are anticipated to continue to decline due to fewer dogs running at large.
Capital:
  • 2014: Communication equipment (radio repeater) $11,500 Pound Improvements $10,000. Capital carry forward: Outside kennel construction $12,500, and Vadim modification for paying tickets/fines online $15,000.
  • 2015: Replacement of the swamp cooler $25,000.
(Source Dec 9 RDCO Board Agenda Item 9.2 2014 2018 Financial Plan Request Items)

- continuation of Dog Service Resource Group (bi-monthly meetings in 2014)
- hosting of public open house in January to review bylaw, and open house in early Spring to draw attention to new model and regulations in advance of Summer months
- hiring of two co-op students in late April, 2014, to develop and implement Dog Ambassador program
- hosting of meeting with dog service providers in Spring
- development of annual survey, with help of Resource Group, for implementation in mid-2014
- development of information kiosk at one or more event in late Spring 2014

SPCA has the interest and capacity to deliver its programs to more students and teachers in the Central Okanagan than are reached at present. The Society is willing, as well, to work with RDCO in determining how (if at all) programs need to be customized to address specific concerns in the Central Okanagan. What the Society would require from RDCO is increased funding, targeted specifically at the education component.
In its discussions on education, the Resource Group suggested that RDCO focus on implementation of increased education in 2015, using funds from increased service revenues.

$15,000 Consulting - Continued use of consultant to assist with facilitating Dog Control Resource Group meetings, to assist in planning and implementing other stakeholder opportunities (e.g., public open house, meeting with service providers), and to assist on other implementation tasks (e.g., development of indicators for quarterly reports, development of policies to guide implementation).
$12,000 co-op Students
$10,000 Education
$8,000 Survey
$3,500 Promotional Items
$3,000 Information Kiosk and Open Houses
   TOTAL $51,500

Resource Group has been established with representation from responsible dog owners and stakeholder groups throughout service area. Current membership includes:
   Irene Beilstein (Lake Country Dog Owners Association)
   Liz Corrigan (trainer - All for Dogs)
   Brad Pattison (trainer - Brad Pattison)
   Suzanne Pugh (Branch Manager - SPCA)
   Lorna Rowland (Central Okanagan Dog Agility Club)
   Marco Veenis, DVM (Veterinarian - Okanagan Veterinary Hospital)
   Tamie Williams (victims' advocate)
Over time it is expected that membership will evolve to include new members. It is also expected that other stakeholder representatives and resources will be invited to join the Group for discussions on specific issues.

The Group has held three, two-hour meetings in the past four months to discuss and provide advice to staff on the refinement and implementation of the new service model.
The Group has also reviewed a draft of the new regulatory bylaw. The Group will be meeting again before Christmas.

The Terms of Reference for the Resource Group are presented
as Appendix I.

(bi-monthly meetings in 2014)

============================

Terms of Reference

PURPOSE AND ROLE
The Dog Service Resource Group exists to provide input, advice and feedback to RDCO staff on matters within the scope of the dog control service. Examples of such matters include:
- the provisions of the Responsible Dog Ownership Bylaw, including the fees and penalties that are used in enforcement
- efforts used by staff to engage dog stakeholder groups and the broader community
- the development and use of educational programs targeted at key audiences
- the development of resources and incentives to promote responsible dog ownership, and to reward dog owners who practice responsible dog ownership
- efforts on the part of staff and the community to deal with aggressive dogs
- the development of realistic targets to achieve under the service
- the use of volunteers to assist in the promotion of responsible dog ownership
- the care of dogs being held in the RDCO's Dog Pound

The Resource Group represents just one of several ways in which RDCO intends to engage stakeholder groups, member municipalities and the broader community on the development and operation of the Dog Control Service. Public workshops, targeted consultations, open houses and other initiatives are additional engagement mechanisms to be used.

It should be emphasized that the Resource Group is NOT a committee of the RDCO Board, and is not intended to meet or provide recommendations directly to the Board. It should also be stressed that the Group is not an advocacy body in place to lobby staff or the Board for specific changes to dog control regulations or other matters.

MEMBERSHIP
Prospective members of the Dog Service Resource Group are invited by RDCO staff to participate in the Group. Members have an active interest in some aspect of dog control and/or dog care, but also have a good appreciation of the broad range of issues that affect the dog control service. Members understand and support the concept of responsible dog ownership, and share the commitment of RDCO to promote the concept through the new service model.

Membership is expected to change over time in order to provide opportunities for different stakeholder representatives to provide input and feedback on dog control issues. Efforts will be made by staff, however, to ensure that the Group's membership includes at all times:
- a representative of the SPCA Kelowna Branch
- representatives of dog owner associations that are active in different parts of the service area
- a representative of the Central Okanagan Dog Agility Club
- a representative of the Okanagan Veterinary Association
- a dog trainer and/or behaviour specialist
- interested members of the public

Staff may invite other persons to attend specific meetings, or to participate in discussions on specific matters. Such persons could include municipal parks staff and/or bylaw enforcement officers from RDCO's member municipalities.
The total number of members is not fixed, and will vary depending on the needs and capacity of staff to receive input and feedback. A target membership size of ten (10) members is viewed as appropriate in order to provide for a good breadth of views, while at the same time allowing for efficient discussions to occur. An attempt will be made to ensure that the Group's membership is representative, as much as possible, of the jurisdictions that comprise the service area, and of the area's demographics.
Every member and every prospective member of the Resource Group whose household owns a dog will have a valid dog license, as well as a record that is free of dog control violations. Members are expected to participate in meetings and discussions without remuneration of any kind.

2014 RDCO DOG BYLAW FINES
2014 RDCO Dog Bylaw fines
click for larger size

2014 RDCO DOG BYLAW FINE PENALTIES

click for larger size

====================

Executive Summary:
John Hailstones has been employed as a Building and Business License Inspector with the Community Services department since October 30,2012. Non-compliance issues within the Building and Business License program are a regular occurrence. John Hailstone's Board appointment will provide for additional tools and depth within his principal accountabilities and within other bylaw enforcement contingencies.

RECOMMENDATION:
THAT John Hailstones be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for all Regional District of Central Okanagan bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio December 9, 2013 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (34.6 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about entire Item 5.1 Dog Control Service Model Implementation Update - .wma (22.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about moving Agenda 7.1 and 7.1b - .wma (317 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 Bylaw Amendments To Approve An Increased Fine For Unlicensed Dogs and only about Item 7.1A Ticket Information And Utilization Amendment Bylaw No 1340 - .wma (4.63 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1B Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No 1341 - .wma (199 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.6 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (97.3 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray - dog waste - .wma (795 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Motion for 5 year plan for dog licensing fees - .wma (211 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Stack - off leash dogs not zero tolerance - .wma (642 KB)

.pdf icon December 9, 2013 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

.pdf icon December 9, 2013 Regional District of Central Okanagan Statutory Board Meeting Minutes

5. DELEGATIONS

5.1 Allan Neilson, Neilson-Welch Consulting Inc. re: Dog Control Service Model Implementation Update (for information)

Allan Neilson was contracted in 2013 to assist in development of the Regional District's dog control implementation plan. The new service model is based on the concept of responsible dog ownership. Neilson's report, dated November 27, 2013, outlined key elements recommended in the final report to the Board and the initiatives that have been undertaken to date.

Neilson provided a review of his November 27, 2013 report to the Board including the work which has been completed in 2013 on: dog licensing, including the successful Amnesty Program in October; bylaw enforcement Consent Orders are successfully being used in a variety of enforcement situations; stakeholder engagement-an open house will be held in to provide input into the proposed bylaw which will be coming forward to the Board January 16th; and education. It was noted that the RDCO will be among the first local government in BC to provide the service of purchasing a dog license on-line (January 2014) and provide a rewards program for dog owners (38 partners to date). It was noted that dog owners have a choice to license but if they choose not to, enforcement fines will be substantially increased in January 2014. It was noted the Resource Group has recommended a fine of between $300-$500. At this time staff is proposing a $300 fine. One of the first elements of a responsible dog owner is to obey the law of the region and license their dog.

A question was raised regarding increasing licensing costs to $25. Neilson noted it may not be the right time to consider increasing licensing, that we want to make it easy for everyone to get a license. Review of licensing fees is part of the on-going review of the service in order to have the service pay for itself.

Long term projections will be done as part of 5-year financial plan. Recovery of costs will be key by the number of licensing.

STACK/FIELDING
THAT the November 27, 2013 Dog Control Service Model Implementation Update presented by Allan Neilson be received for information.

CARRIED

================

7. CORPORATE SERVICES

Dog Control Services

7.1 Bylaw Amendments to Approve an Increased Fine for Unlicensed Dogs

Staff report dated December 3, 2013 outlined the premise of 'zero tolerance' for unlicensed dogs in the Central Okanagan. The current fine is $100, with the fine being waived should the license be purchased within 14 days. As part of the
Dog Control Service Review (Allan Neilson report), it was recommended that zero tolerance for unlicensed dogs be implemented going forward. The recommendation is for a $300 fine effective January 1, 2014.

The question was raised whether licensing fees have been reviewed. Staff and the Resource Group have had preliminary discussions but felt it was not the appropriate time to raise licensing at this time. Further review of fees over the next five years will continue.

a) Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1340, 2013, 1st, 2nd and 3rd readings and Adoption (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

FIELDING/STACK
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Ticket Information and Utilization Amendment Bylaw No. 1340, 2013 be given first, second and third readings and adopted this 9th day of December 2013.

CARRIED

b) Regional District of Central Okanagan Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No. 1341, 2013 ,1st, 2nd and 3rd readings and Adoption (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

FINDLATER/EDGSON
THAT Regional District of Central Okanagan Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No. 1341, 2013 be given first, second and third readings and adopted this 9th day of December 2013.

CARRIED

OPHUS/BASRAN
THAT staff be directed to review dog licensing fee projections for the next five years.

CARRIED

========================

Bylaw Enforcement:

7.6 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - John Hailstones (All Directors Unweighted Vote)

EDGSON/STACK
THAT John Hailstones be appointed as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for all Regional District of Central Okanagan bylaws while employed with the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

CARRIED

*NOTE* JOHN HAILSTONES IS THE CHIEF BUILDING INSPECTOR

====================

9. FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

9.2 2014 - 2018 Financial Plan Request Items For Discussion (for information only) (All Directors - Unweighted Vote)

Staff report dated December 9, 2013 outlined high level impacts to the 2014 - 2018 Financial Plan including an increase to regional parks land acquisition of 3.5 cents; summary of staffing gaps; impacts of service reviews still to be determined (fringe area planning costs allocation, dog control implementation plan, 911 service provision, regional rescue); and carry-over projects. It was noted staff are trying to keep the increase to operating budgets under the CPI.

The information is presented for information only to provide the Board with a sense of what is going into the budget process. The Board will be reviewing the preliminary budget in early February, with adoption of the budget on March 28th.

During discussion questions were raised for further review:
-Regional Parks Maintenance - When is the service review which was not completed last year going to be done? Concern was expressed regarding the transition from summer students to seasonal workers. Staff to bring the rationale forward on this option including costs.
-Alarm fees, when was the last time they were increased? Staff to review the budget and consideration for increased fees.
-Waste reduction management - With the new management contract--MMBC Collection Financial Incentives--are there going to be staff reductions? Staff noted no as we are contractor and will be doing more than in the past.
MMBC will be paying us to run the program (across three functions-waste management, recycling and curb-side).
-Have staff considered contracting out fleet management? This has been considered in the past.

BAKER/GRAY
THAT the update on the 2014-2018 Financial Plan request for items be received for information.

CARRIED

-------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio December 9, 2013 audio of entire RDCO Board meeting - .mp3 (34.6 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about entire Item 5.1 Dog Control Service Model Implementation Update - .wma (22.5 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about moving Agenda 7.1 and 7.1b - .wma (317 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1 Bylaw Amendments To Approve An Increased Fine For Unlicensed Dogs and only about Item 7.1A Ticket Information And Utilization Amendment Bylaw No 1340 - .wma (4.63 MB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.1B Bylaw Notice Enforcement Amendment Bylaw No 1341 - .wma (199 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Item 7.6 Bylaw Enforcement Officer Appointment - .wma (97.3 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Gray - dog waste - .wma (795 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Motion for 5 year plan for dog licensing fees - .wma (211 KB)

Click this Windows Media Audio icon for help with audio files December 9, 2013 audio of RDCO Board meeting only about Director Stack - off leash dogs not zero tolerance - .wma (642 KB)

Blue Divider Line

Bylaw ticket dispute process
Castanet.net - by Wayne Moore - Kelowna - Story: 103425 - Nov 26, 2013<